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The Cordova daily times. [volume] (Cordova, Alaska) 1914-1947, January 19, 1921, Image 1

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VOL. 6. NO. 41 _ CORDOVA, ALASKA, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 1921 PRICE TEN CENTS
I...—---—---—_____
t
DAWSON, Jan. 19 (by Associated
Press).—Frank Wilkins, a Yukon pio
neer, battled for his life in snowdrifts
against a heavy wind, but perished
almost in sight of Stewart City when
his feet gave out. Marks in the
r snow showed that he crawled several
hundred yards before he gave up.
FOUR KILLED
I FIGHTING
NEAR GALWAY
LONDON, Jan. 19 (by Associated
Press).—Pour civilians were killed
and several Blacks and Tans wounded
in a fight in County Galway, Ireland,
according to a report received here.
*The fight started when a Black and
Tan patrol was ambushed near the
city of Galway.
DUBLIN STILL CORDONED
DIUBL1N, Jan. 19 (by Associated
Press).—An area a mile square in
North Dublin is still cordoned by
police, who said they are seeking
men and the seizure of arms, follow
ing an official report that stores of
arms have been found in Cork. Only
two arrests have been made in the
fcrea under guard.
DISMISS TEACHERS
FOR MEMBERSHIP IN
COMMUNIST PARTY
ALBANY, N. Y„ Jan, 19 (by Asso
ciated Press).—Frank Gilbert, acting
commissioner of education, in a de
cision reached yesterday, holds that
membership or participation in the
Communist Party of America is suf
ficient ground for the dismissal of a
public school teacher. The decision
was made in dismissing the appeal of
| Julia Pratt from discharge as a
| teacher by a school board
MURDER CHARGE
PLACED AGAINST
SEATTLE BANDIT
SEATTLE, Jan. 19 (by Associated
Press).—The four bandits who killed
Patrolman S. V. L. Stevens in a gun
fight last week in the Ballard dis
trict have been charged with first
degree murder. Creighton Dodge,
who was seriously wounded in the
battle between the bandits and the
officers, is charged with the actual
shooting of Stevens, and the others
charged with complicity in the crime.
DENIES RUMOR THAT
BIG BOUT CALLED OFF
NEW YORK. Jan. 19 (by Associ
ated Press).—Tex Rickert, one of the
promoters of the Carpentier-Dempsey
championship bout, denies that the
bout has been called off. as an
I nounced by the New York Times.
Easy to Detect Hostile
' Fleet Twenty-four Hours
Before Reaching Coast
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 19 (by As
sociated Press). — California’s coast
line of defense against a hostile fleet
is now 250 miles at sea and before the
end of the year a chain of stations
■will be able to detect a hostile fleet
twenty-four hours before it can reach
the coast, according to Lieutenant
Commander Scott P. McCaughey, dis
trict communication superintendent ot
the Twelfth naval district here.
Directing-finding compass stations
are operating off San Francisco bay,
Eureka and Point Arguello. Within a
I month stations will be opened protect
ing Santa Barbara, San Pedro and San
Diego and one close to the Mexican
border. Before the end of the year
stations will be erected along the
Washington, Oregon and Alaska
coasts, some thirty stations. Then a
ship can be accurately located more
than 400 miles at sea. This new coast
defense, a war invention which saved
the British fleet in the battle of Jut
FIX SALARIES BEFORE
ASKING SHARE PROFITS
MEXICO, Jan. 19 (by Associated
Press).-—Press).—A resolution calling
for inauguration of profit sharing In
industrial plants was rejected at the
final meeting of the Federation of
Labor, which decided it w'ould first
seek legislation fixing minimum sal
► aries.

land and saved London from Zeppelin
attack, is used in peace time to save
vessels from fogs and wrecks by er
rors in steering a false course.
Twelve hundred bearings a month
have been given by the San Francis
co radio-compas, or directing-finding
stations. These groups of radio com
pass stations intercept radio waves
from vessels and can accurately lo
cate the vessel by determining the di
rection from which the waves come.
Mariners, who were skeptical when
plans for the stations were an
nounced, today are co-operating en
thusiastically, according to Lieuten
ant-Commander McCoy. Several
wrecks have been averted. Recently
a Transpacific liner ran into a shoal
off San Francisco during a fog. The
radio-compass stations gave the lin
er’s bearings as ten miles distant
from where the captain’s dead reck
oning placed it. Lifting of the fog
proved the radio-compass direction
right and the captain wrong.
GAS PRICE INCREASED
TO PORTLAND PATRONS
SALEM, Ore., Jan. 19 (by Associ
ated Press).—The public service com
mission of Oregon has authorized in
creased gas rates in Portland and
vicinity from $1 to $1.35 for the first
ten thousand feet and an increase
from 50 cents to 85 cents per month
as the minimum meter rate.
BLOND BEAUTY
CONFESSES TO
MANY CRIES
CHICAGO, Jan. 19 (by Associated
Press).—A woman who gave the
name of Mrs. Cleopatra, a 23-year-old
blonde beauty, has confessed to the
police that she has participated in
oO holdups and robberies within the
last two months. She said she be
came a criminal when her husband
failed.
FIFTY-MILE GALE
SWEEPS NEW YORK
NEW YORK, Jan. 19 (by Associ
ated Press).—A forty-eight mile gale
was blowing here yesterday. One
woman was blown into a manhole
ind another thrown to the pavement.
BILL REDUCING
SIZE OF ARMY
GOES THROUGH
WASHINGTON, Jan. 19 (by Asso
ciated Press).—The senate has set
aside the resolution passed last week
reducing the army to 150,000 and
adopted a new resolution fixing the
limit at 175,000 men. The secretary
of war is directed to stop recruiting
until that number has been reached.
The house took the same action.
DEATH PENALTY FOR
AUTOMOBILE THEFT
_ «
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo., Jan. 19
(by Associated Press).—A bill mak
ing automobile theft a capital crime,
punishable by* death penalty, has
been introduced in the legislature.
Twenty Million Europeans
Desirous of Entering U. S.
As Fabled Land of Promise
BY COL. WINFIELD JONES
WASHINGTON, Jan. 19.—Special
Correspondence). —- If the United
States put up the immigration bars, j
as is now expected, European inimi-!
gration will flow to the Latin-Ameri
can republics, in the opinion of mem-!
bers of congress and officials of the
pan-American union.
Millions of Europeans, suffering j
front the horrors of war, and the ter-1
rible economic conditions that have!
existed in many nations on the con-j
tinent even in those countries that |
are now at peace, are seeking new ]
homes in other lands. Because many
of their close or collateral relatives
are now in the United States their
eyes naturally have been turned to
the land of Stars and Stripes. With
the bars put up in this country the
immigration flood from Europe will
not stop or even be halted—it will be
simply *be diverted toward other)
lands. These countries which will j
offer homes to the European seeking)
anew his fortune and better living i
conditions lie south of the Panama!
canal.
Many of the countries of South i
America would welcome the Euro
pean home seekers. This is especial
ly so in the case of Brazil and the
Argentine republic. Large numbers
of Germans are already colonized in
Brazil, and large numbers of Italians
and Spaniards in the Argentine. The
Germans are so numerous in Brazil
it is said they control several of the
Brazilian states.
One reason why the Europeans,
seeking new homes have not paid'
much attention to the South American j
countries is because there exists a j
general lack of information, not to j
say ignorance, in Europe concerning
pan-Am erica and the countries that
lie south of the equator. On the oth
er hand nearly every European knows
something of the United States and
the possibilities of earning money and
becoming politically a man in the
“land of the free and the home of the
brave.”
The South American countries are
all sparsely populated. It is said that
practically all the population of Eu
rope proper could bettle in Brazil and
the Argentine without crowding each
other. In both republics as well as
many of the smaller pan-American
countries, there are vast areas suit
able for farming and cattle raising.
In these countries the manufacturing
industries, however, are small and are
already almost wholly in the hands of i
the natives. The Europeans going to j
pan-America would be forced to en-i
gage in agricultural and kindred pur
suits.
The South American countries arc
not alive to the possibilities of Eu
ropean immigration, according to of
ficials of the pan-American Union.
The steamship companies plying to
South American ports also do not
seem to realize the possibilities of
diverting the stream of European im
migrants to these countries, though
doubtless when immigration is cut off
to the United States these concerns
will soon be shipping thousands of
Europeans to the southern lands.
As far as Mexico and the Central,
American countries are concerned!
these republics do not offer inviting
fields to the Europeans. Mexico has
never made an effort to secure new
setlers and those that went to that
country uninvited were usually sorry
later, particularly after the end of the
Porfirio Diaz regime and the follow
ing years when the country was rev
olution-torn and bandit-ridden. Per
haps under the Obregon administra
tion conditions will change for the
better and Mexico will become a
haven for the courageous and enter
prising European.
Central America offers practically
nothing to the immigrant. In the
Central American lands about the
only offerings are those which require
large capital to engage in agricul
tural activities on a big scale. The
manufacturing chances are very poor
and labor is badly paid. The Euro
pean will do well to avoid all of the
Central American countries as a new
home.
It is estimated by the bureau or la
bor that more than 25,000,000 Eu
ropeans are now waiting and planning
to leave their home lands. Most of
these men and women want to come
to the United States which they be
lieve to be the fabled land of prom
ise. If they are prevented from enter
ing this country they will enter some
other and there are no other coun
tries to go to except in pan-America.
If prevented from coming to the Unit
ed States they will go to South
America.
■It seems likely now that congress
will put up the immigration bars, if
not at this session certainly at the
next congress, and halt all immigra
tion for at least one year, and per
haps for a longer period.
WANT PORT CHARGES
MADE AGAINST SHIPS
INSTEAD OF CARGO
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 1!) (by As
sociated Press).—W. S. Lincoln, of
the Seattle port commission, at a
meeting here of a committee from
the Pacific Coast Port Authorities'
Association, proposed" that port
charges at all Pacific ports be made
against the ships and railroads in
stead of against the cargo, and the
committee is considering the adoption
of uniform charges.
BOMB EXPLODES
IN TAXI GARAGE
FATAL RESULTS
PHILADELPHIA, Jan. 19 (by Asso
ciated Press).—Two inspectors were
killed and several employes slightly
injured when a bomb exploded in
a garage of the Quaker City Taxi
Company, the chauffeurs of which
company have been on strike for
several weeks. The bomb was found
in a taxi cab ten days ago. During
the strike several cabs have been
stolen and wrecked.
MILLION DOLLAR FIRE
IN MASSACHUSETTS
WORCESTER, Mass., Jan. 19 (by
Associated Press).—Fire which de
stroyed the Knowles building yester
day spread to nineteen other
buildings within a radius of a mile,
while a lumber yard in another part
of the city also burned. The total
loss is more than $1,000,000.
NAVY PLANE IN
PANAMA FLIGHT
REPORTED LOST
ABOARD U. S. S. NEW MEXICO,
AT SEA, Jan. 19 (by Associated
Press).—Two divisions of destroyers
attached to the Pacific fleet have
been ordered to search for the nava\
place NC-6, which is reported lost
off Costa Rica. The plane was one
of the participants in the flight from
San Diego to Balboa.
The NC-5 with the same group was
forced down and partially wrecked
off the Gulf of Nicoya. The crew is
aboard the destroyer Munford, which
is standing by.
The NC-6 was last seem a short
distance from the Gulf of Nicoya
and the fate of the crew is unknown.
The Atlantic fleet is due in Pana
ama bay today.
YOUTHS STEAL
MAIL SACKS AT
UNION STATION
CHICAGO, Jan. 19 (by Associated
Press),—Five youthful bandits held
up a mail truck at the Union station,
escaping in an automobile with 12
sacks, 10 of which contained regis
tered mail, part of which was a fed
eral reserve money shipment to St.
Paul. The value of the loot has not
been determined.
Curfew Law at Dublin
Barring Social Events
Is Hard Blow to Irish
DUBLIN, Jan. 19 (by Associated
Press).—The 10 o’clock curfew, lately
put into effect, hit Dublin a hard blow.
The city had accommodated itself
easily to a mianrgnt closing hour pre
viously in force, but the 10 o’clock em
bargo on all activity meant the com
plete abandonment of all social func
tions in the evening. The result has
been to kill all the trade serving such
events.
The great stores are almost idle,
and the managers of some of the most
popular of them say that they are
operating at a loss. There is no de
mand for new dresses.
The theaters are suffering most. At
one house the first night after cur
few, there were only eleven people in
the alditorium. The moving picture
houses are doing better, but they all
have to close at nine to enable their
patrons to get home before the curfew
PROHIBITION SEEMS
FAILURE IN NEW YORK
NEW YORK, Jan. 19 (by Associ
ated Press).—The number of persons
arrested for intoxication in New York
in the first year of prohibition em
forcement was 166 greater than the
year before, it became known today
on a compilation of the arrests made.
Prom June to December the monthly
j scale of those arraigned increased.
ONE-THIRD LESS WAGE
SCALE IS AGREED TO
HOQUIAM, Wash., Jan. 19 (by As
sociated Press).—The wage scale
board of the employes and employers
of the Grays Harbor district have
agreed to a "331-3 per cent cut in
the wages of loggers, with a mini
mum of $4 a day in camps. The ac
tion was taken to permit the camps
in the district to resume operations.
hour. The music halls which used to
open to two houses a night have now
only one. As they were always full
for each performance this means cut
ting off half their income.
The tramway company’s cars are
now nearly empty in the evenings.
They lately raised the fares by par
liamentary authority to enable them
to meet increased expenses, but the
drop due to the curfew has more than
wiped out the additional receipts.
The regulation is declared to be im
posed in the interest of the public to
induce them to avoid the risks of be
ing abroad after dark. In present
conditions, even if there were no cur
few, many people would be too timid
to leave home in the evenings.
Still there is much criticism of the
imposition of a curfew at 10 o’clock
at night, provoked by assassinations
which took place at 9 o'clock in the
morning.

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