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The Cordova daily times. [volume] (Cordova, Alaska) 1914-1947, February 12, 1921, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86072239/1921-02-12/ed-1/seq-7/

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PROFESSIONAL
DR. W. W. COUNCIL
PHYSICIAN and SURGEON
Office and Residence. Cordova
General Hospital vOstrander
Building).
Phones—Residence, 115; Olfice, 1S2
‘ DR. W. I CHASE "
Physician and Surgeon
Lathrop Building
Phone 9
Established Cordova 1908
♦-♦
I
DR. CHARLES DAGGETT
DR. M. L. BIGGS
DENTISTRY
X-Ray Diagnosis
DR. C. V. DAGGBTT
Pyorrhea Treatment—Dental
Prophylaxis
Lathrop Bldg Phone 200
DiVONZESCH "
Dentist
X-Ray Pyrrohea Treatment*
Dental Prophylaxis
ADAMS BUILDING
DR. H. A. BLYTH
DENTIST
Grown snd Bridge Work a Specialty
NORTHERN HOTEL
Phone 71
•-#
DR. LOUIS H. WOLFE
k DENTIST
KENNECOTT, ALASKA
— _ _ _A
I DONOHOE & D1M0ND
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
Office*:
CORDOVA and VALDEZ
FRANK H. FOSTER
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
ROOM 1. OSTRANDER BUIJ DING
r E. F. MEDLEY
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR
AT LAW
Room 1, Adams Block
CORDOVA, ALASKA
*•
WILLIAM A. HESSE
U. 8. MINERAL SURVEYOR
Bedford-McNelll Coda
CorcL f Alaska
--—♦
Frank A. Metcalf Raymond F. Grefe
METCALF AND GREFE
Civil and Mining Engineers
U. S. Mineral Surveyor*
JUNEAU ----- ALASKA
-4---■<>
OIL BONDS
\ SURETY AND FIDELITY BONDS
LIFE INSURANCE
ACCIDENT INSURANCE
THOS. 8. 8C0TT
<»; - ■-<
H. B. W0LK1NG & CO.
Licensed
UNDERTAKERS
And
EMBALMERS
Phone 1SS—I
‘OSCAR’S PUCE
FOR
GOOD CIGARS
AND TOBACCOS OF ALL KIND8
AL80
Pool Table*
:
FIRE, MARINE, ACCIDENT
INSURANCE
REAL ESTATE
COLLECTIONS
SURETY BONDS
DWELLINGS AND BUSINESS
HOUSES FOR RENT
CORDOVA ABSTRACT &
REALTY CO.
C Ave. between 1st and 2nd 8ts.
Eye Witness 1
Lincoln As
In Washi
“An eyewitness of the assassina
tion of Abraham Lincoln!” is a
phrase that even fifty-odd years has
failed to strip of interest. In an of
fice of the old national museum
building at Washington, one can find
George C. Maynard, curator of tech
nology. An atmosphere of peace per
vades the place until one speaks the
magic words which brings to mind
that fateful night at Ford’s theater
in April, 1S65. Then Doctor May
nard tells of what he saw.
“That evening,” says Doctor May
nard, referring to the night of April
14, 1865, "I went to Ford’s. As
everybody knows, the play was “Our
American Cousin.’ My seat was in
the first gallery, on a level with and
in full view of the upper right-hand
box which was reserved for Presi
dent Lincoln and his party
“The occasion was an unusual one.
The war had come to be regarded as
an interminable conflict, something
which would always engulf this coun
try. Those in the theater that night
were giving vent to perhaps their
first real enthusiasm that the war
had actually ended. It was to be
a gala night. An atmosphere of fes
tivity pervaded the place. Also, it
was Laura Keene’s benefit.
rsaturauy, it was a patriotic per
formance. I still have a small scrap
of paper on which I wrote the musi
cal program. ‘The Star-Spangled
Banner, ‘Red, White and Blue,’ and
‘Marching Along' were played, while
the entire company was to have sung
‘Honor to Our Soldiers,' a patriotic
song of the times.
“The president and his party did
not arrive before the curtain rose. It
was during the dairy scene when
they came in. Miss Hart, playing
Georgiana, was telling an American
joke to Mr. Emerson, and he failed
to catch the point. Twice she said
to him: ‘Why, can’t you see it?”
And he replied: ‘No, I cawn't see
it.’ At this moment the presiden
tial party entered, passing around the
south side of the gallery to enter the
box. The play was suspended until j
President Lincoln was seated, the au
dience having risen with one ac
cord and cheered enthusiastically.
After some time Georgiana said, with
emphasis: ‘Well, everybody can see
that,’ and Dundreary drawled: ‘They
ought to see it, you know.’
"It was about 10:30 when the pis
tol shot which sent the bullet at Lin
coln was fired. Booth suddenly slid
down from the front of the box onto
the stage and rushed diagnally
across, disappearing. He caught his
foot in the flag decorations and made
some exclamation-which I did not un
derstand, but no such dramatic
speech as has popularly been ac
credited to him. Had he done any
thing of that kind I believe he would
have been mobbed before he could
have escaped. As it was, J. B. Stew
ard, a man of athletic build, sprang
onto the stage and was after Booth
immediately.
"There was no panic, such as a fire
would have caused. The entire au
dience waB stunned, the real signifi
cance of the tragedy coming only
after several minutes. The theater
people swarmed upon the stage. An
officer in military uniform managed
to get to the president by climbing
up from the stage into the box, the
door having been barred. Laura
Keene came quickly through the gal
lery with a pitcher of water, lending
an odd note to the scene with her
costume and make-up. The door of
the box by this time was opened and
she entered.
"Intense excitement reigned, yet no
lack of self-control. There seemed to
be a desire to lend whatever assist
ance was possible, while the air was
electrical with a spirit of vengeance
against Booth for the crime just com
mitted. Several people climbed over
seats, I myself helping one lady thus
in making her exit. Some seats were
broken. Yet, withal, the people left
the theater slowly and quietly. It
was about ten minutes before the
president was removed, followed by
Mrs. Lincoln supported by two gentle
men. A crowd of people filled Tenth
street.
"At that time I was a member of
the military telegraph corps of the
war department, being a cipher oper
ator. I rushed to the office. Per
sons I met on the way were ignorant
of the tragedy. At the office the
news had been learned, but no de
tails, and D. H. Bates, manager 81
the office, asked for particulars.
"A full ffcrce of telegraphers spent
the night in the office, sending out
| reports of the president’s condition. l‘t
! was eight o’clock on the following
; morning before I left for my lodgings.
I walked along G. street. The morn
1 ing was rainy, raw and cheerless. Be
tween Thirteen and Fourteenth
ells of
sassination
ngton Theater
streets, almost in front of Epiphany
church, I met a small squad of cav
alry, accompanied by a few military
officers and civilians on foot. The
band was proceeding quietly and with
an evident desire to avoid public no
tice. They were escorting the presi
dent’s body to the White House.
"There is one other memory of that
time of sorrow which I retain vivid
ly. On the morning the president’s
body began the journey to Spring
field it was warm, bright and alto
gether a day best suited to rejoicing,
yet all Washington had come down
town to see the funeral procession.
Processions, normally, are stretched
out, but this one was made as com
pact as possible. In the front went
a detachment of cavalry, wedge
shaped. Very slowly they proceeded,
making their way steadily into the
crowds which swarmed the streets,
forcing them silently back to the
curb. Carriages containing officials,
instead of going single file, went
three and four abreast. The horses’
footfalls were the loudest sounds,
while sobs punctured the stillness of
the watching multitude.”
SABBATH MADE FOR
MAN, NOT VISE VERSA
COMMITTEE REPORTS
THE HAGUE, Feb. 12 (by Associ
ated Press).—An indictment of “blue
Sunday” advocates was returned in
the report of a committee of the
chamber of the Dutch parliament on
a bill proposing to forbid amuse
ments. curtail train service, etc., on
Sundays.
“The Sabbath was made for man,
not man for the Sabbath,” said the
report, killing the bill. “The closing
of the theaters and the prohibition of
games would lead many to seek
amusement in a less innocent way.
The reduction of passenger traffic on
Sundays would prevent people who
were shut up in close homes and
narrow streets all the week from en
joying fresh air and nature on the
Sabbath.”
BIG ORDER OF KHAKI
BOUGHT BY SOVIETS
LONDON, Feb. 12 (by Associated
Press).—The Soviet government of
Russia has recently bought privately
from British firms 2,500,000 yards of
khaki cloth for £1,375,000, says the
Evening Standard. Payment was
made by Moscow depositing gold at
a Stockholm bank.
The Soviet government still wants
over 3,000,000 yards of khaki cloth,
but cannot obtain it, besides a vast
quantitly of paper.
'Your eyes fitted. Compound and
stigmatic lenses replaced. See Os
borne.
We save you money
-on
New & Secondhand
Furniture
Our prices are rio-Kt
keisTfurniture to.
We Sell Goods On Commission
Next door to Alaska S. S. Office
“Billy's”
RESTAURANT
OPEN DAY AND
NIGHT
TOM GOTO, Prop.
Phone 197
For
Messenger
At Any Time
Phone 7—2 ring's
TRAY SERVICE
THE CLUB
ESTABLISHED 1909
ESTABLISHED 1909
Lincoln's Birthday
Today we pay silent tribute to the mem
ory of him who saved our nation.
His abiding faith, his unflinching cour
age, his simple character and kind heart, are
an everlasting inspiration to every citizen of
the land.
He once said, “Teach economy, that is
one of the first and highest virtues. It begins
with saving money.”
Let us all practice the virtue of thrift.
First Bankof Cor do v a
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY FOR POSTAL SAVINGS FUNDS
The Concrete Bank
Established 1909
^ In planning your itinerary for the new
year don’t neglect this importent item.
Up-to-date business and personal station
ery is an essential factor in your success.
•I This office is completely equipped in
every detail to supply your needs in the
printing line at prices that compare fav
orably with those of the Outside.
€J By letting us do your work you save
time and money—We guarantee to give
you satisfaction.
"Keep your dollars in Cordova”
The Job Printing Department
of the
Cordova Daily Times
“Makers of Distinctive Printing”

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