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The Cordova daily times. [volume] (Cordova, Alaska) 1914-1947, May 20, 1921, Image 4

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THE CORDOVA DAILY TIMES
Entered at the Postoffice at Cordova,
Alaska, as Second-Class Matter.
H. G. STEEL
Proprietor and Publisher
CHAS. J. FISK Associate Editor
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
•ingle Copies .$ .10
Ot*e Month (in advance) . 1.25
•lx Months (in advance) . 6.00
>ne Year (in advance) . 12.00
MEMBER OF ASSOCIATED PRES
The Associated Press is exclusively
entitled to the use for republication of
all news credited to it or not otherwise
news published herein.
AH rights of republication of specia
dispatches herein are also reserved.
Foreign Advertising Representative
THE AM ERIC AN PRESS. SSOCIATION _
FRIDAY, MAY 20, 1921
PLANT FLOWERS
While flowers are considered the
language of love, they are also the
language expressing the esthetic
taste of the home. A vase of blos
soms reposing in the center of the
table adds a charm such as no other
embellishment can add. They convey
the tenderest emotions of the house
wife and reflect their beauty in con
sonance with the general atmosphere
of the home.
And there are the flowers of the
yard and garden, all of which serve
to set off the premises and reflect
the desire of the householder to sur
round him or herself with the things
that go to make tenure on this
sphere one carrying its full meas
ure of joy and contentment. The
humblest home may be transformed
into a bower of beauty and clothed in
a mystic charm by the addition of a
flower bed, a hop vine over the porch
or arching the walk serves to break
the monotony of the drab street or
forbidding the landscape.
Plant flowers.
A NEW WHITE HOUSE
There is now a new White House.
It is the same old building on historic
Pennsylvania Avenue that has housed
our presidents tor many years, but
the atmosphere is totally different.
For the past eightyears, under the
Wilson administration, the White
House was practically barred to visit
ors. When Mr. Wilson first became
president he threw the White House
open to the public and any citizens!
could always go there and get a hear- J
ing. It was an easy matter to see |
the president then. But soon this
was changed. Mr. Wilson started out
to see the Washington correspondents
regularly, but this custom was after
a time discontinuel. Everybody had
to see Mr. Tumulty. Consequently
Mr. Tumulty soon acquired an import
ance out of all proportion to his posi
tion. He became a sort of unofficial
president, with practically all the
power of the real president in his
hands. When the war began the
White House grounds were closed to
everybody. Military and police guard
ed the big white mansion and its
large grounds so closely that a rab
bit could not have gained access to
the White House undetected. The
whole block bounding the White
House was practically forbidden to
the public. After the armistice and
the Paris conference Mr. Wilson
fell sick. Though the war had end
ed the White House remained shroud
ed in the same seclusion as during the
war. The public was still barred
from the house and the grounds, and
though the military guards were fin
ally removed the police remained.
This condition prevailed right up to
the day that Mr. Wilson left the
White House, though he had so far
recovered his health that he was able
to accompany Mr. Harding *o the
Capitol on March 4, last, when the
new president took office.
All this is now changed. Mr.
Harding had no sooner entered upon
his duties than the White House
grounds were thrown open to the
public. So was part of the White
House itself. The humblest citizen
can now come to Washington and
wander at will through the magnifi
cent gardens and lawns, and even en
ter and inspect certain rooms of the
house itself. Anybody that has busi
ness with Mr. Harding can easily see
the president by arranging an inter
view through hi3 efficient secretary
George B. Christian, Jr.
In addition to these material
changes there is a change in the very
atmosphere of the executive man
sion. Under Mr. Wilson the building
seemed to take on a cold, and forbid
\
*
ding exterior. Under Mr. Harding
there seems to be a cordial and
friendly air surrounding the White
House. It is as if the president
had said: “This place belongs to the
people and I am the chief servant
of the people. Enter here and be
welcome.” That is the general feel
ing of everybody who visits Wash
ington, and few visitors to the na
tional capital fail to go to the White
House while they are here.
The Washington corps of corres
pondents, numbering about 300, and
representing practically every daily
newspaper in the United States that
takes special telegraphic dispatches
from Washington, are especially
pleased with the change of adminis
tration. Under the Wilson adminis
tration even the correspondents were
barred from the White House. They
could not see the President and had
to depend on Tumulty for their in
formation. It often became impos
sible at times to even see Tumulty.
Under the new conditions the corps
of correspondents see Mr. Christian
daily at 10 a. m., and it is the gen
eral opinion among the newspaper
men that there has never been a bet
ter private secretary to any presi
dent in many years. The newspaper
men see the president himself on
Tuesdays and Fridays, and Mr. Hard
ing at these conferences is always
willing to answer questions and give
information concerning the cabinet
meetings, which are held on these
days, or on any other subject the
newspapers require information upon.
Not all of the information given by
the president at these conferences
can be printed. Mr. Harding states
what can be used in the press and
suggests what should be kept confi
dential until he is ready to announce
such news. These confidences are
never violated. Such is the Impres
sion already made on the correspond
ents by the new president that, all
are ready to swear by him. and it is
a fact that every correspondent al
ready feels that he is Mr. Harding’s
real friend, and Mr. Harding is his
friend.
The atmosphere of the cabinet has
also undergone a great change. The
cabinet officers in this administra
tion see the correspondents regular
ly and are always willing to give out
information that the newspapers de
sire. The Wilson cabineteers seemed
to care nothing for public opinion.
Consequently they had few friends
among the Washington writers.
This was one of the causes of the
failure of the Wilson administration.
THINGS WE THINK
Things Others 'nink and What We
Think of the Things Others Think.
Rubbing up with the world is what
puts the polish on a person.
It’s usually a mistake ta treat a
new friend better than an old one.
It's funny how sagely some people
can tell others just how to do things
they can’t do themselves.
Somehow or another we never did
have any affection for a woman after
seeing her kiss some little pup’s
snout.
A woman can face a blizzard in a
cheese-cloth skirt and feel warm as
long as she knows she is wearing her
rubbers.
No matter how safe we may make
°ur banking system, the ballet danc
er’s fortune will still be inside her
stocking.
Enough money has been thrown
away on roads in this old country of
ours to have surfaced them with
silver dollars.
There are a lot of things that go on
that the newspapers never hear about
and a lot of things the newspapers
hear about that never go on.
A woman has just got a judgment
of $25,000 in a breach-of-promise suit.
She is an old maid and may figure
that she is money out at that.
We are not so much different from
our forefathers who burned witches
at the stake. We skin politicians at
(he polls and roast ’em to a fare-you
well.
Man jests at woman's volubility—
and yet but for his gift of gab many
a prominent man might be trundling
a wheelbarrow or doing some other
equally useful task.
We have it on good authority that
at its present price beefsteak is a
dangerous article of food, being a
breeder of appendicitis, tuberculosis,
cancer and other ^luxuries that only
the rich can afford.
Anyway, you can’t condemn wo
men’s skirts any more for being germ
carries. As the Arkansas Gazette
shrewdly remarks, any germ that gets
Into a skirt these days has got to be
a pole-valter.—Eugene (Or.) Register.
———— " ■ \
When in Need of
Drugs
OR
Drug Sundries
VISIT US
Our Stock of Cigars Are Second to None in
Cordova
We Pride Ourselves on Our Elegant Assort
ment of Candies. Fresh Shipments on
Every Boat
NORTHERN DRUG CO.
“THE DRUG STORE OF ALASKA"
“SERVICE” is our motto.
This is the time of year to
invest in a
NEW HAT
We carry an extra fine line of
Stetson's, at the right price.
WILL
niiimmiin
CLAYSON
What kind of poles do you refere to?
Nothing but big timber here.
The white woman who marries a
negro will always have a color line to
hang her washing on.
For a temporary career good inofials
aren’t as necessary as a smooth nptn
ner and polished appearance.
Chicago’s police matron says 90 per
cent of the deserted wives had little
men for husbands. Well, it’3 a mighty
small man, anyway, who deserts wife
and children.
Old Mother Hubbard
Went to the cupboard
For some beer to quench her thirst;
But when she got there
The cupboard was bare—
The old man had got there first.
PEOPLE OF OUR TOWN
Every town has a Good Ole Scout
who takes a Healthy Interest In Every
thing that's goin£ on. Nothing es
capes his Eagle Eye or Eager Ear and
he’s a reg’lar Npws Mine for the Edi
tor. Were It not for the Volunteer
Reporter, the Paper would not be So
Newsy sometimes. Here’s to you, Ole
Scout I
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
FOR SALE—GAS BOAT RATTLER.
Inquire the First Bank of Cordova.
M20-tf.
FOR SALE—TWO OAK CHAIRS, $1
each< dining table $8; Garnet heat
er, etc., $10; Mars range, $30; li
brary table, $8; desk, $4; oil heat
er, $5; box mattress, $15; 2 tubs,
50c each; 1 ball bearing wringer,
$8; 12 yards inlaid linoleum; also
contents two room apartment, $50.
Room 2 Michelson-Currier Bldg.
r M20-4t.
FOR SALE — OLIVER TYPEWRI1'
er in excellent condition, $20. Call
Times. M20-tf.
FOR SALE—THREE-ROOM FURN
ished house in Oldtown. Phone 33—
2 rings. Mrs. Joe Kieffer. M16 tf.
FOR RENT—THREE ROOM FURN
ished apartment, 142—3 rings.
FOR RENT—FOUR ROOM FURN
ished apartment, with bath. Apply
O. L. Johanson. 12-tf.
FOR SALE — TWO ROOM~FURN
ished house, 12-room furnished
apartment house, S. J. Jones. Phone
142—3 rings. A30-tf.
FOR RENT—THREE ROOM HOUSE,
partly furnished. Apply Blum
O’Neill Co. A29-tf.
_ _ _ _ •
FOR SALE—9X12 RUG apply at
Times office. 16-tf.
WANTED—SALESMAN TO REPRE
sent Ladies’ Cotton Jersey Bloom
ers. Exclusive territory. Reply
direct, giving references. Atlantic
Mdse Co. Inc., 259 Fifth Ave., New
York City. 15-tf.
FOR RENT—APARTMENTS IN THE
Burkhart Flats. Phone 61. 3-tf.
- - ■ * ____
FOR RENT—FURNISHED CABINS.
See Dooley.
FOR SALE — BOAT, WITH SIX
horse power engine. See John
Steffgen. 24-tt
WRITE VIOLET RAY, S. DENNISON,
Ohio, if you wish a pretty and
wealthy wife. Enclose stamp.
“A Bigger Cordova”
To the
Merchants,
Business and
Professional
Men of
Cordova
i
Your Attention
is invited to
the work
that the
Cordova
Chamber of
Commerce
is doing.
Investigating
Inquiries freely
frankly answered
Cordova needs its Chamber
of Commerce. Every
business man and woman in
the city should be a
member.
No investment pays better
or is more permanent them
membership in the local
Chamber.
DON’T
BE A SLACKER!
Come in with the present
membership and help
share the responsibility
of making Cordova
flVGGER ?
ketter
i/USlER

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