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The Cordova daily times. [volume] (Cordova, Alaska) 1914-1947, April 14, 1923, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86072239/1923-04-14/ed-1/seq-7/

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SPINSTER BABY
FACT NOW, SAYS
WOMAN DOCTOR
Are Mainly Responsible
for Low Mortality,
Claim
BRING SCI : HEALTH
Infant Death Largely
Traceable to Ignorance
of Mothers
SYRACLSE, April 14—“The spin
ster’s baby of the proverb lias ma
terialized. It has arrived. The ideal
of the proverb has become real.”
So today declares Dr. Theresa Ban
non, one of the best-known women
physicians in the State, veteran of the
World War, writer and attache of the
Syracuse City Bureau of Health. Dr.
Bannon continues:
“The parent long ago was found
wanting in some things, and the com
munity, the school and the church
have taken over some of the care
of offsprings.
“The baby, however, was left in
its mother's arms, but now even she
has been adjudged inefficient in its
care, and the spinster public health
worker claims the baby. She goes
further and seeks to supervise the
child from its conception and thus
mitigate the burdens of Eve.
“From the medical profession the
spinster brings instruction and ad
vice and warning based on the death
record of babies who too soon re
turned to the angelhood whence they
came.
“Public attention focussed on this
mortality record found the cause to
be chiefly lack of knowledge on the
part of the mother of her own need
and that of her unborn baby.
Nature Not at Fault
“Nature herself is not at fault, for
women the world over safely bring
forth and rear their young. Poverty,
the cause of most social evils, is also
here acquitted, for the highest infant
mortality is not apyong the poor.
“The spinster asks for her baby
just a few simple things. She asks its
expectant mother to observe a few
rules in diet and work and rest. She
asks her to consult a physician early,
especially before the coming of her
first-born, which, more than any sub
sequent birth, imperils the mother.
“The firstborn, too, incurs greater
risks than any other.
“It is asserted that 75 per cent of
accidents is preventable by prenatal
supervision.
“The arrival of a normal baby into
the world of individual existence is a
triumph, a victory over the powers of
evil. Called from high heaven, it
found parents reconciled at least to
the burden of its coming.
“It is now the spinster’s charge.
Spinster Teaches Mother
“Many dangers surround the new
born, most of which are avoided when
the baby has its natural food from its
mother’s breast. The spinster must
often persuade a mother to nurse her
baby.
"After a dominance of many years
the artificial feeding of babies is
passing.
“The spinster knows from the vital
statistics of her community that four
babies artificially fed die to one
breast-fed, that the babe at the breast
develops normally with health and
strength, while the other bears the
handicap of diminished vitality all its
life long.
“It is obvious that the deaths under
one week of age are from prenatal
causes or conditions at birth. Such
conditions have long prevailed, un
affected by the general advance of
medical service, but now attention and
study of these conditions give quick
results in diminished mortality.
“Prenatal care is, of course, ma
ternal care, and thereby the death
rate of women at childbirth is re
duced to the minimum. Supervision
is, after all, possible only for the few
who consent to consultation. It is a
private matter, in spite of secratic
treatise and State claims. It is a
physiological process and not a surgi
cal or medical case for a specialist.
“Its dangers are common to all wo
men of all races, but these dangers
are incidental, not inevitable.
“Still there is too much needless
suffering and death among women
and their babies, and it is the spin
ster's care to prevent them by preach
ing simplicity of life for its greater
security and enjoyment and reward.”
The time to hustle for business is
now and the Daily Times is the prop
er meduim.
♦-♦
Daily News
Letter
General News and Gossip
From Abroad.
♦-♦
TODAY—Roland Krebs, Chicago cor
respondent, writes of popular stamp
grounds frequented by followers of
night life in the mid-West me
tropolis.
CHICAGO, April 14.—There is an
expensive waffle shop on the fashion
able North Shore of Chicago where at
certain hours of the early morning
one finds nearly all the patrons either
just plain drunk or else slightly lath
ered.
They bring no liqucr with them, nor
is it served to them there, yet the
phenomenon persists.
Here’s how it is: After an all-night
party it’s considered the smart thing
to do to drop in at this shop for break
fast just before sunrise. No matter
if the brave men and fair women have
been disporting themselves in alco
holic aquariums downtown the party’s
a flop if it doesn't begin to taper off
over the bacon and eggs in this es
tablishment.
So 5 a. m. finds the merry-makers
speech-making, wearing tissue caps,
singing and passing back and forth
song and quip, with not a drop in
sight.
It’s an all-night place and, strange
ly, male waiters do net succeed the
waitresses at a late hour, as is the
case in most places employing women
for that purpose in daylight hours.
However, the management has its
prettiest girls on duty in the after
noon and early evening, but after the
midnight hours waitresses whom
rounders call lady blacksmiths be
cause of their proportions and hostile
demeanor hand out black Java for
shaky heads. They permit no one to
get “fresh.”
The younger element of Chicago
has introduced other innovations. Just
now its favorite dance rendezvous is
in a place called “The Stables,” sit
uated on the Chicago River’s banks
and sandwiched in between factories,
tenements and warehouses. It just
reeks with atmosphere.
"The Stables” is another place at
which elaborate parties get their sec
ond start of the evening, or rather,
early morning.
Taxicabs ply through a gooey mire
in the unkempt streets and draw up to
a shabby roose of a building before
which parades an archaic negro with
silk hat, red muffler, wine-hued great
coat, plastered with pewter buttons,
and carrying a red lantern.
Inside there is a stall, festively dec
orated with prongs, halters, and the
like, and a sign: “Check your har
ness, here.” It’s the cloak room. Up
stairs a negro jazz-band holds forth.
The lights all are shaded, and candles,
dripping with chilled wax and stuck
into greasy old bottles, dimly illumi
nate the tables. The walls are smoked
and chalked with the initials of guests.
Broken windows are stuffed with red
flannel. Oh, yes, it’s atmosphere
enough! However, evening dress is
the custom. Prices are accordingly
adjusted.
No one thinks of going before dawn.
The patronage is of the heaviest, as a
string of taxicabs waiting in the
streets at late hours indicates.
People who dance, dance all night in
Chicago. Quite the opposite of “The
Stables” is the “Bal” given each Sat
urday night in a downtown hotel. It's
a very elaborate affair and is frequent
ed by local and national celebrities.
The “Bal” is a favorite haunt for aris
tocrats of the theatrical world. It is
conducted much like a supper club.
Memberships must be obtained as in
a club. Invitations are restricted.
Music is furnished from midnight
until daybreak by an orchestra famous
for its phonograph records.
This city is so dance-made that
money once invested in theaters now
is put into ballrooms all over the
town. North Side and South Side
alike have many of these places. Each
tries to outdo the other in furnishings,
luxuries and entertainment. There
are only a few down-town and in the
near-downtown. Most of them draw
their patronage from surrounding
neighborhood sections. Their popu
larity is so great that lamentations
from downtown theatrical producers
fill pages in national weeklies devoted
to the show business. It is notable
that all season Chicago has not had a
play or musical show that could bo
called a "Wow.” Those that New
York called "Wows" came here full
of giddy hope and turned out to be
"Oonks.” The city is too busy danc
ing.
; ft
C Street Shoe Shop
All kinds of leather goods re
paired with only the best of
materials.
Men's Half Soles and Heels $2.75
Ladies’ Half Soles and Heels 2.25
A. VALENZUELA, PROP.
Feed Your
SYSTEM
DON’T DRUG IT
Your dirt is your health. Don’t starve
your body. Feed it with the food that
will supply the lacking essential VITA
MINES and MINERAL ELEMENTS to
your system. DRUGS CANNOT CURE
YOU. They will make your case more
advanced and more difficult to conquer.
Our MINERAL SALT TREATMENT
contains the vnluahle PHOSPHATES,
SULPHATES, CHLORIDES. CALCLITJM,
SODIUM, etc.,- in a concentrated OR
GANIC form. It is a PERFECT BLOOD
and NERVE FOOD, a VITALIZING
STIMULANT without alcohol, a NERVE
SEDATIVE without narcotics, a LTVER
INVTGORATOR and BLOOD PURTFIER.
a REVITALTZER and REGENERATOR
of the entire system. Tt is sufficient
In all common cases while the PHOENIX ;
CURE fs essential in the inveterate.
We treat practically all ailments and
diseases successfully. Fill out the cou
pon below and mail to us at once for
FREE LITERATURE and ADVICE for
your particular case.
YOGHURT HEALTH LABORATORIES
Dept. 5, So. Bellingham, Wash.
Mail me without obligation on my part
FREE Treatise on Disease as marked by
an X in list below:
Anaemia Diabetes Piles
Arterio Emaciation Rectal
Sclerosis Epilepsy Disease
Asthmas Goitre Rheumatism
Bladder Heart Disease Skin Disease
Disease Insomnia Stomach
Bronchitis Kidney Disease
Cancer Disease Tumors
Catarrh Liver Disease Or .
Gonstipation Neurathenia
Consumption Paralysis
Also send fe (fr^e! complete informa
tion about Yoghurt Temple of Health.
Name .
Street Address.
Town .
State .
A1 McLaren of Cordova, says: “Your
treatment has made a new man of me,
it has done me so much good I can
hardly express it in words. My suffer
ings were terrible, my kidneys has been
bleeding for over four months before I
started your treatment. T was so weak
T could hardly walk a block. T also
had stomach trouble, my intenstines
were in bad condition. I am now feeling
fine, my sufferings are all gone. I can
now do a hard days work with no pain
or ache. My friends are all surprised to
see me looking and feeling so well. I
must say your mineral salts have been
a God.send to me. Thanking you *or
the great relief I have received from
them I remain, Gratefully.
(Signed! AL McLAREN.
PLUMBING HEATING
1 CHARLES LGRABER s
§ House Phone Shop Phone 2
! 32-4 Ca"fUp 72 I
0 Water Pipe or Plumbing Need Fixing
8HEET METAL REPAIRING
CORDOVA MEAT COMPANY
Is Handling exclusively
SWIFT’S DRESSED BEEF, VEAL,
MUTTON, PORK and POULTRY
WE AIM TO PLEASE
PHONE 173
r
THE NORTHERN CLUB
FRED HAEF, Proprietor
Pool, Cards, Tobacco
Soft Drings of All Kinds
THE POPULAR CORNER
PHONE 47 CORDOVA, ALASKA
All Alaskan Trails end at the
Hotel Atwood
First Avenue and Pine Street
SEATTLE, WASH.
Nearest to Everything
Clean—Modem
J. A. FARNHAM and TED TAYLOR, Proprietors
Ted Taylor, Formerly Chief Steward Steamship Alaska and Mariposa
Manhattan Hotel
MRS. JEANETTE BEYER MRS. BETTY MORRISSEY
Electric Lighted. Hot Water. Turkishs and Tub
Baths.
PHONE 99
CORDOVA, ALASKA
MELBY’S
FLOWER SHOP
Floral Decorations for All Occasions
1515 Third Ave. , ^ P Seattle, Wash.
“Say It With Flowers”
All Mail or Telegraphic Orders From Alaska
Will Be Given Personal Attention.
When You Go to Seattle Stop at the
HOTELBUTLER
Where the Service Is Unexcelled
THE WASHINGTONIANS
Symphonic Interpolators
Distinctive Novelties Captivating Rhythm
At the Cafe Every Night
6:30 p. m. to 1 a. m., Continuous.
ARE YOU LOYAL?
Support the advertisers of this paper by spending
^our money with them. Keep your money ir
Cordova. . . .a it *j i. JL
Like A
Wheelbarrow
A savings account is like a
wheelbarrow—it stands still unless
someone pushes it.
You can’t expect your savings
account to move ahead unless you
do the pushing. One nice thing
about a savings account, though, is
the more you push the lighter the
load.
Think it over—then start your
account rolling. Today.
The First Bank of Cordova
The Concrete Bank
Establlsed 1903

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