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The sea coast echo. [volume] (Bay Saint Louis, Miss.) 1892-current, April 21, 1906, Image 1

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86074033/1906-04-21/ed-1/seq-1/

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THIS PAPES IS
The Official Journal
-OP TUB
CITY OF BAY ST. LOUIS.
Subscription: $1.50 Per Annum.
THE ULD CONFEDERATE BATTLE
FLAGS.
(Jackson press special to N.O. Picayune)
One of the acts of the present Legis
lature which is bringing results, is that
which provides for cases for the preser
vation of battle flags, the amount appro
priated being SI,OOO. Director Dunbar
Rowland, of the Bureau of Archives and
History, has taken the preliminary steps
for securing the necessary cases and
they will be in hand shortly, it is be
lieved. The first fruits of this provision
were seen yesterday, when there arrived
at the capitol two tattered silken ban
ners bearing the sacred Stars and Bars,
both mad'' by the lovely and devoted
women of Jefferson county in I*6l, both
of which saw service in the field, one of
which bears the marks of shots and
shells, and while tattered, bears every
evidence of having been well nurtured
since the trying times which brought
the banners into existence.
One of these flags was that of the
Charley Clark Rifles, of Union church,
which company was mustered into the
service in April, 1S(>1, the flag bearing
that date. It was carried to the front
and was in action in the early days of
the campaigning in Virginia, and was
kept with the company until the adop
tion of the battle flag when the survivors
of the company returned it to Jeffeison
county, where it was kept in the family
of Mrs. Galbreath who still retained it
among her precious relics of the time.
Ehe intrusted it to the care of A. M.
McCallum, who took it in charge and
brought to Jackson. Had she not been
assured that the flag would be as well
preserved as if in her own custody, Mrs.
Galbreath, it is stated, would never have
consented to its leaving her life time.
The other flag was that of the Rodney
Guards, a company also organized in
Jefferson county, and was brought along
with the Union Church flag by Mr. Jos
eph King, a survivor of the company,
who was proud to deliver it into the
hands of Mrs. Eron Gregory in the Ar
chives Bureau office. The two commis
saries were accompanied by Capt. John
\V. Broughton, of Red Lick, who is dis
trict agent for the Archives and Histo
ry Bureau, and who has been active in
securing trophies from that interesting
and romantic section of Mississippi from
which so many brave and noble men
went forth in full tide of glorious and
eager youth to battle for the principles
they loved. It is probable other tro
phies of this kind will be dug up and
sent or brought to the Archives Depart
ment as a result of the act providing for
their preservation.
She Worked Combination.
A rather unusual divorce case was
tried in Copiah county a few days ago. A
wdfe has no difficulty in finding the
combination to her husband’s pants
pocket, but according to the following
from the Jackson News, this wife found
the combination to her husband’s store
safe:
State Senator M S. McNeil has re
turned from nazlehurst, where he was
engaged for three days in the trial of a
rather singular divorce suit in the Co
piah county chancery court.
The proceeding was instituted by W.
B. Boyd, a prominent merchant of Crys
tal Springs, against his wdfe, Ella Mc-
Cain, who sought severance of the mat
rimonial bond on the ground of cruel
and inhuman conduct. He was repre
sented by Senator McNeil, while Hon.
R. N. Miller acted as counsel for the
defendant, and three full days were con
sumed with the taking of testimony, at
the conclusion of which the jury failed
to reach a verdict.
The bill of complaint alleged that
Mrs. Boyd invaded the furniture store
kept by her husband, rifled the safe of
its contents, frequently changed the com
bination on the safe, and went around
the town telling citizens not to trade
with her husband, as he was a cheat
and a fraud. All of this was disputed
in the answer to the bill, and a large
amount of conflicting testimony was
offered at the trial. Mrs. Boyd was
formerly Miss McCain, of Water
Valley.”
Notable Increase in the Bay St. Louis
P. O. Receipts.
Bay St. Louis Post Office gross re
ceipts for the past three years:
Year ended March 31, lIKH, $4207.62
Year ended March 31, 1905, 4863.23
Year ended March 31, 1906, 5440.35
Representative McAlister, of Wayne,
has been suggested as an opponent of
Congressman E. J Bowers in the sixth
district, but he has not consented to run;
and there is not much likelihood that he
will do so, especially since Mr. Bowers
has been selected as chairman of the
democratic campaign committee, and it
is regarded as quite fitting that he
should again be given the endorsement
of his constituents. —Jackson News.
The Commercial Appeal asks, “Will
the next governor of Mississippi be able
to sign himself “Yours Truly?”
CASTOR IA
For Infants and Children.
The Kind You Have Always Bought
THE EASTER BONNET.
The glories of the Easter season have
come and gone, but the wonderful crea
tions of the milliner’s art are still with
us for further exhibition. The cost was
great, but in most cases necessary to
keep matrons and maids in good humor
for that great consummation of their
hopes for distinguished appearance.
It only remains to pay the bills of
those who bought upon credit, and to
think over the prodigious sum expended
by the American people. Over $200,-
OOOjOOO is expended every year by our
wives and daughters for millinery manu
factured in this country, besides the
millions for what is imported.
The tariff tax on such articles of
adornment increases the price of milli
nery', more than 5u per cent, on the
average, for the manufacturers are pro
tected by the tariff tax which is col
lected on imported millinery, so that
they can add to the price of the home
product about what the Imported arti
cles have to pay at the custom house.
Every woman, therefore, is interested
in the tariff question, for through the
protection it gives the American manu
facturer the cost of hats and bonnets
is increased quite 50 per cent. If the
present tariff rates on millinery were
reduced to 20 per cent., the women of
the country would save nearly one-third
of what they now pay for such articles,
whether imported or made in this coun
try', for the price of the American manu
factured goods would have to decline to
meet the reduced cost of the imported
article. It would be tedious to give all
the tariff rates on hats and bonnets, or
the many articles tnat go into the hats
and bonnets that are made up in this
country, but the tariff tax runs from 50
to 70 per cent, of the cost of the articles
in the country from which they are im
ported; so that if a hat cost $lO in
Paris, the tariff tax on it is from $5 to
ST, and as the cost is often much greater
than this, therefore the tariff tax is so
much greater in proportion.
• The protectionists tell us that we must
be walling to pay this import duty to
protect our manufacturers from foreign
competition and to protect American
labor in being paid higher wages than
the foreign laborer gets. The Demo
crats claim that to reduce the tariff to a
reasonable rate, would still give the
American laborer all the protection he
needs, while at the same time producing
enough revenue from customs duties to
run the government. Under such a
Democratic system the * rusts and com
bines that control so many articles of
necessity w'ould have to reduce the price
they charge, and the present high cost
of living would be greatly reduced.
Nearly everything we consume, or
wear, is protected by a high tariff rate,
and whether we buy imported articles
on which the government has collected
the duty, or similar home manufactured
articles, on which the trusts, combines,
or protected manufacturer has collected
the tax, by adding the tariff rate to their
profit, there is no escape from the high
prices which the tariff causes, and the
American consumer has to pay the bills.
Wives and mothers should talk this
over with the bread winners of the
family and urge them to vote for the
candidates of the party w'ho will vote to
revise this unreasonable tariff law that
taxes everyone unmercifully from the
cradle to the grave.
CASTORIA.
Bears the Kind Yo’j Have Always Bought
ANTHONY HOPE’S NEW STORY.
“Sophy of Kravonia,” Said to Be
More Thrilling Tnan “The Prisoner
of Zenda,” to Appear Serially.
Good news for lovers of stirring ro
mance ! Anthony Hope has w'ritten a
new story in the style of “The Prisoner
of Zenda”, and even surpassing it in
interest. It is called “Sophy of Kra
vonia” and is to appear exclusively in
The Sunday Magazine of the Chicago
Record-Herald, beginning April 22.
The mysterious country of Kravonia
lies in the same romantic region of
southern Europe as Zenda, but the new
story has no connection with that of the
famous Rudolph Rassendyll. Its cen
tral figure is a still more interesting
person—a courageous and beautiful her
oine, who rises from lowly life to the
throne. Sophy de Gruche is her name,
and she loves the brave, but unfortunate
Prince Sergius, as she proves in a series
of the most exciting events in modern
fiction. Her trials and triumphs are
due to the existence of two factions in
the court. One is loyal to the true heir
apparent, Prince Sergius, and the other
seeks to place upon the throne the little
son of Countess EUenburg, the king’s
morganatic wife. The conspiracy leads
to many dramatic scenes, one of the
most thrilling being that in which the
old king discovers the guilt of the
countess and drops dead at a moment
when things are in a perilous condition
for Sergius and his bride. How Sophy
comes out of this turmoil of intrigue,
battle, tears and joy, Anthony Hope re
veals in his own inimitable style.
The first installment of ‘‘Sophy of
Kravonia” will appear April 22. On
account of the great demand for this
fascinating story it will be wise to order
your copy of The Sunday Record
i Herald well in advance.
BAY SAINT LOUIS, MISSISSIPPI, SATURDAY, APRIL 21, 1906.
| CUT IT OUT.
Mississippi is rotten with politics.
The legislature is stirred up as bad as if
it w'ere a bee hive kicked over by a
mule. A large part of the press of the
State is as busy as a negro preacher
with yellow jackets in his pants,| and
the office seekers are trotting around
like road hogs.
Such a condition at this early date is
a disgrace to the Slate. To inject
into the State at this time a
heated campaign for all the offices from
constable to United States senator,
means that all other interests will be
relegated to the rear, and that industrial
activity will cease for nearly two years.
It is an undisputed fact that business
is always dull during election years;
therefore, the longer the public mind is
occupied with polities the longer the
dull season will be upon us. We have
scarcely recovered from the yellow fever
campaign, and now we are thrust into a
political campaign. When may we look
for an industrial campaign ?
If the State papers that are devoting
whole columns to advocating their
choice for senator, governor, or some
other job for some other fellow, would ,
devote the same time and space to
pointing out the natural advantages of
Mississippi for the investment of capi- j
tal in the various industries, and to the j
legislative needs of the State, they |
would serve the people to a much better
advantage. If the legislature would
“cut politics out” and get right down
to business, the financial condition of
tne State might be considerably im
proved.
The great trouble is, we put too much
stress on men instead of measures. We
assume the role of hero makeis and
worshipers rather than industrial devel
opers. Too many of us would rather
make a great big rich politician than a
great big rich State.
Cut it out; it is too early to begin the
campaign. Let’s have more business
and less politics.—McComb City Enter
prise.
HENRY LIENHARD DEAD.
Wealthy Lumber Manufacturer Suc
cumbs at His Home at Handsboro.
Henry Lienhard, one of the wealthiest
men in Mississippi, who recently
retired from active life after amass
ing a fortune in the lumber busi
ness, died at his home at Handsboro
Tuesday morning at 12:30 o’clock. He
was 72 years of age. The immediate
illness extended over a period of but ten
days, although Mr. Lienhard had been
subject to attacks from a malady seve
ral times.
Henry Lienhard was truly a self-made
man. Coming to America from Swit
zerland when quite a young man, he
built up one of the greatest industries
in the South without one cent of origi
nal capital. He came over on the same
ship with Henry Lochte, the well-known
broker and merchant of New Orleans,
and through all the years since leaving
the old country the two have remained
steadfast friends.
The funeral took place Tuesday after
noon at 3 o’clock, interment being made
in the Handsboro Cemetery. Rev. D. I.
Temple, of the Presbyterian Church,
performed the services. The pallbear
ers were J. F. Stuart, A. G. Loposer,
Henry Latimer, A. W. Loposer, John
Arthur and Will Reeves. The floral of
ferings were magnificent, and the casket
and grave were hidden beneath a wealth
of beautiful creations.
Mr. Lienhard was a native of Bilten
Ct., Glaarus, Switzerland. He em
; barked in the saw milling business at
Handsboro before the Civil War, and,
although his milling plant was twice
destroyed by fire, he managed to get a
new foothold each time. A few months
ago he sold his interests connected with
his milling business to the L. N. Dantz
ler Lumber Company, of Mosspoint,
which is now operated under the name
of the Handsboro Lumber Company.
Since retiring from active work in busi
ness, it was the intention of Mr. Lien-
To Beautify Your Complexion
IU TBU DATS, CSB
TRADING) LA
TKE UNEQUALED BEAUTIFIER.
(Formerly advertised and sold as Satinola.)
NADINOLA is guaranteed and money
refunded if it falls to remove freckles,
pimples, tan, sallowness, liver-spots, cofe?
discolorations, hlack-hcads disfiguring erup
tions, etc* in twenty days. Leaves tbe
skin clear, soft, healthy, and restores the
beauty of youth. Endorsed by thousands.
Price 50 cents and $4-00 at all leading
drug stores, or by mail. Prepared by
1 Ration*) TUt Cos., Paria, Toon*
hard to make life as comfortable as pos
sible in his declining years.
Mr. Lienhard is survived by his wife,
who was a native of Nordhausen, Prus
sia, to whom he was united about 1855,
and one daughter, who is the wife of
J. J. Harry, of Handsboro. The Sal
mon brothers, of Slidell, La , are his
nephews.
I ’
REUNION ANNOUNCEHENT.
Grand Entertainment in the Audito
rium on April 26.
New Orleans, La., April 16. —The en
tertainment committee of the United
Confederate Veterans’ reunion has is
sued the following announcement:
“In connection with the coming re
union at New Orleans there will be a
grand entertainment with many novel
features in the auditorium on Wednes
day night, April 25, and there will be a
monster ball in the same place on the
night of Thursday, April 26, with spe
cial old-fashioned dances for the vet
erans,
“To both of these functions all veter
ans and sons of veterans in uniform or
with badges and the ladies accompany
ing them will be admitted free, and alj
ladies identified with any of the Con
federate organizations will be similarly
admitted.
“Any particulars regarding these en
tertainments may be obtained from Mr.
V. O. Hart, chairman of committee, 134
Carondelet street. New Orleans, La.”
The old soldiers at the Beauvoir Home
are looking forward to a full enjoyment
of the reunion in New Orleans on the
25th, 26th and 27th of this month. The
L, & N. Railroad Company, through
Superintendent Charles Marshall, has
kindly agreed to transport the “Old
Boys” free of charge both ways.
Many of them feel that this, very prob
ably, will be the last time they will be
able to attend. —Biloxi Herald.
E. M. Barber, Jr., son of Hon. E. M.
Barber, of Biloxi, has been selected by
the committee in charge to recite an ap
propriate poem at the coming conven
tion of United Daughters of the Con
federacy, on June 12 and 13. Young
Mr. Barber will recite “The South Has
Nothing to Regret”.—Jackson Corre
spondence Times Democrat.
Mr. Nick Stratakos, of Guliport, was
a Saturday business visitor here. He
has leased the pavilion refreshment
stand at Anderson Park from the Pas
cagoula Street Railway and Power Com
pany. Mr. Stratakos is an experienced
confectioner and restaurateur. Mr, Jim
Thomas, also of Gulfport, will be in
charge.—Scranton Democrat-Star.
OASTORIA.
Bean the 1,19 Kind You Have Always Bough?
s ‘ in r
~aT NEWS SERVICE WITHOUT '
PARALLEL.
There is ample justification for the
claim made by The Chicago Record-
Herald that its readers enjoy every day
in the week, Sundays included, a news
service that is without parallel in range
and completeness. In addition to the
independent news facilities of The Rec
ord-Herald, that paper receives the
complete news service of the New York
Herald, the New York World and the
Associated Press, and, when it is con
sidered that its news columns are sup
plemented by all the special features so
popular with its thousands of readers, it
will be seen that The Record-Herald
holds a unique place among the great
newspapers of the United States.
NOTICE.
Is hereby given by the undersigned,
sheriff and tax-collector for Hancock
County, Miss., that the revenue laws of
1904 require all persons and corpora
tions doing business in this county, for
which a privilege tax must be paid, that
all individuals, firms and corporations
so liable must procure a license during
the month of May, 1906. Any one fail
ing to procure license during said
month of May shall be liable to double
the amount of the license then due.
J. E. SAUCIER,
Sheriff and Tax Collector.
Bay St. Louis, Miss. March 28, 1906.
L. A. deMontluzm,
Chemist | Pharmacist
- DEALER IN'
Drugs, Chemicals and Patent Medicines, Perfu
merv Toilet Articles Candles, Spectacles,
Fishing Tacltle, Etc.;
CIGARS AND TOBACCO.
SODA & MINERAL WATERS,
FRONT neai Main Streets,
BAY ST LOUIS, MISS.
PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY
Special Notice.
C. Zimmerman will be pleased to
meet any person desiring to erect
anything In the Cemetery from a
FOOT STONE to a MARBLE TOMB.
Prices are right and work first-class.
Correspondence solicited. Leave all
orders at the Hotel Pickwick, Bay St,
Louis, Miss.
A44W831
C. ZIMMERMAN,
Or. Algiers, La.
P. O. Box 100,
Me Donogh v i lle ,
Jeffrrsqn Parish, La.
v-r-sjgg
G. Zimmerman Is a member of Morvln Grove
No. ad. U. A. O. O.; Virginia Lodge No. 136, K.
P.i aa<4 Orange Qamp no. 8, W. O. W.
HIGH SCHOOL NOTES.
Friday, April 27, will be patron’s day,
and in the afternoon quite an extended
program will be rendered, consisting of
original speeches, declamations and a
debate on the question, Resolved, that
the United States should increase her
navy. Four boys take the affirmative
side; four young ladies represent the
negative.
Mr. Frank H. Lister was a visitor at
school on Friday and showed the boys
some new points in athletics.
Mr. Otis, of Logtown, manager of the
Weston Lumber Company, paid the
school an extended visit on last Friday,
and made a welcome address to the
school.
The seventh month closed to-day,
showing an enrollment of 207 pupils
and an average attendance of 173.
Miss Dora Scheib acted as substitute
teacher during the temporary absence
of Miss Kate Posey.
Miss Rosetta McGinn, who has been
a volunteer teacher, as well as a student,
at school this year, passed a most cred
itable examination before the County
School Board last Friday and Saturday,
making an average of 90 per cent. This
entitles her to teach in any school in
Hancock Countv.
Miss Mabel Cazeneuve and Profesor
T. L. Trawick were honored with a
place in the teachers’ meeting at Gulf
port last Saturday.
Missses Mary Benton, Johnnie Hart,
Mabel Cazeneuve, Bessie Hart, Ger
trude Cazeneuve, Rita Jordy, Gabrielle
Garvey, Rosetta McGinn, Professor T.
L. Trawick, Messrs. Gray Hickey, Billy
Barge, Arthur Miller and Dan Hickey
were among those who attended the
teachers’ meeting at Gulfport last Sat
urday. In the evening they also at
tended the field-day exercises.
ADVERTISED LETTERS.”
Letters in the Bay St. Louis Post
Office for the week ending April 15,1906,
will be sent to the Dead Letter Office, if
not called for in 15 days. To obtain
any of these letters, applicant must say
“advertised”, giving.date of list.
ladies’ list.
Mrs. Carrie Fricke, Mrs. H. L. Har
ris, Miss Maggie Johnson, Miss Mary
Ellen Mitchell, Mrs. M. Schofield, Mrs.
Anne Snyder.
GENTLEMEN’S LIST.
Joe Gains, Jim Hannon, James Hill,
Geo. P. Hall, Martin Schneider, Joe
Smith, James Williams.
Bay St. juouis, Miss.,
L. J. PIERNAS, P. M.
X. & N.
Louisville & Nashville R. R.
Double Daily Train Service
Through to — Chicago,
New York, Cincinnati,
Philadelphia, Louisville,
Baltimore, St. louis,
Washington, Birmingham,
Atlanta, Jackson vi lle .
Elegant Lighted i doing Cars
(Service “ala carte”.)
Elegant Keclining Chair Cars
(Seats free.)
Large Airy Drawing Koom
Sleeper? and Ladies’ Day
Coaches.
Trains leave Canal Street Sta
tion, New Orleans, at 9:25 a. in.
and 8:15 p. m.
Citv Ticket Office, 201 St.
Charles Street, New Orleans.
Chas. Marshall, Superinten
dent New Orleans and Mobile Di
vision.
A. E. Ladner, City Ticket Agt.
E. C. Runte, Citv Pass. Agt.
J. K. Ridgely, Div. Pass. Agt.
C. B. Compton, Traffic Mgr.
C. L. Stone, Gen. Pass. Agt.
Louisville, Ky.
44 what he want's right
awa I ** hy calling him
tc the ‘phone!” is an expres
tion often heard in business
circles.
AYhat do you suppose is
thought of you when it is
found that you can’t he
reached hy a modern meth
od.
A few dollars a year
'would place a Telephone at
your disposal and the service
offered by the
Cumberland Telephone
nnd Telegraph Cos.,
is unsurpassed.
Call central for particulars.
E. L. GrENIN, Mgr.'
, The Kind You Have Always Bought, and which has been,
in use for over 30 years, has borne the signature of
' —and has been made under his per
sonal supervision since its infancy*
Allow no one to deceive you in this.
AH Counterfeits, Imitations and “ Just-as-good” are but
Experiments that trifle with and endanger the health of
Infants and Children—Experience against Experiment.
What is CASTORIA
Castoria is a harmless substitute for Castor Oil, Pare
goric, Drops and Soothing Syrups. It is Pleasant. It
contains neither Opium, Morphine nor other Narcotio
substance. Its age is its guarantee. It destroys Worms
and allays Feverishness. It cures Diarrhoea and Wind
Colic. It relieves Teething Troubles, cures Constipation
and Flatulency. It assimilates the Food, regulates the
Stomach and Bowels, giving healthy and natural sleep.
.The Children’s Panacea—The Mother’s Friend.
GENUINE CASTORIA ALWAYS
Tie Kind You Have Always Bough L
In Use For Over 30 Years.
A THE CENTAUR COMPANY, TT MURRAY STREET. NEW YORR CITY.
WWtfW WWVW WWWW WVWVU WWWW WWW
PETER HELLWEGE. President. EUGENE H. ROBERTS, Vice President.
B JOSEPH F. CAZENEUVE, Cashier. PETER TUDUKY, Assistant Cashier. Ju
| Hancock County Bank, 5;
% BAY ST. LOUIS, MISS. %
t** __
B! NO ACCOUNT TOO SMALL FOR US 3b
DEPOSITS RECEIVED FROM $1 UPWARD
% YOUR ACCOUNT IS SOLICITED.
22 BOARD OF DIRECTORS. SE
"5b M WVLMSLEY PETER HELLWEGE CHAS. MARSHALL 11. S. WESTON i*?
35i ELMER NORTHROP JOS. F. CAZENEUVE, F. B. DUNBAR mQ
jm E. F. CARROLL J. V. DUNBAR, W. B, GILLICAN J. Q. FOUNTAIN
W. S. PETTIS, JR. E. H. HOFFMANN E. H. ROBERTS.
JOSEPH F. CAZENEUVE
*>* - ■ - -
BAY ST. LOUIS, MISSISSIPPI.
Liverpool and London and Globe Insur- Springfield Fire and Marine Insurance
ance Company, Company,
Southern Insurance Company of New Hartford Fire Insurance Company,
Orleans, Queen Insurance Company of America,
Nationa. Insurance Company of Hart-
Home Insurance Company of New York, tor . ’ . . ... . 0
Royal Insurance Company of Liverpool, Mississippi hire Association oi bena-
PhcEnix Insurance Company of Brook- tobia,
lyn, New York, Continental Insurance Company of New
Norwich Union Fire Insurance Society York.
Wes?em E S‘su n rance Company of Toron- Mißsi ffc 3 Insurano °
nto, Canada, 3 °*
UNITED STATES FIDELITY AND GUARANTY COMPANY.
/tjyPrompt and careful attention given to all business intrusted to us. Office At Hancoci
County Bank.
RIVIERA REALTY COMPANY.
LITTORAL PROPERTIES. TURPENTINE ORCHARDS. TIMBER LANDS. TRUCK FARMS
HADISON n. JAYNE, President.
Rooms i and 2 HARDY BLDG, UULFPORT, HISS.
E. F. RILEY, M. D., D. O. S. F. RILEY, D. O.
DRS. RILEY & RILEY,
O sto o p cYtliio
Will be in Bay Sc. Louis Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Office at
Judjre Breath’e residence. Consultation and examination free.
* *
ij TAKE ADVANTAGES OF LOW PRICES AN’P HAVE A M ; >1 >!vC\’ il 1 I
! Modern Sanitary Furnishings |£ f S f
• nes & kitchens g
• "4 IRON FENCING. Plain and Ornamental. ..
U Iron and Wire Work. Lawn Furniture, Fire Escapes, Window Guards, Etc., Etc. •;
a a. i /- „ —1 modern and up-to-date. Gas can be •)
% Acetylene VJ3.S iYlSCnineS, used for lighting, beating, Cooking.
VERY REASONABLE terms quoted to responsible parties, prices and general ®
q information furnished on application. •'
I p h o. n box-44. B. F. MARKET, Bay St. Louis, Miss. |
Gaston G. Gardebled,
Contractor *j}* Builder
Contracts taken for large jobs. Esti
mates made free, and plans and designs cheer
fully furnished. A liberal share of patronage
solicited. Orders left at Gardebled’s Drug Store
will receive prompt attention. Residence on
ilain, near comer loulflio streets.
THE ECHO’S
Job Print ing Department
Is Complete sad Ppte-iata.
POWER EQUIPPED.
Fifteenth Year. No. 15
When in need ol
WOOD
Ring up Telephone No. 70 and your order will be
properly attended to. No delay. Big measure.
Orders taken for Bricks,Lime, Cement, White
and Yellow Sand, and Charcoal
CONRAD SICK, Bay St. Louis Buck Yard"

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