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The sea coast echo. [volume] (Bay Saint Louis, Miss.) 1892-current, August 03, 1907, Image 1

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TVII PAPER IS
The Official Journal
-OP TUB—
CITY OF BAY ST. LOUIS.
Subscription: $1.50 Per Annum.
TO HAVE MONET IS GOOD; TO HAVE IT IN SAFETY IS BETTER,
SO DEPOSIT IT IN
The Merchants Bank
BAY ST- LOUIS. MlSS
and your money is safe and secure.
THE SAVING MAN SELDOM LACKS FRIENDS OR CREDIT. SO REMEMBER WE PAY
YOU TO SAVE. INQUIRE EOR OUR RATES. A STEEL SAVINGS
BANK FREE FOR THE USE OF DEPOSITORS.
INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS WRITTEN. SAFETY DEPOSIT
BOXES TO KEEP YOUR VALUABLES FROM FIRE & THIEVES.
DIRECTORS:
J A BREATH L. M. GEX CHAS. G. MOREAU
DR BOCER D> MONTT.UZIN H. H CORDON JNO. OSOINACH
JNO. K. EDWARDS J. O.
DEMOCRATIC NOMINEES.
FOR STATE SENATOR:
WILL T. MCDONALD.

FOR representative:
EMILE J. GEX
FOR CHANCERY AND CIRCUIT CLERK:
. E. H. HOFFMANN.
FOR SHERIFF AND TAX-COLLECTOR.
ALBERT J. CARVER
i
FOR TAX-ASSESSOR:
JOSEPH E. SAUCIER
FOR TREASURER:
ALCIDE MORAN
EOR SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION:
JOHN CRAFT
FOR COUNTT SURVEYOR.
E. S. DRAKE,
SOME NEWSPAPER EXPERIENCES.
For The Sea Coast Echo by Miss Mary Abarr, of
N. O. Dally Picayune Reportorlal Staff.
Relate some newspaper experiences,
did you say? Very well, here are some
that are not enjoyed by every newspaper
woman. Possibly, it is the perverse
ness of my nature, or, may be I am like
the Pharisee, different from other folks.
Anyway, it Is not every one that takes
a keen delight in doing all-around re
portorial work, especially the police
department; but I do. The man in the
prison cell does not come out the next
day in a column article and declare he
never said it, as some folks do who are
on the outside even, if you have a writ
ten interview dictated and corrected by
themselves. One’s words in cold type
do not look as they do written with pen
cil and paper without being well
smoothed with a little “soft-soap”. The
woman on the rock pile does not berate
you because you did not write up her
Paris gown as she thought it should be.
The police work gives one a chance
to stand up for the “under dog” by
giving his account of himself without
comment, and then the reporter who
wills is in position to lend a hand in
more ways than one to the unfortunate
ones.
Police work is a fertile field, and the
police reporter need neyer go empty
handed to his desk—aye, and such good
stories, too —stories that will make the
reader shed tears of sympathy; stories
that will touch the hearts and loosen
the purse strings for the unfortunate.
Of course, there are murders and sui
cides and accidents, and sometimes the
reporter may be called upon to help the
surgeon; but, with a heart full of sym
pathy and brotherly love for his fellow
man, even tihs, which to the casual
on-looker may be disagreeabel, becomes
a benediction of duty done.
The police reporter who is faithful
will never get left on a good item. If
he shows himself friendly, every man
in blue uniform will be his sworn friend,
and he had rather lose his star than to
let the paper go to press without put
ting his friend, the police reporter, on.
But you want some experiences. Here
are a few: One dusty August day a
most forlorn-looking woman was found
in a room in the top story of a
tenement. She was ragged and dirty
and sick, lying on a pile of rags in the
comer. She had been reported to the
police by some of her neighbors. A
phone message was received for me to
come to the police headquarters. The
Captain said: “There’s a good story
for you, I think, down on Washington
street,” and indicated the officer that
was to go there to investigate the case.
After much persuasion and even threats
of force, the woman consented to go to
the hospital. The fun began after she
was assigned to the ward. She had to
be undressed and sponged off by force.
Finally, her rags were replaced by a
clean white gown, and she was laid in a
spotless bed. In her hand she held, all
*hi* time, some filthy old garment and,
when she was put in bed, tucked it under
her clean pillow, but kept her hand on
ft. The attendant sought to take the
handle for the purpose of fumigating
and washing it with her other elothing.
The patient forgot her ailment and sat
bolt upright, holding the tighter her
boodle. It was taken away from her by
force, and tea jerk that wrenched it
from her grasp, unloosened it, and the
gold coins to the amount of nearly, or
quite, 15,000 rolled out over the ward
floor.
It was one of those years when dis
ease was abroad aad the fight on any
possible germ was made most persis
ontly. ...
Not many days After this I was pas
sing by the high board wall tnat en
closed the rock pile where prisoners
were required to work out their fines.
I heard women’s voices and went to the
officer in charge of these prisoners and
asked who was in there and if there
were any white women. I knew that
the negro women were in there for “ra
zor toting” almost without number.
There was no news in that.
“Yes,” said the officer, “wc have one
white woman in there, and you can
get a good item about her. Come in
and see her.”
She was pecking away listlessly, as
though she had neither heart nor soul
in life; that all the brightness had gone
out of it. It was a pitiful picture. I
sat down by her and asked her to let me
peck the rocks to pieces awhile, while
she rested. We had some merriment
over my awkwardness in the new role,
but I hammered away and encouraged
her to talk, and in a little while had her
story. She did tailor work, carrying
her sewing home with her to a wretched
room. Her husband was a dissipated
man and did uot like to work, but rather
spend his time with convivial compan
ions who had more time to talk to him
than his wife could spare. Among his
associates was a dissolute woman, on
whom he spent all the money he could
get hold of above that which he drank.
He brought her home with him, until
his wife, on one occasion, exasperated
beyond endurance, when he came in
cursing and abusing her and this woman
joined him, picked up a burning lamp
and hurled it at the couple. They ran
screaming, and the officer on the beat
came in just as the couple was escaping
and arrested the outraged wife, and she
was taken to jail and locked up, and the
charge of assault and battery was placed
against her. Her husband and the po
liceman sustained the charge, and she
was sent to the rock pile for thirty days.
She had been there ten days when I
called, but that was her last day.
I followed this little woman up for a
number of years. She was granted a
divorce from her husband and after
wards married again an honest, hard
working young man, and the last I knew
of them they were living happily in a
little cottage. They during this time
became Christians and joined the church
of which I was a member. The grati
tude of this woman for friendship ex
tended to her in her darkest hour is
something to be coveted by any one.
One morning at 1 o’clock a shooting
was reported in a negro quarter. I was
sent to get the account. The doctor ar
rived at the home of the wounded man
about the same time I did. It was a
frosty winter night, and the one-room
tenement had in it a red-hot stove close
to the wounded man’s bed, and the only
lamp was a small coal oil one with a
chimney so smoky that it shed only a
dim light. The doctor put on his white
apron, rolled up his sleeves and pro
ceeded to make the necessary prepara
tions for attending the patient. The
negro was mortally wounded. He had
been shot in the abdomen with a shot
gun loaded with slugs. It was an ugly,
ragged wound, and the liver and intes
tines had been perforated, necessitating
a long and painful operation. There
was nothing for me to do but hold the
lignt for the surgeon. Did I faint? No;
of course not. It was no time to faint.
I did my duty, and when it was all over,
I was exceedingly glad to get out into
the fresh air, away from the combined
odors of blood, the anaesthetic and the
descendant of Ham. The office was a
mile away, and in a short time 1 had
turned my copy in and did not delay the
paper.
On another occasion someone gave
me a tip on a murder that had been
committed nine miles down and across
the Mississippi river. 1 asked permis
sion of the city editor to be late, if need
be, at the staff meeting. Very early in
the morning I engaged a man to row me
to the place, a logging camp. There
were several families Jiving there, and I
engaged the women in conversation and
incidentally inquired about the mur
dered man. Yes; he had been there,
but that on last Saturday he with an
other had gone to Memphis, and they
had been drinking and that he fell out
of the skiff and was drowned.
“Are you a kin to Mr.— ?” was asked
me several times. No; I was not a kin,
but I knew people who bad known him.
Of course, I was interested In every
thing there was about the camp and
kept both men and women talking.
Little by little the whole story came out,
BAY SAINT LOUIS, MISSISSIPPI, SATURDAY, - AUGUST 8, 1907.
SOME QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS.
To the Editor of the Ski Coast Echo.
Dear Sir:
Please inform the writer in your next
edition of The Echo (questions and ans
wers the few “fool'’ questions
named below:
Ist. To whom does the beautiful yel
low-painted water wagon that adorns
the city hall grounds belong ? If to the
city, what was it purchased for?
2nd. Has the city of Bay St. Louis
any policemen employed? If so, how
many, and what are their duties ? Do
the city officials experience any diffi
culty in locating them —pay day ? How
on earth do they manage to keep track
of them ?
3rd. Has the city an ordinance pro
hibiting bicycle riding on the side
walks? If so, to whom does the ordi
nance apply ? horses or cows ? It cer
tainly does not apply to people; for
they are to be seen riding on the ban
quets daily.
■4th. Is there a law existing in our
city, where it says: “No baseball games
shall be allowed on the Sabbath ?’’ If
so, why do the city police allow a
gang of Sabbath breakers, with theip
hideous y ells and howls, to congregate
on the college grounds, right in the
heart of the city, every Sunday after
noon and play ball until nearly every
resident in the neighborhood is ready
to take to the woods, in order to get a
few minutes’ rest.
sth. Why is it. that when the citizens
and tax payers of a city or town ask to
have the city ordinances enforced, and
w town officials do their duty, the former
are classed as “kickers” ?
Now, Mr. Editor, the writer docs not
expect that you will be able to give ab
solutely correct rcplys to all of these
“fool” questions, especially question
No. 2; for he has already asked this
same question of no less than a dozen
business men and citizens and, to date,
has found no one in a position to give
a correct reply.
Trusting that you will succeed in
gathering all the data necessary to re
ply to the above in the columns of the
next issue of your valuable paper, and
thanking you in advance for the infor
mation asked, I beg to remain
Yours truly,
Ignoramus.

♦ ♦
Answer No. I.—The yellow wagon, a
necessity which no administration ever
seemed able to purchase until the pres
ent one took charge, belongs to the city
and has been paid for. It was purchased
to be used, but the valuation of property
in Bay St. Louis is generally under
rated, and the result is too little revenue
is derived to run the “water wagon”
regularly.
Answer No. 2.—The immense terri
tory and scattered population of the
city of Bay St. Louis make the sub
ject of police protection a difficult prob
lem. The present number is entirely
inadequate, and no complete results,
under these conditions, can reasonably
be expected. An adequate force is im
possible; the salaries for the number
and for efficient services would bank
rupt the city. By way of comment this
department would say that Chief of Po
lice Carver’s election to the sheriff’s
office this week is an endorsement of his
work. Under the various existing con
ditions the chief and his assistant have
done exceptionally well.
Answer No. 3. —Yes; there is an ordi
nance which regulates the running of
bicycles the same as any other vehicle.
Answer No. 4.—There is a State stat
ute prohibiting baseball playing on the
Sabbath, but there is no law against
“hideous yells and howls”.
Answer No. s,—This question does
not come within our province.
and they even showed me where the
murdered man was buried in the sands
close to the water, where every shifting
tide would wash out the ghastly object
o accuse the slayer. It was nearly
nightfall when I returned to the office.
But first of ail I told the sheriff, and by
the time my story was in print this offi
cial was close upon the heels of the
guilty man and a few hours later had
him secure in the county jail, to await
the action of the grand jury. The man
was duly tried, convicted of manslaugh
ter and sentenced to the penitentiary
for a term of years.
I could relate to you many, many ex
periences in newsgathering, but these
few are enough to give you some insight
into the duties of the police reporter.
No one should enter the newspaper field
without they are willing to cover any
and everything, from a dog fight, if need
be, to a diplomatic dinner. One who
enters into the work with his whole soul
will receive the approval, not only of
his employer, but also that of the read
ers of the paper. One may not be rich
in coin, but one will be rich in friends—
friends who will love them for them
selyes.
NOTICE TO TEACHERS.
Notice is hereby given to teachers that the
Board of School Trustees of the town of Wi.ve
snd wjll receive and consider application? for
one male teacher, Ist Grade; one lady teat her,
Ist gradp: one lady teacher, 2nd grade.
All applications must be addressed to E. Laizer.
ecretary school trustees of Waveiand Publics
School, P. O. Box 8, Waveiand. Miss , on or be
fore Monday 5, 1907.
I Certificate of teachers to accompany all ap
plications. LOUIS S. BOURGEOIS,'
E. Laizer, Secretary. Chairman.
Waveiand, July Ift 1907;'
Bears tbs Kind Ym Have Always tag?
.vifej&Sc rfofi■;*>&
* v - ‘. ’** * ■■■•'.
HONwCHAS^SCOTX
Excursion Rates North.
The annual excursion North this year
over the railroads will take place Au
gust IT to Sept. 1 inclusive. The usual
excursion rates will prevail.
These rates are the same on the Illi
nois Central, Queen & Crescent, Mobile
& Ohio, Southern and Louisville ft Nash
ville and two full weeks are allowed vis
itors to the north.
The round trip rates are as follows:
Chicago, sls, St. Louis sl2; Louisyille,
sl2; Cincinnati, sl4; Norforic, S2O; Hot
Springs, Va., slft s In addition to these
points the L. & N. and the Q ft CL make
the following rates: Monteagle, Tenn.,
$11.40; Tate Springs, Tenn., sl4; Ash
ville, N. C. f sl4; Hot Springs, N. C. f
sl4; Lake Toxaway $15.45.
Tickets will be strictly first-class and
on the L. & N., for accomodation of
those who do not care to use coaches
and at the same time do not care about
paying the standard Pullman rates, the
road has arranged to operate to certain
points the latest design of tourist sleep
ers in addition to the standard sleepers,
the cost of whicn will be about ohe-half
of the regular Pullman fare. These
sleepers are said to be clean, cool and
comfortable.
Outgoing trains on the Louisville and
Nashville are scheduled to leave New
Orleans at 9:15 a. m., and 8 and 8:46 p.
m. Trains will be run in sections ac
cording to the demands of the business.
OASTOniA.
Bears the TteKMYOU HtW AlWfl fatf
Anything to Sell? Anything to Buy?
SEE
ANSLEY,
REAL ESTATE AQENT,
AND BROKER
Room 2,
MERCHANTS BANK BUILDING,
Bay St. Louis, - - Miss.
/SMt. Have,yoaM indigestion)
CwMV/ Dyaj*epmim?jSiomaoh, Liver,
Honm Troubles or Constipation?
' v TM BtAI.OV3VSk ~4> CHYLO mu?CURE YOU.'
It is not a ready relief tool a permanent cute. Mtm thm Am# Oympapmtm Cure,
Chylo is not a patented medicine, bet is a prescription which has made famous one of the
world’s greatest stomach specialists, who has used it in his practice for 19 years, caring thous
ands from these dreadftU affectton*. Yam sssrf mat dM when taking OhjrNk
Every organ and tisane of the body depend cm the stomach for nourishment, and renewal
that will prepare it to perform satisfactorily its ftmction and resist disease. A strong digest
ion means good, rich Dlood; good blood means a strong, well nourished body, capable of
resisting disease. Chylo makes mire, fresh, red Mood, strengthens the nerves and cures all
disorders arising from non sdunUdkiu of the fbod. Chylo makes pale, nervous people well
ami strong. Ohyta jmamamtm JUmmmUmHlm because it cures Indigestion. Indigestion
is the cause of appendicitis because R causes the intestines to retain many irritating matters
which when not removed, produce this dreadfhl malady. No such matter can be retained
when Chylo is used. Therefore Chyle iaasasopreventive of appendicitis.
Chylo can be bad at your dntpgist, grieoWasata-
RRade only toy til# OHYLO CO., HO Calumot Ave., Chicago, 111.
1 1 ——"l • ■■■!
Send to THE ECHO foi% Printing.
We can take care of small and large
orders alike. Power equipped.
STATEMENT.
SHOWING THE CONDITION OF THE
iTerchants Bank,
of Bay St. Louis, Mississippi,
On June 26, 1907.
Published by direction of Chapter 14 of Missis
slppl Code of 1006.
RESOURCES.
Loans and discounts on personal en
dorsements, real estate, or collateral vm
securities 51213:58 65
Overdrafts secured and unsecured— 6.2251 11
Banking house 12.890 2
Furniture and fixtures, 2,470 77
Expenses 4,904 21
Taxes 405 05
Might excnange 20,481 86
Cash on hand 8,096 64
Total $176,807 24
LIABILITIES.
Capital paid In $ 20,000 00
Surplus 4,80 00
Undivided profits 7,002 61
Individual deposits, subject to check.. 71,041 63
Time certificates of deposit 53,963 00
Bills payable 20,000 00
Total $170,807 24
OF THE ABOVE AMOUNT OP LOANS AND DISCOUNTS
To officers dt the bank .$ 3,200 00
To directors of the bank 9,668 98
To stockholders of the bank 13,063 33
I. Geo. R. Rea, cashier of the Merchants Bank
of Bay St. Louis, Miss., do hereby certify that
the foregoing is a true, full and exact statement
of the assets and liabilities of said bank on the
day and date named therein, as shown by the
books of same. Geo. R. Rea, Cashier.
Sworn to and subscribed before me, a justice
of the peace, in and for the county of Hancock.
Mississippi, this, the sth dav of Julyl. 1907.
J. A. Breath, J. P.
Examined and found correct.
T. M. Henry, Auditor.
This Bth day of July, 1907.
NOTICE.
Notice Is hereby given that a regular meeting
of the County School Board will be held at my
office at the courthouse In Bay St. Louis on
Monday, July 29th, at 9 o'clock A. M.
W. W. STOCKSTILL,
Supt Education Hancock Cos.
SpSTORIA
H J^^^nfents^Ln^^hildreiu
Xtegelable PrcpMalionfor As- l AIWSJfS BOUjjll
slmilaling the Food andßetlula- ■ _ ~ #
togttKStoMdeattlßowelsof J BoaiS tllO /
“zsiszir! s&**** /J(y
ness anditestContains neither H p / Jf | f
Opium. Morphine nor Mineral H 01 /|\,\ 1/
WOT HARC OTIC. ■ lixlVr
n*ve *ouj*S4Mvamrmß I lf|
SsSa*. 1 I(\ lP* li<
HtmJM- I nil lyl
®2=?*=_J IA J[ II QQ
A perfect Remedy for Conslipa- H I II tal IIOD
Tion, Sour Stanch,Diarrhoea HI 14| r
Worms .Convulsions, Feverish- H I 1P _ „ A u||v
ness and Loss of Sleep. M \jP PM] IJyR|
Facsimile Signature of K
Thirty Years
. f CASTORIA
IvwwwwwwwvwMwuwywuv
Paint Facts I
Durability is The True Economy 4 of Paint, g
T MAKES PAINT MORE DURABLE. £
m ■ |m I # V IS TOUGH AND ELASTIC.
*5 m I m I WILL NOT CHALK; LEAD WILL. 2£
# I ml ■ IS NOT POISONOUS; LEAD IS. 5?
3 m ■ I m m .IS MUCH WHITER THAN LEAD, g
m VI I R COVERS ONE-THIRD MORE SUR- 2£
§ RUTCHERS DURABLE PAINT IS OVER A %
% FOURTH LEAD B T OVER 1-2 ZINC. £
3 Ready mixed paint is half paint and half oil. £
3 Rutchers Durable is nine-tenths paint not canned oil, S
g One gallon Rutchers makes 2 gallons mixed 'paint, 5
4| Over 100 Dealers in Mississippi. £
United States Government specifications upon request.
3 A. A.
3 St Louis, Baltimore, Toledo, Xew Orleans, Seattle. £
I JOS. 0. MAUFFRA Y, I
I SOLE AGENT. I
I BAY ST. LOUIS, MISS. I
ST. STANISLAUS COLLEGE, -
Bay St. Louis, Miss.
A boarding College conducted by the Brothers of the Sacred Heart,
fifty-two miles from New Orleans, on the Gulf Coast.
Course of Studies:
Preparatory, Commercial, Scientific and Classical.
LOCATION AND CLIMATE EXCEPTIONALLY GOOD.
For particulars, address the President. The 51th session begins
Tuesday, Sept. 3rd, 1907.
THOS. L EVANS,
I- •
pRUQQIST ...
Star Drug Store.
Fresh Drugs Toilet Soap, Perfumery, Sponges, etc. Try E/ans’ Liver
Regulator. A sure cure for all diseases of the liver.
ctllU Prescriptions compounded day or night. Orders by mail
Medicines. P rom P t ly attended to. Turpentine, Paints, Oils, Etc.
A FULL LINE OF FINE AND FANCY GOODS
THE ECHO'S
%
Job Printing Department
la CoapltteW Cp-to-Data.
POWER EQUIPPED.
-Sixteenth Tear. No. • SO.

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