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The sea coast echo. [volume] (Bay Saint Louis, Miss.) 1892-current, June 28, 1913, Image 1

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86074033/1913-06-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE ECHO IS
The Official Journal
OF THE
CITY OF BAY ST. LOUIS
Subscription: $1.50 per Annum.
fr=3CASTORIA
For Infants and Children.
|;j rASTQRM The Kind You Have
Hi ISsM Always Bought
j " ALCOHOL 3 PER CENT. : *
L o * S A\fcgc (able Preparation forAs-' M
tel aaaaaae Bearsthe a, a,
ill Signature ZAp
|f|c™ PromotesDigesttonjCheerfu!' n f A Alf
|.c ness and Resr.ComainsneiHw v* #l\ IM
Uc~9 t Opium. Morphine nor Mineral fi lllr
| Not Narcotic. I /LiJ
fej I I Y 1
Phmpkia Sted~ \mL _
t ff £n ! jUx-Senna * \ !#• a _
?§£-.* JhrMe Softs- I- % I fl
Kil-P jbtiseSeed * I A . II | f Iff
&§ SBS&*. ? ! \\ iil
Mfi Sr. | Jhk T P II a A
| /ff j. ||36
c 3R.- fi Apcrfect Remedy for ConsHpa- ff ■lf
Hon,SourStoraach.Dlarrtwea.' I l&s am
--a^ Worms .Convulsions .Feverish- \ Bv LAf 11110 Y
fcg?| ness andloss OF SLEEP.
P Jlwil Facsimile Signature of i ■ ff
pi: Thirty Years
Mg]: iiiilij ,UM,W
Exact Copy of Wrapper. THt m™** *o*~ny. yok cty.
L .
: ♦
: L. A, de Montluzin Sons, :
| DRUGrS, CHEMICALS, MEDICINES, ♦
t Fancy and Toilet Articles, Perfumery, ♦
J FINE STATIONERY, FISHING TACKLE, ETC. t
♦ ♦♦♦♦ ♦
♦ Physicß \is’ Prescriptions j
Carefully Compounded..... ♦
♦ ♦♦♦♦ ♦
♦ r **iThe Finest Line of Cigars, Tobacco, Pipe? and all kinds of Smoke rs* ♦
♦ Supplies in Bay St. Louis. ♦
♦ ♦♦♦♦ t
J Sole Agts.for Whitmans, Jacobs', Hiiyler’s J
and Facrst & Kramer's Oandies. ♦
♦ ♦
5 SOLE AGENT FOR VINOL. BAY ST. LOUIS, MISS. J
♦ ♦
<► {
I MERCHANTSi
5 t
I ♦
Are you making the most of your Telephone / J
♦ There are great business possibilities in the Tele- J
Z phone, but few merchants seem to realize it. They J
J take all the incoming calls, but forget that they could ♦
t call up customers and give advance information as }
♦ to new arrivals and other interesting news. A cus- 5
♦ tomer would appreciate this news, too. 5

| Cumberland Telephone and Telegraph Cos., Inc. *
: :
♦#>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦❖♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦J
CDmmissioner’s Sale.
Eslcilo Harbin Durham ]
vs, V No. 1733.
J. D. Chason, et al. J
By virtue of a decree of the Chancery
Court of Hancock county, Mississippi,
rea ! ire I in the above cause on the 22ud
day of May, 1913, ordering the sale of
the Und hereinafter described for par
tition, I, a. A. Kergosien, Gnaacery
Clary of said county, and duly appoint
ed a jccial Commissioner of the Cuanee
ry c >urc in said cause, will on MON
DAY, THE 7TH DAY OF JULY A. D.
1913, offer for sale at the front door of
the Courthouse, in the city of Bay St.
Louis, Mississippi, and sell to the
high iSt bidder for cash pursuant to
said decree for the purpose of said par
titioi for the following described pro
perty, to-wit:
Si > of n e *4, w Vg of s w of sec
tion To, n e *4 of section 31, n w >4' of s
e 4 , s;C of se>4 , sec. 31, e%ofn e> 4 of
see. di, sot sw *4 section 23, n% of
w ; 4 , aw±4of s e of section 2d, a
e>4wi a w >4, aw i 4 of n w >4, ne >4
ot s w 4, and w > 2 of s w>4 oi section
26, alt in township 5 south of range 14
west. ,
W 2of n w >4, section 17, township 5
soutli -f range 14 west, of n e >4
and n 3 % of s e >4, section 18, less Id
acres, 4w>4of a w a w of nw %
oi sec-on 9, township 6 south range lo
west.
Aloj a w >4 of n e &of section 17,
to was .up 5 south of range 15, also the
s e of ae% of sectioa 3 aad nw %
of n c 4of sectioa 4, and a e % of a e
% of section 25, a e >4 of s w % of sec
tion 31 towaship 6 south range 14 west.
All of said property being situated in
Hanc.ok county, and the btate of Mis
sissippi.
Wi-aess my hand and official seal,
this me 30th day of May, A. D. 1913.
[SEAL] A. A. KERGOSIEN,
ga-uisery Clerk aad Special Coai’r.
Commissioner’s Sale.
Mary Favre, et al )
. „ TS - „ , f No. 1633.
Leon Moran, et al. >
By virtue of a decree of the Chancery Court
of Hancock county, Mississippi, re iderei In the
aoove cau.se on me 21st day of Miy, A. D. 1913
ordering cae sale of tno laid hereinafter des
cnoed tor partition, 1, A. A. Kergosien, chanoe-
r S clerk of said county and duly appointed
special commissioner of the Cnanoery Court la
said will on dOMDAY, fHE 7PH DAY of
JCit\, A. D. mi-3, oitor for .-*aie at tne front door
of the Courthouse of said county, la the city of
tiay St. Louis, Mississippi, and sell to the high
est bidder for casn, pursuant to said degree, for
the purpose of said partition, tne following des
cribed property, to-wtt:
Beginning at tae norca-eait corner of the J.
B. Nuaise claim IVO. 33, section 2., township 7
Itange U west; thence .west 17 chains; thence
soutn to me southern ooundary line of said
claim; tnence southeasterly along sain bounda
ry ime of said ciaim to tne south-east corsfer
thereof; tnence aorta four onaias and fifty
Units; tnence aorta 3* degrees west 23 chains
and no links; tnence north oJ chains and 56 links
to tae place of beginning, containing 160 acres
excepting tnerefrom lot Mo. 1, a tract of land
containing 40 acres, more or less, known as lot
MO-1 of tne J. B. Micaise claim, now owned by
Mrs. AngeUne Nicassc. A par* of said land be
ing known as the Genevieve Micaise dower in
terest in tae J. B. Micaise claim.
Alt of sain property oeing situated in Jan cock
county ana Bwate of Mississippi.
Witness my aand and oiflmai seal this the SOth
I3eai.j day of May, A. D. 1913.
_ A- A. KERGO3IBN,
Chancery Clerk and special Oommissioaer.
Commissioner’s Sale of
Laud.
By virtue of a decree rendered on the lath day
of May, a. D. IdiJ. by tae Chancery Court of
Haacocic county, Mississippi, in case So. 1006, of
tae general docicat of said county, wherein Jos
01. cri-iswoid, wao sues by ais guardians, com
plainant, aan Joan Asner et als, defendants, the
undersigned special commissioner, wiU on MON
DAY, liitsl 7fH DAY Ur'JULY, A. D. isnj, the
same being tae first Monday of said month sell
ai.pabUo outcry to the mgaest bidder for cash,
berore the front door of the Courtuouse of said
county, in the city of Bay at. Couis, Mississippi,
wuniu legal flours, tae ianu lying aad being sit
uated in ilancocK county, Mississippi, and des-
OltOed dsCOllOWal
i£ast i-j of E 1-4 and S 1-2 of N El-4 of Sec
tion Jtf, lowosnip cs, jsouth of Kanga 15 West.
Witness my hand ana ohiciai seal tats the iilst
(Seal; day of May, iW’i.
A. A iM-WJObjUiiN, SpCOUI
BAY SAINT LOUIS, MISSISSIPPI, SATURDAY, JUNE 28, 1913.
DAT HIVE OF THE
LADIES OF MACCA
BEES CELEBRATE
Review and Visit From their
Chief, Miss Ella L. Marks,
With Banquet at the Klock
Hotel,Where Splendid Ser
vice Was Had--Stereopti
con Lecture at Fayard’s
Air Dome Saturday Night
By Miss Marks Was Well
Received--Maccabee Bene
fit Ball Tonight.
The past week has been a busy one
in the circles of the Maccabees of the
city. Bay St. Louis Hive No. 10 met
in regular review on Thursday of last
week, and much business of importance
was transacted. On Thursday night
the members enjoyed a banquet at the
Klock Hotel, and the. dining room
buzzed with busy Bees. The ladies
were indebted to the management for
the beautiful table decorations and the
kindly manner in which all arrange
ments were carried out. The course
dinner left nothing more to be desired,
and the event will long be remembered.
Miss Ella L. Marks, Deputy Supreme
Commander for Alabama, Mississippi,
Georgia, and Florida, was the guest of
honor and contributed much to the suc
cess of the gathering by her interesting
talk of the work of the Order through
out the states of the Southland. Mis
sissippi especially is to be congratulated
upon the good gain made during the
first six months of the year. She has
passed Georgia and Arizona and en
tered ‘‘Upper Class Five”.
The beautiful stereopticon lecture
was given at the Fayard Air Dome by
Miss Marks, D. S. C., on Saturday night
and enjoyed by fully four hundred
friends of the Order, who were loud in
their praise of the pictures given and
the discourse in the interest of the Or
der. Miss Marks has a strong voice and
was heard in all points of the large in
ciosure. She has many friends in the
dty, aside from the loyal members c.'
the local Hive.
Plans were completed for the ball to
be given on Saturday night, June 28th,
at the Maccabee (Firemen’s) Hail. This
promises to eclipse any previous ball
given and is under the joint manage
ment of the Knights and Ladies of the
Maccabees of the popular Tent and Hive
of the city. Visitors from a number of
the nearby points will be in attendance .
Miss Marks left for Gulfport on Mon
day, where she will spend several days,
visiting Biloxi as well, before leaving
for Alabama points.
|€fcurrij|
I Hof#* fl
SPECIAL UNION SERVICES.
We extend a cordial invitation to the
people of Bay St. Louis and visitors to
attend our special union services, which
will be held next Sunday at 11 a. m.
and 7:40 p. m. in the Methodist church.
We want you to meet with us, espe
cially you and your friends. Come,
and invite others to come with you!
We will sing the “Songs Our Mothers
Have Sung”. Can’t you help us? Ev
eryone is invited to join our choir to
sing these old, yet oeautiful songs.
Shall be glad to have the song, “Jesus
Wants Me for a Sunbeam,” by the
little folks.
Morning subject: “God’s Challenge
for a Man”.
Evemng subject: “What Will You
Do With Jesus?”
The sermons will be brief and the
singing fine. Come! May God bless
you! Carl Monroe O’Neal,
Baptist Pastor,
Biblical Eugenics.
The next meeting and last for the
summer will be held at the rectory,
Carroll avenue, on Tnursday evening
next, at 7.30 o’clock p. m. subject for
discussion: “Gan tne Lost Power of
Healing the Sick Be Recovered by the
Church?’' To be opened by the Rev.
Dr, Duffy; general discussion to fol
low. A cordial invitation is given to
all who read this notice. No ocner in
troduction needed. Visitors to tne Bay
particularly invited, Lignt refresh
ments at the close, served by Mrs.
Stockstill.
Christ Church Sunday Services: 11 a.
m. to 7.30 p. m.
Deputy Sheriff Randolph returned
from Gulfport Thursday afternoon with
John Jefferson, colored, charged with
grand larceny as the result of an alleg
ed theft at a farm owned by John Acken
near Kiln. Jefferson was safely lodged
behind the bars o! thecounty jail, where
he will spend the summer.
You Can Do It for 25c.
A few doses ORO guaranteed to cure Chilis
ami fever. Dead sbai for colds aad grip, rme
wiuc. No powoaa Acts ou fever ana powers.
Lg. Moaey Meg piss.
EUROPE STANDS ALOOF FROM CALIFOR
NIA EXPOSITION.
But one European power has accepted
the invitation to participate in the Pan
ama Exposition which is to be held in
San Francisco. France alone will be
represented with a national exhibit.
The ether powers are standing aloof.
This is an indication that the countries
of Europe, like most of the other coun
tries in the world, have grown tired of
expositions. The United States govern
ment will not be represented at San
Francisco with a nation.*! exhibit. Con
gress has declined to make the neces
sary appropriation for it.
Very seldom do such affairs pay. The
story of the Columbian Exposition in
Chicago is the story of the St. Louis
Exposition and similar ones held on a
smaller scale in Buffalo, Nashville,
Omaha and Seattle. The last-named
alone showed a slight profit, and this
was not entirely due to the exposition
itself.
The recent action of California in en
acting the alien land ownership bill at
once antagonized the Orient. It had
been planned by both Japan ana China
to make the most elaborate exhibits at
the Panama Exposition ever undertaken
in the United States before. It was a
matter of national pride which entered
into the plans of Japan. An unusual
amount of space for, and the
advance announcements interested the
entire country.
Japan has properly withdrawn from
the exposition and ill have nothing
more to do with it. China has done the
f
%
Breath’s.
A Complete Dry Goods
Store, popular with the
ladies and of equal service
MEN
of all tastes. Our line of
Shoes, Hats, Shirts, Ties,
Underwear, ect., is Com
plete and Up To Date in
every particular. We sell
3. V. D.
Underwear Garments.
Breath’s Dry Goods Store.
same thing. Germany explains the na
tional position in opposition to the ex
position on the ground that the discus
sion of the American tariff causes Ger
many to feel a little anxious about the
future commercial relations between
the two countries. This may be an ex
cuse, but is more than lively the true
reason. Russia is still offended over
the abrogation of the treaty of 1832 and
the general handling of the Hebrew
passport question. For this reason the
Russian government has declined to
participate in the Panama exposition.
England does not approve of the atti
tude of the United States to exempt
American coastwise vessels from the
payment of tolls through the Panama
Canal. This subject has yet to be de
cided. Germany nas yet to be assured
of the future peaceful commercial rela
tions, and anew treaty must be adopted
between the United States and Russia
before the intimate relationship between
the two can be restored. Japan must
be pacified and China must be concili
ated in many ways before this country
can expect their future co-operation in
expositions given on American soil.
It will be disappointing to California
that the exposition is foredoomed to
failure, but California is to blame for
the loss of the most important exhibit
contemplated.—Commercial Appeal.
no battleflagUallowed.
Orders have been issued directed to
the veterans of both armies tnat will
gather at Gettysburg next week, that
they must leave their old batcieflags
behind, and that no flag will be allowed
displayed upon the grounds but the
Stars and Stripes of a reunited country.
This order was issued in the hope of
keeping down any ill-feeling that might
be engendered between the members of
the two armies, who are extremely
touchy over the old tattered emblems
that they once followed to victory aud
defeat.
The 50,000 veterans who will assem
ble at Gettysburg will go there, not to
celebrate tne victories of battle, but
the victories of peace, and every pre
caution will be taken to prevent tne
stirring up of animosities which the
sight of tnese old Dattieflags mignt
bring about. While no one now douots
the fealty of tne memhers of either
army to the flag of tne nation, the
passage of years uas not dimmed their
love for the flags they once followed,
and any insult or jeering remark by a
thoughtless participant would be im
mediately resented, and thus what is
Intended for an event of the greatest
pleasure might be turned into one tnat
would tear apart tne wounds that have
been healing during the past half cen
tury.
These old soldiers who saw service
fifty years ago are now far advanced
towards the end of the journey of life,
and as an evidence that the War De
partment believes that that journey
will end tor many of them upon the
battlefield of Gettysburg, wnere so
many of their comrades fell in the
bloom *of youth, it has ordered that
200 coffins oe seat there, and that a
field hospital in cnarge oi twenty army
medical officers be established at a cost
of §25,000 to render ail aid to those who
may fad white participating in the
“hatUe of peace”. *
CHRIST’S POWE IT
CHOSEN AS THEME
BY DR. BALLARD.
Brilliant Discourse at Biloxi
Methodist Church on Sun
day by Well-Known Bay
St. Louis Layman —Chris-
tianity’s Influence in Build
ing Civilization Dealt
Forcefully With Benefit of
Foreign Missions —Spoke
to/ Veterans at Beauvoir
Sunday Afternoon.
Biloxi, June 23. Dr. J. C. Ballard,
of Bay St. Louis, lay leader of the
Methodist Episcopal Seashore District,
spoke to the large congregation at the
First Methodist Church in this city at
the eleven o’clock services yesterday
morning. His discourse was a brilliant
exposition of.the power of Christianity as
a supreme factor in the civilization and
uplift of the world and of foreign mis
sions as a continuance of the work of
Christ and, even from a material view,
as wonderfully potent factors in extend
ing the broadening influence of the
United States and building up its trade
in far-distant lands.
Dr. Ballard took as his text the words
of the Savior, “I am come that they
might have life, and that they might
have it more abundantly.”
LIFE FOR INDIVIDUALS AND NATIONS.
• Speaking of the mission of Christ in
giving a fuller life to man, he declared
he meant by a more abundant life that
they should have an overflowing life.
He brought to bear the facts of his story
in showing the advantages possessed by
the civilized nations of the Christian
world over the heathen nations and
dwelt with forcefulnesa and power upon
the indispensability of Christianity and
of its supreme potency i a working the
growth of mankind from the darkness
of chaos to the bright light of Christian
purity, steadfastness, and high ideals.
ABLE EXPOSITION OF VALUE OF FOREIGN
MISSIONS.
.. S
Dr. Ballard told of some of his ex
periences in the Filipines and in China,
in which lands he spent a number of
years, and by keen observation he was
able to carry conviction to the minds of
his hearers in the points he made.
After discussing the ethical and moral
side of foreign missions, he showed that
even from a business standpoint they
were of great value; that with the in
crease of the missionary spirit the hea
then countries became more enlightened
and were impregnated with higher ideals
and a higher standard of living, giving
scope for the trader on the heels of the
missionary, opening new markets for
the products of the Christian lands and
making new factories necessary to sup -
ply the trade of the newly-opened
countries. When the Chinaman finds
how much more comfortable his feet
feel in American shoes than in his
wooden shoes, he begins to save his
pennies to buy a pair of American
shoes.
OCCIDENT VERSUS ORIENT.
He spoke of the difficulty of impress
ing the Occidental thought upon the
Oriental mind and, in illustrating the
difference, told of the saying of Confu -
cius, woo advised his people substan
tially as follows; “Thou snalt not do
unto others what thou wouldst not have
them do unto you.” This was entirely
negative—merely to refrain from doing
something. It is in marked contradis
tinction to the golden rule of Christ! -
anity, “Do unto others as you would
tney should do unto you”. That is
pos tive and is indicative of the entire
positive force of the Christian ethics
and morality, against the passivity of
the Eastern cults and religions.
SERMON BY PRESIDING ELDER.
Dr. Ballard went to the Soldiers’
Home at Beauvoir yesterday afternoon
and delivered an able and inspiring ad
dress to a large congregation of tne old
soldiers. —Biloxi Herald. v
TO THE TEACHERS OF HANCOCK COUNTY.
There will be conducted at Wiggins,
Miss., beginning July tne 21st, a iour
weeks’ normal lor tne teacners of tne
tnree coast counties, namely: Hancoca,
Harrison and Jackson. We have been
successful in the normal for tne past
four years, and eaca year ormgs about
a better increase in attendance and in
terest. I want every teacner in Han
cock County this year to oe there, and
also tnose wno contemplate teaemng.
It will speak well for our county, and
we- v< ill nave tne pleasure of doing so
by holding up our end of the work. No
teacher can afford not to go, as it will
be most valuable time spent, and to tnis
end I urge you one and ah who lolloyv
tne profession to be on hand. I desire
to say tnat, in selecting teacners lor the
schools oi Hancock/ County, preference
wm be given those who attend some
normal. Further, the time is fast ap
proaching wnen none will oe able to se
cure positions in the puoiic schools who
fail to avail themselves of opportunities
for professional improvement.
JOHN C.iAFT,
County Supt. iSuuuation,
Boston Shoe
■■ ■ Sto ■■ ■
ANNOUNCEMENT TO OUR PATRON!! OF
BAY ST. LOUIS S SURROUNDING COUNTRY:
As it becomes necessary for us to vacate our
present premises we are selling Shoes Below Cost.
Now is your opportunity for getting excellent val
ues for a small amount.
Some of the makes of Shoes are as follows:
WALK-OVER, for men and women.
The EDUCATOR, for men, women and children.
THE RED CROSS, for women.
THE SOROSIS, for women.
The Yal and Dutteuhafer Sons’ Shoes.
Hole-Proof Hosiery, for men, women and
children. Now is the time to buy them
and stop darning. SIX Months’ guar
antee given with every 6 pairs.
Three Months’ Guarantee Given With Every Box of Silk Hose.
Boston Shoe Store,
Front Street, head of Main, Bay St. Louis, Miss.
TELEPHONE 62.
CASTOR IA
For Infants and Children.
The Kind You Han Always Bought
Bears the
Signature of C
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
W. W. STOCKSTILL,
ATTORNEY -AT-LAW.
Office—Opposite Courthouse. Tel. 130.
BAY ST. LOUIS, MISS.
Wir T. McDonald Carl Marshall
MCDONALD & MARSHALL.
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS
AT LAW.
Offices; —Hancock County Bank Bldg.
Lax ST LOUIS, MISS.
GEX A HARRISON,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW.
Will practive in all Civil matters
.n the State Courts , and in all mat
ters in the Federal Courts in Missis
iPP
EMILE J. GEX,
ATTORNEY-AT-LA W,
OFFICE -GEX BLDG., Main Stree
°AY Si. LOUIS. MISS.
ROBERT L. GENIN,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR
AT LAW,
Office —Genin Bldg., Main Street,
BAY ST. LOUIS. MISS.
DR. J. C. BALLARD,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
Telephone: 44,
BAY ST. LOUIS, MISS.
Office and Residence, Front Street, near
St. Stanislaus College.
M. A. RUSH, M. D.,
Office—Hancock County Bank Bldg.
Office Hours —10:30 to 12 a. m.
4 to 5 P. M.
Telephone—3l.
Residence -Main Street Neat Front
BAY ST. LOUIS, MISS.
DR. J. A. EVANS.
DENTIST,
Office:—ln Hancock Count j Bank
Building. Hours from 8 A. M. to
5:30 P. M.
BAT ST. LOUIS. MISS.
Stops Pain; Heals Wounds
ROY ALINE OIL is a GOOD PAIN MEDI
CINE as well as a GOOD ANTISEPTIC, Its
greater strength gives It greater power to ease
pain, inside or outside, man or beast, also makes
further, and therefore give LARGER
VAt.UE FOR THE MONEY. Pleasant, clean.
We, 35c, We. Money baok t£ not sattstacto
*3r
JPIBNTY-SECOND YEAR. No- 26
THE ECHO'S
Job Printing Department
It Complete wd Up4o4)tU
POWER EQUIPPED
—■ J
TO
Waynesville, N. C,,
AND RETURN,
$22.70.
Account of LAYMEN’S MISSION
ARY MOVEMENT M. E.
CHURCH, SOUTH.
Tickets sold JUNE 23 to 28, inch
Good returning until JULY 13, 1913.
For further information, see Ticket Agent.
F. L. OWEN,
Trav. Pass. Agent,
New Orleans, La.
Commissioner’s Sale of
Land.
By virtue of a decree rendered on the 22nd
day of May, A. D. 1913, by the Chancery Court
of Hancock County. Mississippi, in the case of
W. W Carre Cos , Ltd , va. Ignace Ladner et ala.,
No. 13U of the general docket of said county,
wherein W. W. Carre Cos., Ltd., complainants,
and Ignace Ladner et al., defendants, the under
signed Special Commissioner will on
MONDAY. THE 7th DAY OF JULY, A. D. 1913,
the same being the first Monday of said month,
sell to the highest bidder for cash before the
front door of the Courthouse of said County of
Hancock and State of Mississippi, within legal
hours, the Land lying and being in the County
of Hancock and State aforesaid and which is de
scribed as follows:
The North Half of Northeast Quarter and the
North Half of the Northwest Quarter tNI 2 of
NEI-4 andNl-2of NWI-4),in Section 4, Town
shi > 7, South of Range 14 West, Hancock County,
Mississippi.
Being the same land formerly sold by E. H.
Hoffmann as Special Commissioner to Ignace
Ladner, but not confirmed by the Chancellor,
and also known as the Edmond Ladner, Sr., Est.
laud.
Given under my hand and official seal this, the
7th, day of June, A. D. 1913.
ISealJ A. A. KERGOSIEN,
Special Commissioner
Commissioner’s Sale of
Land.
By virtue of a decree rendered on the 19thday
of May, A. D. 1913, by the Chancery Court of
Hancock county, Mississippi, In case No. 1741, of
the general docket of said county, wherein E.
Davis et ai who sues by t£elr next friend, com
plainants, and Pauline Davis, defendant, tne un
dersigned Special Commissioner will, on MON
DAY. THE 7TH DAY OF JULY, A. D. 1913.
the same being the first Monday of said montn,
sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for
cash, before the front door of me courthouse of
said county, in the city of Bay St. Louis, Miss.,
within legal hours, the laud lying and using in
the city of Bay St. Louis, county of Hancock,
and State of Mississippi, and which land is des
cribed as lot of land beginning at a
stake set on tne south line of Main street, at the
northwest corner of me lot of land now claimed
by Mrs. Mary R. Diettel. from thence on a
coarse north and) degrees west along me soutn
line of Main street 100 feet to a stage; from
thence on a course south 2ddegrees westiWO feet
more or less to me line deyldiug mis ime from
land formerly claimed by Jonn V. Toulme, now
Mrs. E. Davis, from thence on a course soutn 7u
degrees east along said dividing line iuo feet to
the south-west corner of lot of land now claim
ed by Mrs. R. Diettel; from thence on a course
norm 20 degrees east 200 feet more or less to a
stake set at the place of beginning. Bounded,
north by Main street, east by land of Mary R.
Diettel, south by land formerly owned by John
V. Touime, now claimed by Sylvia I’ouime and
others and Mary E. Davis, west by land of Jus.
F. Cazeueuve, being a lot measuring 30 feet
on south side of Mam street, lying between tne
homestead lot of Louis Laurent and me lot of
land herein described, being me cams land ac
quired by Henry H. Davis from Joseph F. Ciie
neuye on the 4tn day of June, mob.
This tne 2th day of May, a. D., 1913
Witnessed my hand and official s jal this th •
(Seal; day of May, A. D. 1913.
A. A. KERGOSIEN, Special Commisalooe
Card to the Public.
I beg to announce to the public that 1 have
moved my dental office from Bay Sc. Louis to
Kiln, where I am well equipped and prepared to
take care of ail practice intrusted to my care,
and soUoit a continuance or mat liberal patron
age of the past wnlch has meant so muon as aa
earnest of me cuotldenoe of the people.
I also cake this occasion to thank my patrons,.
My office at the Kiln is open every day.
Jwe nSf* J ’ * *B. .

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