OCR Interpretation


The sea coast echo. [volume] (Bay Saint Louis, Miss.) 1892-current, September 18, 1915, Image 1

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86074033/1915-09-18/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE ECHO IS
The Official Journal
OF THE
CITY OF BAY ST. LOUIS
Children Cry for Fletc^r’s
The Kind You Have Always Bought, and which has been
in use lor over 30 years, has borne the signature of—
and has been made under bis per
o soual supervision since its infancy.
/-Cmc/UACi Allow no one to deceive you in this.
All Counterfeits, Imitations and “ Just-as-good 99 are but
Experiments that trifle with and endanger the health of
Infants and Children—Experience against Experiment.
What is CASTOR IA
Castoria is a harmless substitute for Castor Oil, Pare
goric, Props and Soothing Syrups. It is pleasant. It
contains neither Opium, Morphine nor other Narcotic
substance. Its age is its guarantee. It destroys Worms
and allays Feverishness. For more than thirty years it
lias been in constant use for the relief of Constipation,
Fh dilency, Wind Colic, all Teething Troubles and
OiaArhoea. It regulates the Stomach and Bowels,
assimilates the Food, giving healthy and natural sleep. ‘
The ChUdren’s Panacea—The Mother’s Friend.
GENUINE CASTOR IA ALWAYS
Bears the Signature of
The Kind You Have Always Bought
In Use For Over 30 Years
THE CENTAUR C O M RAN Y, NEW YORK CITY.
J^iy is sick!
' r ' Prompt attention must be giv
en ailing stock so that farm work may not be delayed.
Bell Telephone Service on the farm enables you
to get the veterinary quickly.
It also keeps you in touch with the markets and
your neighbors.
If there is no telephone on your farm write to
day for our Free Booklet.
Address:-
Farmers* Line Department.
J CUMBERLAND TELEPHONE
' & TELEGRAPH COMPANY WRJ
incorporated
BOX 377, NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA.
* .
X ~ r ■ ■ 1 1 ■ ll 1 I .1 .. -II 1 "■ 11 ■'' 1 T Tl 11 -V
CONDENSED STATEMENT SHOWING THE CONDITION OF THE
i Hancock County Bank |
; J -
Bay St. Louis, Miss., |
i Mcunil Ti Biu: ISS AT P4S CiUISinAN, MISS., AMD PEARUNGTOM, MISS. |
| On May 1, 1915. |
I RESOURCES. %
| I
5 Loans and discounts $ ;H3T19.5'! N ■ ft
Overdrafts,. 220.62 jt.
Guaranty Fund UOOO 00 ft
Stocks, Bonds and Warrants 49317.28 ft
<S Banking Houses, furniture a fixtures 22,7*5.00 ft
5 Other Real Estate, 705.04 ft
5 Internal Revenue Stamps 92.48 ft
•\ Demand Loans secured by stocks and ft
5 bonds listed on the New York or 5
5 New Orleans stock exchanges, 37020.00 ft
5 Crsh and sight exchange 107181.17 •
; 01201.17 ft
Total... $ 564001.12 * i
i £
I LIABILITIES. I
* Capital paid In,. 4 30,000.00 ft
5 Surplus,.,.. 30,000.00
$ Undivided profits 11,531.31—§714-3141 ft
; Deposits, 49.2432.F7 ft
jg . Certified Cheeks, H-49 ft
5 Dividends anpv-id, 5.00 2?
( Total ...... $ 564001.12 |
i
<S I, Joseph F. Cazeneuve, Vice President and cashier of the Hancock County Bank, ft
of Bay St. Louis, Miss., do hereby certify that the foregoing,is a true, full and exact ft
i statement of ilu> assest Utilities of said bank including its branches at Pass Christian, ft
hS Miss., and Pearlingtoa, Miss on the day and date named therein, is shown by the books- ft
1 of same. JOS. F. CAZENEUVE, Vice President and Cashier. ft
| CAPL MARSHALL, DlrectoPß .\ |
•S CQRREGT —Attest; F. C BORDAGE3, Sr • \ ;
i| STATE OF MISSISSIPPI, HANCOCK COUNTY, >. “
E Sworn to and subscribed before me by Joseph F. Cazeneuve, Vide President and ft
| Cashier, this the. 12 day of May., A. D. 1915. M. E. Ansley, |
{SEAL] Notary- Pnblkt, Qeat No. 5.
~AY SAINT LOUIS, MISSISSIPPI, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1816.
THE JACKSON HIGHWAY AM) OVR CITY'S PIVOTAL
LOCATION
The Jackson Highway Convention is going to be held at Nashville, Tenn.,
on the 23rd and 24th of September, and the question to be discussed and finally
decided upon at that Convention is the final route of the Jackson Highway from
the Great Lakes to the City of New Orleans, La.
All points north of Nashville have practically been decided upon, and the
main issue is the route from Nashville to New Orleans. Th*re have been two
proposed routes into New Orleans; the first leading from Nashville to Decatur,
Ala., from Decatur to Birmingham, from Birmingham to Montgomery, from
Montgomery to Mobile, and into New Orleans through the Gulf Coast Towlfs.
The second proposed route is from Nashville to Hamilton, Ala,,from Hamil
ton to Columbus, Miss., from Columbus to Meridian, from Meridian to Hatties
burg, from Hattiesburg to Poplarville, from Poplarville to Covington, La., and
from Covington to Rigolets, La., into New Orleans, La,
The first route mentioned is two hundred miles longer than the second route,
and the Convention to be held at Nashville is to decide upon which of these
routes or any other routes suggested, should be adopted, and the adoption of the
highway route at this coming meeting will settle the question once and for all,
and the road will be built by whatever plans suggested and adopted by the
Convention.
Our city is on the longer route proposed and there is no question that there
wilt be a hard fight at the Convention to adopt the shorter route.
The Convention has sent out notices to the Board ot Mayor and Aldermen of
the City of Bay St. Louis, and the Board of Supervisors, calling their special
attention to the urgent need of delegates to the Convention to represent the
city and county in taking care of the interest of this locality.
It seems that both of these important bodies have ignored the request and no
delegates were appointed nor expenses appropriated for this purpose. All of
the Coast Towns have appointed delegates and provided for the payment of the
expenses to the Convention, and as usual Bay St. Louis is not taking interest
in the thing which will mean a great deal for the future oi‘ this county and city.
If we to lay dormant without any effort to acquire this highway and to permit
those individuals most actively to get the great highway running through their
towns, we will of course wonder at the reasons why they ignored us.
For some reason or other the business men and institutions of this town are
utterly lacking in co-operation and unity in the building and uplifting of the
community.
More interest should be taken along this line by the business man has been
demonstrated in the past. Private opinion has often been expressed regarding
the building of a road into New Orleans and what ought to be done with the
bridge across the Bay, but concerted action is a foreign element to the entire
population, and it seems as though the great opportunity now presented is going
to be passed up by all inhabitants of the city and county, and permit Poplar
ville, Covington and Hattiesburg to take away our long dreamed-of New Orleans
automobile highway. Again we often wonder why Pass Christian and Biloxi
get the bulk of the winter tourists and summer visitors, but we never stop to
blame ourselves for this. We wonder again that our indebtedness and taxes are
increasing while our revenue is decreasing, and again we fail to blame ourselves.
It is not The Echo’s intention to knock the town, because this is, in effect,
impossible. The town and county, with their natural advantages, are the only
factors that have saved the people and permitted us to go forward just a little.
But if human energy combined with natural advantages be used advantageously
we would be far in advance of any watering place and resort city in the United
States.
Bay St. Louis has no commercial club nor business league, absolutely noth
ing as a medium through which we could let the world know our city and coun
ty are on the map, and as a matter of fact the circular sent out on the Jackson
Highway, showing the towns on both routes, Bay St. Louis was absolutely left
off the map.
Asa suggestion, the logical thing to do under the present ci/cuinstances, if
not too late, is for the business people of town and county to -g- 1 together, in-
Hancock county* - ■—- - -■*•■=* -■- ‘ 7 7 ;:? >75:
If this were done probably the proposed route could be amende 1 so as to ac
complish something for this locality in amending one of the router so as to get
one of the routes to come from Hattiesburg and Gulfport into New Orleans,
instead of Hattiesburg to Poplarville, to Covington to New Orleans.
Let’s wake up!
7 —.— ... —i . - , .
mm The 3all Bearing, Long Wearing Typewriter V
1 W Typewriter for I
w the Rural Business Man 1
m Whether you are a small town merchant I
m or a farmer, you can’t afford to be without I
mj Typewritten letters and bills save your time and I
I give you a business standing you can get in no I
I The L. C. Smith & Bros, typewriter is especially f
I adapted to this work because it will stand more m
I wear and does not require an expert operator, m
I Anyone can learn to operate it in a short time, m
1 It is ball bearing throughout, simple, compact, M
V Mail this coupon today. ,
I L. C. SMITH & BROS. TYPEWRITER CO. B g
at Please send me your free book. gk
1i □I do not use a typewriter at present.
wW I I lam u-ing a typewriter and would like to learn about
na [I your special offer to exchange it for anew one. |
The Echo For
Printing.
NEWLY-CREATED PARK
COMMISSI MAKES
FIRST REPORT TO CITY
Mrs. W. L. Bourgeois, Pres
ident, Presents First Re
port, Addressed to Board
of Mayor and Aldermen,
And Offers Suggestions.
Mayor Capdepon, the Board of Aider
men concurring, recently appointed a
City Park Commission, of which his
honor, the mayor, is ex-officio member,
to take charge of the park surrounding
the city hall and to enter upon the
work of improving and beautifying the
grounds, for the general enhancement
it would give “the city beautiful,” to
stimulate civic pride, and, in a word, to
“fill a long-felt want.” The ladies ap
pointed, Mesdames W. L. Bourgeois,
G. E. Templet, R. C. Engman, Peter
Tudury, Paul J. Chauvet, public-spirit
ed and progressive, accepted the re
sponsibility, soon organized and al
ready have assumed an activity in the
premises of their prerogatives that un
mistakably spells b-u-s-i-n-e-s-s, and
through their president, Mrs. W. L.
Bourgeois, have submitted their first
report, whiph The Echo herewith pub
lishes in full, and which report the
Board of Mayor and Aldermen unani
mously adopted, we understand the
Mayor has already signified his inten
tion of adopting a number of the sug
gestions contained in the report and is
proceeding with his board to put the
same into execution, as the city’s fin
ances will permit. The report follows:
To the Honorable Board of Mayor and
Aldermen, city of Bay St. Louis:
Your committee appointed as the park
commissioners met Friday, Septemoer
3rd, pursuant to their appointment, and
went over the ground and considered
the needs of the City Park; and have
considered several recoraendations and
suggestions which we herewith submit
to your honorable Board for considera
tion. We realize the financial condi
great expenditure of money at this time,
and hayo tried to be as considerate as
possible; We have had in mind the
fact that the suggestions made by us
cannot be carried out, or carried into
effect all at one time. In acting as
commissioners we have borne in mind
the fact that the City of Bay St. Louis
wants a park that they could be proud
of, and something that would be in
keeping with the parks of other cities
of the size and prosperity of Bay St.
Louis. Not only should there be a
park for the people to gather for recrea
tion and amusement, but there should
be something at the park to appeal to
the public and bring them at a common
place for recreation and amuse
ment. W T ith all of these things in mind
we submit the following recommenda
tions: —
Along the North side of tlmpark on
outer walk we recommend thaca little
fence to consist of wooden posts, and
and the fence to be a chain running
through the posts the whole of the
length of that side of the park. We
have decided on this for the reason that
parents before they would bring their
children to the park would want some
sort of protection, and something to
keep the children away from the rail
road tracks, while we realize that this
fence would not of itself keep the
children away from the tracks, yet the
fence it being there would be apt to
keep the children from going beyond
its bounds. The fence will be cheap,
and an ornament for the park. The
fence posts could be painted either white
or green, which ever way the Board
would prefer. On the South side of
park next to the City Hall there is one
large cedar tree, which is leaning
towards a house. There is also a large
oak tree which was torn to pieces some
time ago by a strong wind. We recom
mend the taking or removing of these
two trees. The cedar tree is no orna
ment, and dangerous to the house next
to the park. The oak tree in its present
condition is of no ornament to the park
either. In addition to this, and the
principal reason why we recommend
the moving of said trees is because
there is so much shade around the park
that we have no place for the planting
of flowers, and if these two trees were
removed, it would give us somewhere
to plant our flowers. If the trees are
removed we suggest that a mound be
placed there, so we can plant flowers on
the mound. All this work can be done
with little money and by city labor.
In all parks that we had occasion to see,
and visit we found swings, see-saws,
etc., and this amuse the children. We
respectfully suggest that as soon as
practicable that the City have placed,
see-saws, and swings on the grounds.
Swings that could be put up for very
little cost, could be made with upright
posts with horizontal posts over these
posts on which the swings could he
bung, so that they would not swing
too high, would be -Utaole to begin
with. On the side of the swings,
horizontal bars could be put up for the
young boys to exercise. This could be
done with comparatively very little cost.
In the future yard swings, etc.,could be
put there if necessay. We also suggest
that for the electric light that is now on
the grounds, that a stand that would be
an ornament to the park be put there.
This might be bought for small cost.
For the people that visit the park, it
would be necessary to have some sort
of way for them to obtain water to
drink. We suggest a sanitary faucet,
and we suggest this for the reason that
if a plain faucet were used water would
be permitted to run all over the grounds,
and if a plain faucet were used, cups and
and glasses could not be used for the
reason that the State Law prohibits the
using of cups and glasses. The scheme
that we have in mind would be a sani
tary faucet where no cups and glasses
need be used and the water could be
gotten by means of a pedal that would
stop the flow of water as soon as the
pedal is released, after the drinker has
obtained his fill. The next recommenda
tion that we wish to make, and is one
that may sound extravagant; but in
our opinion it is one that is badly
needed and would prove of great advant
age to the City Park, and that is music.
In order to meet this, there are two
plans that are feasible. One is to see
the Brothers, and see if they would not
let the College Boys play on Wednes
day nights for the City; but this of
course, would have its objectional
features, for the reaoon that after the
College closes, which would be the latter
part of June, there would be no music
for the summer months, and this is the
time that the music would be most
needed. The other plan would be for
the City to get music. The Legislature
some time ago passed a law that each
City and and town could appropriate
SIOO.OO or as much therefore as they
thought advisable for the purpose of
encouraging a brass band, and at the
same time get music for its parks. We
have in mind to get flowers and seeds
free for the City, and will see that
the same are planted in the proper
places.
We have given you our views on some
needs of th* Park. You might adopt
anyone recommended, and we shall do
our part.
Respectfully submitted,
CITY PARK COMMISSIONERS,
- .' W. I . Bouryeoia,
tmmttfi ~tti Tiji
IsMm Wti*. *wces #
office hours, in the Gex Building, Main
street, will be on Mondays and Fridays,
from 10a. m. to 4:30 p. m. His patients
and future patrons will govern them
selves accordingly. Tel. 138. L
Let us interact you either in a HUP or GRANT
Car. These are among the most popular and
best cars made. You cannot get better for the
price; let ns show you; a demonstration costs
nothing, and will not obligate yon to buy. Ad*
dress Co-Operative Garage Cos. Phone 6.
Dr, J. Q. Landrum, dentist, formerly
of this city, but now residing at the
Kiln, begs to announce to his friends
and former patrons that he will be in
Bay St. Louis, at the Gex Build
ing, on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thurs
day and Saturdays.—Adv.
DR. C. L. HORTON,
Physician and Surgeon,
Office: GEX BLDG., Main t-, Hours 10 to 11
A. M. and 4t05 P. M Telephone 82
Residence—Carroll avenue, Phone 82.
At Power’s Drug Store, Phone 189.
DR. HAMPDEN S. LEWIS,
KSS:}^ox.,Mi. e .
Office Hours:
9 to 12 A. M.--3 to 6 P. M.
Office ’phone 68. Residence ’phone 692
ROBERT L. GENIN,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR
AT LAW,
Office—Genin Bldg., Main Street,
BAY ST. LOUIS, MISS.
Will T. McDonald. Carl Marshal
MCDONALD & MARSHALL.
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELLORS
AT LAW.
Offices; —Hancock County Bank Bldg.
BAY ST. LOUIS, MISS.
EMILE J. GEX,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
OFFICE -GEX BLDG., Main Street
BAY ST. LOUIS, MISS.
DR. J. A. EVANS,
DENTIST,
Office. —In Hancock County Bank
Building. Hours fro* 8 A. M. to
5:30 P. M.
BAY ST. LOUIS. MISS.
GEX & HARRISON,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,
Will practice in ail civil matters in
all State Courts and in all matters in the
General Courts inMississippi.
CABBAGE PLANTS.
Leading varieties for fall heading;
good stocay plants. 30c per 100; 50u
$1.25; IUOJ $2-50; 500 u at 52.25 per 1000;
10,000 at $2.00 per thousand, F. O. B
Bay tft. Louis. JOB BiiKBUBTTO.
TWENTY-FOURTH TEAR. No. 33
THE ECHO’S
Job Printing Department
la C—uille si
POWER EQUIPPED
- I
O ■ < ► ’
;; A Word to the ; I
j? Borrower |j
► ******®****®® ( ,
ClFyoutni bof- '
rower of this < ,
paper, don’t you < >
think It U an In- j *
Justice to the man who Is , ,
< ► paying for It? Ha maybe < *
; ' looking for it at thla very ; ;
, , moment. Make It a rag- , ,
< ► ular vial tor to jrour home. < >
; \ The aubacription prioa la { [
, I an investment that will , ,
< ► repay you welL <
ae ttttttttoatttattasa a#
\” -< >
PASS TEAM SCORES
VICTORY Oil BAY ST.
LOUIS DIAMOND.
Toca Nine, One of the Best
Teams on Coast Plays Last
Game of Season With A
Pick of the Coast—Score
54—Excitement Galore.
The Toca Team of Bay St. Louis
played the last game of the season last
Sunday and was defeated by a score of
sto 4 by the Pass team, one of the
hardest aggregation of ball tossers to
beat.
The members of the Pass team came
over with one thing uppermost in their
minds, and that was a double-binged
determination to win—and they certain
ly did win! They brought with them
the “pick of the Coast,” while Bay St.
Louis was prepared too, but alas and
alack, not sufficiently as the final out
come proved,
The pitching of Luc was very poor;
Sunday seemed tojhave been hi* off day,
and did not seem to have much stuff on
i the
visitors (Gulfport) gave up the most
hits, but kept them scattered except in
one inning which caused three runs
against his team.
B. Simpson,the first man to face Luc's
delivery slammed one over of Luc’s slow
ball for two bases. Also Goodaon, af
ter .haying (wo strikes against him
slammed one over right field fence for
a two base hit.
TOO MUCH WRANGLING.
The game was played very well at
times, but there was entirely too much
wrangling, causing many of the specta
tors to leave before the game was over.
About one hour and fifty minutes was
spent playing ball and almost two
hours in unconventional conversation.
More umpires were put out in that one
game than were put out all during the
season, as the reader who was at the
fiasco can vouch for. It appears to have
been more of a burlesque game than
anything else but a ball game. The
umpiring by the Blaize brothers—R,
Blaize of Pass Christian and R. Blaize
of Bay St. Louis, finally and thankful
ly brought the game to a termination.
STANLEY BECK.
The price of the DODGE Tourist Car or Road*
•ter, complete, ia only $785, The wkeelbaee
i* 110 incite*. The best and meat complete car
for the money. See J. R. GRIMSHAW at the
Co-Operative Garage Company for farther par
icnlart.
TRUSTEE’S SALE.
By virtue of authority conferred upon
me and under the provisions of a cer
tain deed of trust made by Elizabeth
Gaspard and S. N. Gaspard, dated
April 16, 1914, to secure a certain in
debtedness to the Merchants Bank, and
which deed of trust is recorded in Vol
8, pages 481-483, of the Records of
Mortgages and Deeds of Trust on L*nd
in the Chancery Clerk’s office of Han
cock county, Mississippi, I, the under
signed, will, on Monday, the
4TH DAY OF OCTOBER, 1915,
sell at public outcry to the highest bid
der for cash before the front door of
the court house of said county and State
within legal hours, the following des
cribed lands:
A lot of land fronting on the western
line of Dunbar avenue, and running
hack between parallel lines 60 feet
apart, oa a course north 70 degrees
west 300 feet to the line dividing this
lot from land of M. T. Toulme. Bound
ed on the north by land of M. T. Toul
me, and south by land of J. A. de Mon
tluzin. And may be known as Lot 114
First Ward, as per a map of said city
made by J. L. Henderson, filed m the
office of the clerk of the Chancery
Court of said county, on January 6th
1902. Being the identical land convey
ed by Catherine B. Apply et ux to the
undersigned Elizabeth Gaspard, (then
Elizabeth Patenotte), by deed dated
June 17th, 1912,recorded in Volume C -4
pages 486-469, Records of Deeds of said
county.
Said property being sold to satisfy
the debt secured by said deed of trust
together with costs, the conditions of
said deed of trust having been broken
and the trustee requested by the bolder
of the note to foreclose.
_ RBA. Trust..,
Sy 9(. irtUUi Miw.) Sept, , m,
<i

xml | txt