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The sea coast echo. [volume] (Bay Saint Louis, Miss.) 1892-current, October 26, 1918, Image 1

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86074033/1918-10-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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W\K SAVINGS STAMPS
ISSUED BY THE
TED STATES GOVERNMENT
Subscription: $2.00 per Annum, in advance.
GASTORIA
j For Infants and Children.
Mottiers Know That
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Exact Copy of Wrapper. TMt ce*Tun company, Ntw YORK CITY.
Mobilizing a Nat^^^j
Fighting Strength
Great military cities have sprung up all oyer I
the land * and linking these training camps avia- j
tion fields, coast defenses, naval stations and even
most remote points where our forces are. gather- I
ing is the Universal Bell Telephone system hnk
-1 ing each with the other and all with the depart
ments at Washington. I
Upon the declaration of war the Bell sy ste I
was placed unreservedly at the disposal of the I
Government, whose already enormous demands
for telephone service are continually increasing. I
Likewise unprecedented are the service require
meTts of private business, which necessarily must
be subordinated in times of emergency. I
So far as the local service is concerned we are I
not only unable to increase our revenue by ac- I
cepting a volume of new business, but we are
in P thc awkward position of seeing our sen-ice I
suffer and our present patrons inconvenienced.
The delays and inconveniences due to the conger 1
tion are more embarrassing to us than to the I
\ public. I
Any sacrifice we may make is accepted cheer- I
iully and if our difficulties are reflected in Y Ol I
telephone service, we ask that you bear this i I
mind. j
■ ■ The patriotic American public can co-operate I
.post effectively with th %^ e ™"l"i^ dlscour ‘ [
unnecessary use of the telephone.
Cumberland telephone
AND v telegraph compa/y |M|
Incorporated
(Advertisement.)
Office of Secretary of State,
Jackson, Miss., October 10, 1918.
PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO
THE CONSTITUTION OF THE
STATE OF MISSISSIPPI.
At a regular session of the Legis
lature of the State of Mississippi,
held in January, February and March,
1918, one concurrent resolution was
adopted submitting to the qualified
electors of the State for ratificaion or
rejection at an election to be held
o n Tuesday after the first Monday
jn November, 1918, being the sth
<iav of November, 1918, amendment
to‘Section 112 of the State Constitu
tion, which amendment is in words
and figures following, to-wit:
A Concurrent Resolution co a
— end Section 11*2 of the Constitution
of the State of Mississippi so as to
provide for a classifide property tax.
Resolved by thp Legislature of the
State of Mississippi, two-thirds of
the Senate and House agreeing there
to, that the following amendment to
' the Constitution of th e State of Mis
sissippi be submitted to the qualifide
‘ electors of this State for ratificaion
0 - rejection at an election to b e held
* , he first Tuesday after the first
Monday * n November, A. D. 1918,
zvi * ,
Amend Section 112 of th e C,onstu
tution of the Stole of Mississippi so
that it will read as fo llov * s -
SECTION Xl2. The power of tax
ation shall never be surrendered, sus
pended, or contracted away. Ail
taxes shall be uniform *pon trie same
class of property within territorial
limits of the authority levying the
tax, and shall be levied and collected
for public purposes only, but proper
ty shall never b P assessed for taxes
for mor P than its true value. The Le
gislature shall hav P power to divide
property into classes for the purpose
of taxation. The Legislature may
impose a per capita tax upon such
domestic animals as from their na*
tur P and habits are destructive of
1 property. All exemptions shall be
by general law. The Legislature may
provide for a special mode of assess
ment for railroads, and other public
service corporate property, or for
' particular speniec of property be
BAY ST. LOUIS, MISSISSIPPI, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1918.
MUCH GULF LAND
READY ID BECOME
SOLDIERS 1 FARMS.
V
Federal Grants of Tracts in Hancock,
Harrison, Jackson and Pearl
River Counties
SHOULD SIMPLIFY MATTER.
Land Records of Three Coast Coun
ties Make Interesting Showing
—Chance for Soldiers.
Bay St. Louis, Miss., Oct. 20—Four
counties in tne Guif Coast section of
xuississippi are in position to take
advantage oi tne plan of Franklin K.
secretary of the interior, to
lUiinsh iarm s to the returning sol
diers wnen tne war is ended.
Examination oi the records shows
that a fration over 47,000 acres of
puoiic land will be available in Han
cock, L'earl River, Harrison and Jack
son counties and can be used for es
tablishing two or more large colonies
of soldiers.
i mrty thousand acres of w r hat is
known as public school land is located
in Hancock and Pearl River counties,
near the line of the New Orleans and
Northeastern Railroad. Over 16,-
ouu acres of land that is owned by the
University of Mississippi is in Harri
son and Jackson counties, about 20
miles due north of Biloxi and Ocean
Springs.
Ail of this land w r as donated to the
State of Mississippi by the Federal
government many years ago, with
the stipulation that tne proceeds from
sales or leases was to be used for ed
ucational purposes. The land never
has been sold or leased, and the
Statp is in position either to turn it
back to the Federal government or
to join in any plan that may be de
vised for furnishing homes for the
soldiers when peace is restored.
An interesting bit of history is re
vealed in the records concerning the
tract of 30,000 acres of public school
land in Hancock county and Pearl
River county. a
Early in the last century the Unit
ed States government gave the six
teenth section of land in every town
ship in certain States for public
school purposes for the benefit of
that township. A section of land
contains 640 acres, and it was the in
tention of th P government t 0 give
each township 640 acres.
It so happended in Mississippi that
in many instances the sixteenth sec
tions of land did not contain 640
acres. In some cases the government
previously had granted the land to
homesteaders, soldiers or Indians, or
the land had been occupied through
some old Spanish grant that was rec
ognized by the Government, and in
other cases sixteenth sections were
covered by bodies of water. It also
happened, because of closing lines
of surveys, many sixteenth sections
were short of a few acres.
Therefore, to make up the deficien
cy other lands were granted to these
townships. The government, which
owned a large pjuantity of land in
Hancock county, figured that th e en
trei shortage for all the townships in
the State totaled 30,829 acres, and
hat amount of land in this county
was feet aside in a solid body. THis
vast tract now isknown as “lieu”
lands.
SELLING OUT DAIRY FARM.
Selling out dairy farm, stock and
equipment, on Waveland Road, five
miles from Bay St. Louis, Miss.
I offer remaining stock for Jt>4so.
or will sell separately—l Jersey-
Holstein cow, 8 years, fresh in Nov.
1 registered Jersey, 9 years, due in
January. 1 graded Jersey, 6 years,
due in January. 1 graded Jersey, 5
years, due in March. 1 graded Jer
sev, 15 years, not bred. 1 registered
Jersey bull, of highest lineage, worth
?300, for $l5O. Also the larm, in
-<y r,ne new large barn, silo and
milk house. Farm and everything in
entcries S6OOO and over. Will take
Orphic offer. Death cause
of wanting to sell. Apply to
H. A. BUSHNELL, Waveland P ;
Miss.
NOTICE.
The dental office of Dr. J. A.
Evans will be closed during the
nonth of November.
i „ I..—— "" '*
NOTICE.
Dr. J. H. Spence announces that
.e will bp in his office in Gex 81dg..,
■h da ’ (except Tuesdays) during
the month of November. Hours —
10 A. M. to 5 P. M.
longing to persons, corporations or
asociations.
Passed the Senate February 28th,
1918; March sth, 1918; March 6th,
1918.
Tho following amendment to the
Constitution is submitted under the
Initiative article pi* iht?
for adaoption or rejection.
Be it resolved by the people of the
State of Mississippi that Section 117
of the Constitution of he Sae of Mis
sissippi, be and he same is hereby
amended to read as follows:
117. The Governor shall
be jt feaft twenty-one years of age
and shaft have h citizen of the
United states twenty years, i*nd shall
have resided in this State hve years
next preceding the day of his elect
lion.
And the sam P is published and will
be submitted as required by Section
273 of the State Constitution.
Given under my hand and he Great
Seal of the State of Mississippi, this
lOtfc day of October, 1918.
JOSEPH W. POWERS,
Secretory fil State.
ECHOS FROM WAR
WORK CONVENTION
District One, Comprising Coast Coun
ties, Assigned Quota of Approx
imately $30,000.
GULFPORT
P. O. Colson, Y. M. C. A. secretary,
who is organizing the caostal section
for the coming drive for war tvork
funds, attended the recent war work
convention in -'ackson, which he pro
nounced the “biggest thing of its kind
ever held in the state. Mr. Colson is
attached to Camp Shelby at Hatties
burg, but is now making Gulfport his
headquarters. Speaking of the con
vention, he said:
The State United War Work Con*
vention in *ackso n was the biggest
thing of its kind ever held in the
state. It was probably the largest at
tendend patriotic meeting ever held
in Mississippi. All the many people
who attended from the coast counties
returned with words of praise upon
their lip s and hearts and minds filled
with increased enthusiasm and inspir
ation for the cause of the United War
work. Nearly a housand delegates
including the most prominent people
in the state were present. The Gallo
way Memorial Church, said to begone
of the largestauditoriums in the state,
wa s packed and a thousand people
contributed an overflow crowd who
came to hear Gypsy Smith the famous
English Y. M. C. A. worker in France.
Leroy Percy, who is just back from
France, deliveredv* powerful address
to the same audience. Mr. Percy is
state chairman of the United War
Work organization. The speakers held
the great throng for three hours and
were loudly cheered every few min
utes as they related the heroic deeds
of our boys over there and the won
derful things accomplished by the
Allied government.
The audiences for the two days and
night were composed of Protestants,
Catholics and Jews. There was per
fect harmony and a most beautiful
spirit of co-operation pervaded the
whole convention. All the delegates
from the seven organizations were
there for on e and only one purpose—
to learn how they might better serve
our American fighting men over
there. Each organization had a prom
inent speaker who gave an inspiring
address pledging th e unqualified co
operation of his organization in help
ing to raise the $700,000 in Mis
sissippi.
District one, which includes Harri
son, Jackson, Hancock and Stone
counties, was assigned a quota of
approximately $30,000. Harrisonsls,-
000; Jackson, $7,500; Hancock,
$4,550 and Stone $3,000.
The drive proper comes Nov. 11-18.
Big county conventions ..nil held
on November 4,5, 6 and 7 in the
counties as named above.
The following people attended the
convention at Jackson;
Harrison County:—Mr. and Mrs.
B. E. Easton, Mayor Geo. M. Foote,
A. G. Clinger, Gulfport; Judge W- A.
White, Biloxi; J. M. Harison, Gulf
port; R. L. Simpson, Miss Hazel Sut
ton, M. H. Daniel, Gulfport; P. N.
Howell, Howison; Col. R. P. Linfield,
Gulfport.
Stone County—J. A. Simpson,
Stillmore; S. S. Mincy, S. J. Hinton,
Jas. L. Sells, Wiggins; Claud Bennett,
Perkinston.
Jackson County—C. H. Woods, G.
M. O’Neill, Moss Point.
Hancock County—A. S. Weston,
Logtown.
Professional Cards
DR. C. L. HORTON,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
OFFICE:
GEX BLDG., Main Street
HOURS:
10 to 11 A. M. and 4 to 5 P. M.
TELEPHONE 83
Residence —Carroll Avenue. Res. Phone S2.
DR. J. A. EVANS, .
DENTIST
HOURS;
From 8 A. M. to 5:30 P. M.
OFFICE;
Hancock County Bank Bldg.
HAY ST. LOUIS, MISS.
EMILE J. GEX,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
OFFICE:
GEX BLDG. Main Street
fIAY ST. LOUIS, MIS§,
ROBERT L. GENIN,
OFFICE I
GENIN BLDG., Main Street
BAY ST. LOUIS, MISS.
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR
AT LAW
GEX & WALLER
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
Will practice in at civil matters in
all State Courts and in all matters
in the General Courts of Missis*
sippi.
There is more Catarrh In this section
of the country than all other diseases
put together, and for years it was sup
posed to be incurable. Doctors prescribed
local remedies, and by constantly failing
to cure with local treatment, pronounced
it incurable. Catarrh is a local disease,
greatly Influenced by constitutional con
ditions and therefore requires constiivi
tional treatment. Hall's Catarrh Medi
cine. manufactured by F. J. Cheney &
Cos.. Toledo, Ohio, is a constitutional
remedy. Is taken internally and acts
thru the Blood on the Mucous Surfaces
of the System. One Hundred Dollars re
ward is offered for any case that Hall’s
Catarrh Medicine fails to cure. Send for
circulars and testimonials.
F. J. CHENEY & CO., Toledo, Ohio.
Sold by Druggists, 75c.
BaU’i Family £UU Cor conitipattom
The death of Joseph P. Scafide on
Monday, Ortober 7, 1918, removes
from Bay St. Louis one of its splen
did and most estimable young men.
He died from pneumonia at A. & M.
College, where he entered the stu
dents’ training class. Although an
employe of the government, he could
have claimed deferred classification,
but he was patriotic and loved his
country for its sake and for the safe
ty of his home, and was among the
| first to leave when the draft limit
i was changed. The remains were con
veyed to Bay St. Louis and the fun
eral took place from the late resi
dence on Friday, October 11, 1918;
interment at St. Mary’s cemetery.
Aged 21 years, he was the oldest
son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Scafide. a na
tive of this city; a graduate of St.
Stanislaus College. Up to a short
time ago he w r as employed as mail
clerk on the I. C. road between New
Orleans and Memphis, and was well
known and liked wherever he visited.
The death of this excellent young
man is generally deplored, and the
bereaved family has the heartfelt
sympathy of the community.
The recent death of Dr. E. W.
Manar, of this city, leaves a void
both in his private and professional
life that will be hard to fill- Asa
citizen he was one of the foremost;
ever ready to lend a hand and to ac
tively participate in whatever was
considered best for the public weal.
No man stood higher in the communi
ty,, and during his twelve years of
residence here he had endeared him
self to all who knew him by his every
act. He had expressed a wish to live
and die in Bay St. Louis , and, accord
ingly, his remains were laid “at
rest” in the hallowed precincts of
Cedar Rest cemetery. He is sur
vived bv his widow and two young
sons, who will return to Purvis, Miss.,
where Mrs. Manar’s mother resides.
Dr.Manar wall be missed and genuine
ly regretted. His charitable minis
trations knew no bounds. His time
was never his own. It might be
said he lived and died for others.
The Echo deeply sympathizes with
Mrs. L. D. Fahey and family in the
death of son and brother. Alphonse
Fahey, aged 21 years, had gone to A.
& M. College receently to enter mili
tary training class. The young man
contracted influenza and pneumonia
followed. He died Saturday, Octo
ber 12th, the remains reaching here
Monday night, 14th, aqd interment
was had the next day at St. Mary s
Cemetery. Mrs. Fahey and sons,
Messrs. Edmund and Leo, were at
the college when the end came. This
writer kpew Alphonse Fahey since he
was a child, and it was with interest
we saw him grow and enter into
man’s estate. Gentlemanly, he was
the possessor of many sterling quali
ties and his death removes from our
community one wh G gave so much
promise for the immediate future.
But his memory will live and those
who know him cannot forget the ex
amplary home life of this young man
who practiced the Christian virtues
which now bless his soul.
Allen B, BushneJl.
Allen B. Bushnell, a successful and
well-known young farmer and dairy
man, residing in the rear of Wave
land, died at the family home on the
15th of the present month. Death
was caused from influenza and pneu
monia. He was a native of Minneso
ta, aged 34 years, and is survived hy
his wife and four small children, and
his parents, his father pastor of the
Congregational church at St. Jos
eph, Michigan, and who, with his
wife, reached here before their son
died. ,
Mr. Bushnell, - T r., was a graduate
of the University of Illinois. He was
not only an unusually intelligent
young man, but w r as energetic and
ambitious, and had made quite a suc
cess of his venture when he was taken
away.
The bereaved family have our sin
cere sympathy in their severe loss.
SPECIAL MEETING OF BOARD
OF MAYOR AND ALDERMEN.
STATE OF MISSISSIPPI,
HANCOCK COUNTY,
City of Bay St. Louis.
Pursuant to a special call, a spe
cial meeting of the Board of Mayor
and Aldermen of the City of Bay St.
Louis was held at the City Hall on
Saturday, the 19th day of October,
A. D. 1918.
There were present—R. W. Webb,
mayor; W. H. Starr, Louis Schwall,
aldermen; Sylvan J. Ladner, secreta
ry. Absent—L. C. Carver, R. S.
Blaize, aldermen, aldermen* Albert
Jones, marshal.
CALL FOR SPECIAL MEETING OF
BOARD OF MAYOR AND AL
DERMEN.
State of Mississippi,
County of Hancock.
T 0 W. H, Starr, R. S. Blaize, Louis
Schwall and L. C. Carver, aldermen
of the City of Bay St. Louis, Miss.
You are notified that at a special
meeting of the Board of Mayor and
Aldermen, of the City of Bay St.
Louis, is called to meet at the City
Hall, in said city, on the 19th day
of October, at 7 o’clock P. M., 1918,
the object of s|*ia meeting is as fol
lows. to pay off labor and employes
and payment of street commissioner.
R. W, WEBB, Mayor.
The City Marshal will execute and
return the above notice instanter.
R. W. WEBB, Mayor.
Attest: Sylvan J. Ladner, Clerk.
Received the above call at 8 o’clk
on this the 19th day of October, 1918.
B. J. LADNER, Deputy Marshal.
We, the undersigned aldermen of
the City of Bay St. Louis, hereby ac
knowledge service of the above call
upon qs personally at least three
hours before the time of meeting and
waive copy of call.
W. H. Starr—9:3o o’clock A. M.
L. C. Carver—3 o’clock P. M.
Louis Schwall —5 o’clock P. M.
I have served notice on the above
aldermen at leasWthre e hours before
the time of meenng.
B. J. LADNER, Deputy Marshal.
The following bills were allowed,
approved and ordered paid out of the
l •• V 1 ■
[I The Owners rot I j
I “Swift & Company” \!
IN (Now Over 22,000) I
| Perhaps it has not occurredvto j|
I you that you can participate tin .1
|i Swift & Company’s profits,—and v |
I also share its risks, —by becom- i
ing a co-partner in the business? \ II
I It is not a close corporation. I \|| |
You can do this by buying Swift £ * |||
Company shares, which are *ibougbt \|| |
and sold on the Chicago and y
stock exchanges. \ || I
I There are now over 22,0004 shar
e holders of Swift & Company, 31500 of
whom are employes of the Company^
These 22,000 shareholders /rindude \ \ii|
j| 7,800 women. ®||
Cash dividends have \ B I
ularly for thirty years. The*rate at .ill
present is 8 per cent. y •II
The capital stock is -all of one kind, W
namely, common stock—tHfere is no I
preferred stock, and this commofLStock Ik >!
represents actual values. There ,is no ||k s
“water,” nor have good will, trade ||l| v
marks, or patents been 'Capitalized. |i|m
This statement is made solely foryour v |H|
information and not for ; the*purpose of
booming Swifts Company slock. |
We welcome, however, ■ live stock;
producers, retailers, and consumers as || I
|jj co-partners. \ ... BI
We particularly like >to have for *
shareholders the people with whom
; we do business. 9 || |
15 This leads to / a better 111 I
understanding./ T 1 I
I Year Book of interesting and I
instructive facts sent on request. . I |Li
I Address Swift & Company, - %;■ IMI
Union Stock Yards, Chicago, Illinois \ * 'i |I II
_ { |H
I Swift & Company |
| yr President |
SC. Si. cvc J\L o ’i zScwi,
DRUGS, CHEMICALS, MEDICINES, \
FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, PERFUMERY^
FINE STATIONERY, FISHING TACKLE, ETC.
- ♦♦♦♦
.
Physicians’ Prescriptions Carefully Compounded.
The Finest Line of Cigars, Tobacco, Pipes and All Kinds of Smokers
{ Supplies in Bay St. Louis. .
„ IJ •
%&t V
SOLE AGENTS FOR VINOL. BAY ST. LOUIS, MISS. 9
following fund:
CITY FUND.
Ed. Becker, labor, 7 days at
$2.00, _ 14.00
Joseph Marengo, labor, 5 days
at $2.00, 10.00
Amos Wright, 8 1-4 days at
$2.00, 16.50
Joe Capdepon, 9 1-4 days at
$2.00, 19.00
L. Bangard, street commis
sioner, salary for 15 days, 45.00
August Taconi, teamster 15
days salary, 32.50
Ernest Meyers Teamster, 15
days salary, 27.50
Cumberland Tel. Cos., street
commissioner’s telephone,- 6.85
$171.35
There being no further business ap
pearing, the Board adjourned to
meeting in course.
SYLVAN J. LADNER, Sec’y, '
THE ECHO’S
Job Printing Department
U Complete tad Lp-*e-Date
1 POWER EQUIPPED
mi i— mmm*
TWEV f-SEVENTH YEAR.—NO. 42.
CIUNCKKY SI MMONS.
THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI.
To Catherine Shannon —You are com
manded to appear liefore the Chancery
Court of the Comity of Hancock County,
in Raid State, on the first Monday of Oct
ober, A. D. 3918, to defend the suit In said
Court of.James S. Shannon, for divorce,
wherein you are a defendant.
This 24th day of September, A, D. 1918,
SEAL. A. A. KERGOSIEN, Clerk.
CASTOR IA
For Infant* and Children
In Use For Over 30 Years
Signature
■' - - -

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