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The sea coast echo. [volume] (Bay Saint Louis, Miss.) 1892-current, April 23, 1921, Image 1

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86074033/1921-04-23/ed-1/seq-1/

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TOMORROW THE B4G DAY.
All eyes are turned to the one
great object of tomorrow, to raise
by subscription the sum of $30,000
for the Catholic Church Debt Fund
and Building Fund. The project is
•o large and the object so important
that it practically becomes a com
munity affair, regardless of what
may be said to the contrary.
Subscription, $2.00 Per Annum, Always in Advance.
Where Pure Drugs and Superior Services are Paramount.
Bay Drug
Company
(Successors to Power Drug Company)
" Beach and Main St. Bay St. Louis, Miss.
Our prescription department is in charge of Mr. S. E. Cowan,
graduate pharmacist of year* experience, whose knowledge and
ability is a guarantee.
Our stock of drugs is now and dependable. Make no mistake.
11 Have the Bay Drug Company fill your prescriptions. Efficiency and
dependability counts —prices so reasonable as to warrant your return.
Our Soda Fountain department—with VELVET ICE CREAM
0 caters to your patronage. A Fresh Stock of Choice Box Candies.
1.. . .
and
SOME FACTS ABOUT THE FORD
—THE UNIVERSAL CAR.
The Ford factory at Detroit has
given out authentic figures that are
interesting, to say the least. They
show how many Ford cars and trucks
have been built each month since
January Ist of the present year, and
how many have been sold to retail
customers, in the United States.
The Echo herewith presents the fig
ures:
Produced
JANUARY 29,883
FEBRUARY 35,305
MARCH 61,866
Total Production 127,074
Delivered to
Retail Customers
57,208
63,603
87,221
Total Retail Sale* 208,032
showing that the actual sales for the
first three months of 1921 exceeded
production by 80,958 Ford cars and
trucks!
April requisitions already specifiy
107,719 additional cars and trucks,
and the estimated April output of
the factory and assembly plants com
bined calls for only 90,000!
These facts clearly show that the
demand for Ford products is grow
ing much faster than manufacturing
facilities to produce and were it not
for the dealers’ limited stocks, which
ar e now being rapidly depleted, many
more customers would have been
compelled to wait tor their cars. It
will only be a matter of weeks, there
fore, until a big surplus of orders
will prevent anything like prompt de.
liveries.
If you would be sure of having
your Ford car or truck when you
want it, you should place your order
now. Don’t delay. Phone or drop
a card to the local selling agents,
Edwards Bros., Bay St. Louis.
—FOR SALE: One Red Star wick
less oil stove; three burner; practic
ally new; apply P. O. Box 11, Fen
ton, Miss.
sJZothl' .
HI ' THE ’JK?VSS.M CAR I
|m $440 f. o. b. Detroit S j
111 With Spring Comes the Rush Season for Ford Cars. I
111 EACH YEAR THOUSANDS HAVE BEEN COMPELLED TO , j
1 I II mix FOR THEIR CARS AFTER PLACING THEIR ORDERS. SOME- I
I; I TIMES THEY HAVE WAITED MANY MONTHS. I
|l | BY PLACING YOUR ORDER NOW. YOU WILL BE PROTECT- I
! | ING YOURSELF AGAINST DELAY. YOU WILL BE ABLE TO GET I
I I REASONABLY PROMPT DELIVERY ON YOUR FORD CAR. AND I
iilil YOU WILL HAVE IT TO ENJOY WHEN YOU WANT IT MOST- j
I | | THIS SPRING. ■ * I
I | DON’T PUT OFF PLACING YOUR ORDER. I
I | EDWARDS BROTHERS I
|{| AUTHORIZED DEALERS I
Ij i BAY ST. LOUIS. MISSISSIPPI. I
f
'' * —.—
CAMPGROUND SCHOOL
MAKES FINE REPORT.
Seashore Institution to Get Improve
ments Through Methodist Fund.
BILOXI, April 17.—At the an
nual meeting of the board of trus
tees for the Seashore Campground,
with members present from three
conferences of Mississippi, Alabama
and Louisiana, held in the Seashore
Campground this week, the Rev. H.
W. Van Hook was re-elected presi
dent of the Seashore Campground
School for another year. Reports
of this institution as handed in by
Mr. Van Hook were the most encour
aging since its establishment in Bi
loxi. There is being planned to
spend approximately $106,000 upon
the building sometime in the near
future, these funds to be procured
from the $33,000,000 to be raised
in a campaign in Southern Metho
dism. Plans were also discussed
for the coming season of the Sea
shore Divinity School to be held in
the tabernacle of the grounds dur
ing June and July at which time
there will be present students from
the three states together with a cap
able corps of instructors and lec
turers. Those present at the meet
ing were: Sam Meyers, New Or
leans, president; Rev| H. M. Ellis,
Brookhaven, J. R. Abels, Ponchatou
la, La.; J. McDonald, New Orleans;
H. B. Rush and Dr. W. T. Bolton,
Biloxi; S. A. Tomlinson, Gulfport;
S. J. Otis, Logtown and M. Reach,
Mobile.
—A very pretty christening cere
mony occurred at the church of Our
Lady of the Gulf Sunday afternoon,
when the infant son of Dr. and Mrs.
A. P. Smith was christened into the
faith. The sponsors were Mr. and
Mrs. Jos. Killeen of New Orleans and
Bay St. Louis. Rev. Father Gmelch
performed the ceremony.
KEY SHELL FOR SALE.
Boat load delivered on the beach
at Bay St. Louis at 35c per barrel.
Any quantity. Supplied by
THORNTON ELECTRICAL STORE
apr!6-2t Pas s Christian, Miss.
BAY ST. LOUIS, MISSISSIPPI. SATURDAY. APRIL 23rd, 1921.
HARRISON SCORES COL. HAR
VEY; UNFIT FOR POST, HE SAYS.
Mississippi Senator Charges Intoler
ance in Fiery Attack on Ambas
sador.—Asserts Appoint
ment Was Direct Strike
at Wilson Policy.
WASHINGTON, April 21.—Sena
tor Pat Harrison, of Mississippi, head
of the speakers’ bureau in the recent
Democratic campaign, told his col
leagues in the Senate today what he
thought of the appointment of Col
onel Harvey as ambassador to Great
Britain. He didn’t mince any words.
His speech was one of the most fiery
denunciations that have been heard
in the Senate chamber in many
months.
“There never was such an intoler
ant and unfit individual in all the
history of mankind, by training, tem
perament and environment, to take
up the important duties of our re
presentative at the Court of St.
James as Colonel Harvey,” was the
judgment that Senator Harrison
passed on President Harding appoin
tee.
Colonel Harvey’s critic declared
that there was no official position
within the gift of the United States,
under the Secretary of State, which
had greater international significance
than the post of Ambassador to
Great Britain. He ran over the list
of the great men of past days who
have held this post, from James Mon.
roe and John Quincey Adams down
through John Hay and Joseph H.
Choate to Walter H. Page and John
H. Davis. He recalled how r Mr. Wil
son repudiated Colonel Harvey In
1912, because he was, an “errand
boy for Wall Street and the tool of
special interests.”
“I shall not in this discussion ques
tion the journalistic ability of Col
onel Harvey, a ready talker and a
fluent writer, whose words and ex
pressions are at times as violent as
the raging dust of a tornado or the
angry waves of a storm-swept sea,”
said Senator Harrison. “Educational
qualifications and strong intellectual
attainments are attribues that might
qualify one for service in one field
of labor, but when other attributes
they may destroy this effectiveness
in other fields.
“Few men in the history of jour
nalism have possessed to a mo-re re
markable degree qualities of genius
for violent expression, caustic criti
cism, and the power through fair or
foul means to employ cogent phrases
intended to appeal to prejudice and
to arouss hatred and resentment. He
is a remarkable man in that his
whole life has been one of inconsis
tency and vacillation. —New Orleans
Times-Picayune.
NOTICE TO CHEMICAL DEALERS
Notice is hereby given that the
Clerk of the Board of Supervisors,
of Hancock County, Miss., will re
ceive bids for 800 gallons of Kil-tik-
D or some approved dip recognized
by the United States Government.
Monday, May 2nd, 1921.
The Board reserves the right to re l
ject any and all bids.
This the 9th day of April, 1921.
A. A. KERGOSIEN,
apr9-4t. Clerk.
CHANCERY COURT SUMMONS.
(No. 2455.)
The State of Mississippi.
To Ethel W. Dean;
You are commanded to appear be.
fore the Chancery Court of Hancock,
in said State, on the 4th Monday of
May, A, D., 1921, to defend the suit
in said Court of Henry P. Dean,
wherein you are a defendant.
This 22nd day of April,* A. D.,
1921. A. A. KERGOSIEN,
apr23-4t. Clerk.
BIG DRIVE IS ON FOR SUNDAY.
Drive for Thirty Thousand Dollars
for Catholi Church Fund Will
Be Staged Tomorrow. —
Results Seemingly
Assured.
The story of a project for a drive
of thirty tiioU sand dollars for the
Catholic church, to be staged tomor
row, and as published in the columns
of The Echo last Saturday afternoon
was enthusiastically received by the
public. The plan is unanimously ap
proved b.> all Catholics and it is ap
parent that not onjy will the church
debt of SII,OOO be wiped away but
sufficient amount of cash be realized
to finish the sacred edifice.
At a meeting of the executive com
mittee with a number of the captains
of the different territories held Wed
nesday night, it was found the organ
ization for tomorrow’s work was
perfected and that the outlook was
indeed encouraging. There was not
a luke warm member present. Every
body is seemingly more than anxious
to do his or her share. And it is
this spirit that is going to make the
project one of success.
Asa feeler it was suggested that
at this meeting those present would
give their subscriptions for the five
year period and the., result was that
$7,000.00 was the total amount of
cash. Those present “talked big,”
since money talks. Subscription by
the $500.00 clip came in at a lively
rate. Thirty thousand dollars is a
big amount, and the people, in order
to raise it, must talk in the hundred
dollar terms. Fives and tens will
not make it.
Rev. Father A. J. Gmelch gives
out the following statement over his
signature, which speaks for itself, as
follows:
Church of Our Lady of the Gulf.
Bay St. Louis, Miss.
“W’hen we consider that all we
are, all we possess, all that is good
and great and noble emanates from
God, our Creator, supreme ' Master
and kind Father, we realize that
there is nothing too good, no- sacri
fices too great that we can bring in
return for the blessings bestowed on
us. The main channel through which
returns can be made to that omnipo
tent God is the practical zeal we
show for the beauty of His house,
our church, where we participate in
and enjoy the spiritual comforts of
our sublime faith.
“Think of what it means to have
our church beautiful within and
without and to know that we, you
and I, helped at a sacrifice to make
it so. Our Church is God’s house
in thif* parish. The beauty of His
house is a reflex of the beauty of
our character,
“You are now given an opportun
ity to share in making our church a
“HOUSE BEAUTirfIFL.” It is an
opportunity for you to do a duty
which you owe to God, to your chil
dren, to yourself and to your fellow
parishioners. This is not a matter
of charity and yet, by giving liber
ally, you give proof that you love
your God, because you show ZEAL
for the BEAUTY of His HOUSE.
And you can afford to give Much,
because the terms are easy. So
much a year in five installments.
Thus you can give $500.00 to the
chunh by'giving SIOO.OO a year for
five years. Kindly state what you
will give and sign accordingly the
pledges and notes which the Captain
of your section will present to you
on SUNDAY, APRIL 24th.
“The first note will be due within
one month after date.
“Be BIG in giving.
“Thirty thousand dollars is a big
sum. To give you an idea of the ne.
cessity of giving BIG amounts, just
consider that it takes TWELVE
HUNDRED TIMES, $25.00 or SIX
HUNDRED TIMES, $50.00, or
THREE HUNDRED TIMES, SIOO.OO
or ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY
fTMES, $250.00, or SIXTY TIMES,
$500.00. to make up the sum of
$30,000.00.
BOYS and GIRLS are pledging
TWENTY FIVE DOLLARS or FIVE
DOLLARS a year. You surely can
give MORE.
“It takes at least $30,000.00 to
pay off the debt and to finish our
Church. $30,000.00 is a BIG sum
to raise. BUT WE CAN RAISE IT.
“The GOOD which will flow from
it, the SATISFACTION which we
will derive, is FULLY WORTH our
GREATEST effort.
“I am counting on YOU to go
OVER THE TOP.
“I myself am giving BIG in this
drive and I look for YOU to do the
same.
“With best wishes.
“Your pastor,
A. J. GMELCH.”
INCOME TAX LAW IS HELD CON
STITUTIONAL.
Test Case is Made With Regard to
Individuals and Corporations
The income tax law of Mississippi
was held constitutional Monday by
the State Supreme Court. The
opinion was rendered by Chief Jus
tice Sydney Smith in the test cases
of the Hattiesburg Grocery Cos., vs
Stokes V. Robertson, ivvfnue agent,
with regard to corporations and Jno.
T. Connor, of Hattiesburg, with re
gard to individuals.
The income tax law which was
held not to be in conflict with the
Federal Constitution, was passed in
1912 and comprised Chapter'l2o of
Hemingway’s code. The statute
fix; s a tax of 5 mills on the dollar on
all incomes above 42500. There is
no penalty for the failure to pay in
years past.
The only method provided by the
statute or ascertaining a person’s in
come is for a return thereof to be
made to the state auditor under oath
by the person himself either volun
tarily or under compulsion, and it is
on this return alone that the amount
ca tax due on his income by the per
son who made the return is to be
computed.
PISTACHE WRITES AMI COCO
ABOUT TOMORROW’S DRIVE.
Cher Ami Coco:
Abien, how yo pass, ma, fren,
since dem balls? Doggon, we have
good time, hein? I bet yo leg dey
all git steef an yo coon hit roun nex
days, hein? I no me caas I’m get
tin long ole like yo, an dat all nite
beezness play le.diable w T id us fellas
wat ain no jellies been, hein? Som
peep dey use fo all dat, yo take dat
Rafe fellas, heem shees kin make de
revicie all rite her an den look fo
mo, yas.
Coco, yo talk nout look fo mo,
abien, us fellas we goin look fo mo
rite now, yo got fo.no dat we goin
do one gran beezness us apresans fo
dat Catlik churches wat we got ici,
wat name Our Lady of de Gulfs. Yo
no dat som year pass we have beau
coup fire ici an we hav de unfor
tunes of burn down our churches
long side odder places like dem Cou
vents an nodder house an we start
bild up up all we kin fo long dat we
got monies, hein, mai soon we doan
got no mo monies all hav fo stop
build, annyhow we start one church
es wat goin be some pride fo la belle
Baie St. Louie, an mo pride fo la
Grace de Died, an dats goin be one
fine places fo God stay in, hein? Yo
no dem mo fine we make de houses
wat God Heem Hees got fo stay, de
mo good we goin feel by ourself
hein?
Abien, Coco, dat bom Pret Harder
Melsh, heem has git one hidears an
hees call all de big fellas up dat
Casey Halls an hees hav talk wid
dem bout wat dey goin do fo le
Glorys de Dieu, an dem salvations of
dem churches (No, Coco, doan fool
yoself, dey doan calls yo fren Jac
ques, I’m no big fellas, me.) Anny
how, le bon pret heem hees git dem
fellas in dem Caseys Halls an dey all
put dey bed togedder an com wid
one conclusions dat dey goin toot de
horn an wake up all dem Catliks wat
dey got in dis mans shees towns
her.
Uey all say shees kin be do an
everybcdys swear hees goin make
pride wad *heessef on one beaucoup
big drive fo monies fo pay off shees
dets an feeneesh bild shees churches
wat goin be de mo gran wat yo kin
see on dem coas o anrty odder coas;
me I’m goin tell yo how dats go-in be
do, Coco. Yo sees deys got beau
coup Catliks in dis towns, hein, an
if everybods dey put dey shoulders
fo de wheels ad push hard, dem
“fcapitaine de le Drives say dey no
dat in five year dey goin have nutf
monies fo all dey want fo make one
good jobs on dat churches. Dat
meen, Coco, dey goin feex tings so
dat kin make de sobscribe fo so
mocn evei’y years fo five year, so
dat doan gc-in be hard fo yo, hein?
Yo see dat give yo beaucoup time fo
make de revicie an yo doan goin
feel dem strains; yo see one fellas
heem shees kin make sine de pep fo
to hundrud dollar, hein, an dat only
goin be bout forty dollar every
years, o- tree dollar an tobits fo one
monts, yo see dats not goin be hard,
hein?
Coco, de mo bes ways fo fellas do
dat das fo start wat dey calls one
Savin count (I bleev dats Creesmees
Save, hein?) and when de banks
dey pay yo dat monies yo goin fine
dat yo -got some lef fo yo sef, fo
spen Creesmees wid, an le Bon Dieu
Heem Hees goin bless yo fo wat yo
do on feex up Shees houses, yas.
Yo no, Coco, one fellas never lose
wat hees giv God, non, yo kin see dat
wat le Bon Dieu say heesser in de
Bibe bout yo git mo intrus on dat
monies den yo tink bout.
So, Coco, we goin start nex Son
day fo dat an we goin have de mo
big drive wat yo never see, an we
goin sho de peep dat de Catliks de
Baie St. Louie got de rite kine
speereet in dem, an take one big in
trus in dey churches; an Coco, wen
dats feeneesh up we sho goin make
pride wid dat work, us, yas, an yo
got fo com an see dem big celebra
tions wat we goin have, us, an see at
de same time de mo gran maison de
Dieu wat yo want see, yas, an yo got
fo breeng Teeteens an Coocoone an
Leeza long wid yo let lone all dem
nodder peep wat stay in Bayou Co
codri.
Coco, yo no dat de Maje Generals
on dat drive goin be Holy Joe? Yas,
dats wat Keekeen tell me; I beleev
Keekeon heem shees going be Aide
de Camps, me I’m goin be private in
date Mane strit brigades an I unstan
I’m goin have be guide my dem
strs, so if I lose ma way yo will no
dats fo de reezon dat I din have one
compass me, annyhow w e goin drive
fass like we kin an we ain goin pay
no nevermine by dem sine wats on
de poses bout 1 5 mile hour, an Coco,
dats one time we goin laff rite in
M’sieu Albere Jone heem shees face,
yas!
Coco, if yo see anny dem fellas
wat make liv in dis Parois, yo tell
dem not fo wait till somboddy run
Jem down, mai, jas com across an do
wat dey kin in dis drive by tell how
moch dey goin give fo de feenees
dem churches—now yo make de re
memhre dat dey doan have fo give
:: 11 by one time, yo no, dey sine up
f five so mo-h every years, like dey
wuz goin fo give, les say 200 dollar,
■abien, dey have fo give forty dollar
each years, yo see, an if dey want
giv. 100 dollar, abien dat make j..s
20 dollar years, hein, annyhow yo
com down an se wat yo kin do, hein?
Abien, w~id big hope dat we goin
make de revicie an goin git mo den
nuff fo wat we want, I’m goin stop
rite yo.
Yo mo bes Fren,
JACQUES PISTACHE.
—W. A. McDonald, president of
■he Bandaret Oil Company, left dur
ing the early part of the week for
Wharton County, Texas, where drill
ing operations are active. Late re
ports are to the effect a depth of
over 1100 feet has been reached and
the log of the well compares with
those of other wells that have proven
productive gushers. It is evident
the Bandaret Oil Company is going
to be successful, for every indication
so far confirms this belief.
• ♦ I'> !'♦♦♦♦♦*♦< 111 I 1 1111 !■ !>MI !' I 'IHI 1I I 'H't 1111 I I >***| |
II Baurnrk H attb II
BAY ST. LOUIS, - ' - MISSISSIPPI.
;; RESOURCES OVER ONE MILLION DOLLARS. \\
;; NO ACCOUNT TOO SMALL TO SERVE. ! I
~ The constructive minds and the toiling hands of years
11 have built up step by step the structure that supplies us < ►
as
.. with service to-day.
", The modern service organism is merely an assembly of >
a a
* the achievements of years>
11 And where Hancock County Bank service is rendered. •
as
• • recognition of this fact has become crystallised into a policy
• • of constant striving to increase the already established ef- <•
II * 9
• • ficiency of the service that is known every where the name < *
a a
• > of this institution is mentioned.
.. We know, and thousands of our customers do too, that we • >
• • hav e “no account too small to serve." * ’
• > And that the small depositors business is attended to with ' ’
• * as much efficiency and sincerity as the largest ones are.
a > ’
• * For nearly a quarter of a century this bank has grown
I | '
• * and prospered and continues to do so by the confidence of ►
• * a great community. J J
4 Per Cent Paid on Savings and Time Deposits
ifatmirk (Eomttg Sank.
BILOXI NEWS NOTES OF WEEK.
Interesting Batch of Chronicles from
Sea Coast Metropolis.
Biloxi Mayor Appoints Delegates.
For the purpose of having them at
tend the annua! convention of the
Mississippi Valley Association to be
held in Neve Orleans, May 2,3 and 4,
Mayor Kennedy has named the fol
lowing delegates to represent Biloxi
J. W. Apperson, J. E. Breaux, Jr.,
W. H. Hunt, E. C. Tonsmire and
Douglas Watson.
Navy Men Transferred.
For the purpose of having them en
ter active service with the United
States Navy. Two hundred and for
ty sailors from the Gulfport Naval
Station have been transferred to
Hampton Roads, Va., leaving 225 at
the station. The retention of the
naval station at Gulfport has not as
yet, been decided by the secretary of
the navy.
Bohemians Return Home.
Bohemians brought to Biloxi from
Baltimore for work in the oyster
packing plants, numbering 125 peo
ple will leave Biloxi next week. The
small number brought here this sea
son was due to the heavy railroad
transportation charges.
Resort for People.
The naval reserve in the northwes
tern section of Biloxi Jias been put
into commission for use by coast
people during the summer under the
direction of the local commissioners.
There is also completed an 840 foot
wharf for fishing, boating and bath
ing privileges, together with other
amusements for picknickers and
others frequenting the place.
More Elks Received.
At a recent metting of the Biloxi
Lodge of Elks several new candid
ates were taken into the organiza
tion in compliance with a campaign
directed by Colonel John P. Sullivan
chairman for the grand lodge, in
which they expect to reach a total of
1,000,000 members throughout the
United States by July. The business
meeting was followed with an enter
tainment of unusual interest and a
banquet.
Biloxi Police Invited.
Mayor Kennedy, who presides over
the police force, has been requested
by R. E. Enright, police commission
er of New York, to send delegates
to the metropolis May 3 to 7, to be
present at a conference to be held
by police officials from all parts of
the country.
Yacht Clubs to Meet.
Officials of the Yacht Club have
been invited by W. H. Parham, sec
retary of the Southern Yacht Club,
New Orleans, to participate in their
annual regatta to be held in that
city May 7th. They are also asked
to send delegates to a meeting of the
Gulf Yachting Association which is
being contemplated holding May 8.
ii 4 0. ii
:: : “ . "" '"~ jj
HARDWARE: DRY GOODS:
;: implements, a clean line of
UTENSILS, CAREFULLY SE
CUTLERY, LECTED FABRICS,
ii tools, conservatively •>
l * *
c T OVi0Vi , BOUGHT, CON
SCIENTIOUSLY
RANGES, PRICED FOR YOUR ii
ETC., ETC. DELECTATION.
:: ■
I JOSEPH 0. MAM, FRONT STREET |
IT WILL IDENTIFY YOU.
Bay St. Louis never failed in any
drive of the many during the war,
whether it was Liberty Bonds, Red
Cross, Savings Stamps, Etc. This
was in time of war. la time of
pnoce we will not fail tomorrow in
our drive for $30,000 to pay for and
finish the House of the Prince of
Peace. Your contribution will iden
tify you. ■
THIRTIETH YEAR.—No. 17.
MISSISSIPPI’S DENTISTS.
The Mississippi Dental Association
is holding Its annual session in this
city, having convened Monday, and
is attended by as fine and intelligent
looking body o-f men as ever assem
bled in the state capitol.
The science of dentistry, while not
near so old as that of medicine, is its
most useful associate, and is becom
ing every day closer and closer link
ed with the art of healing. Many of
the ills that human flesh is heir to
has been traced to the teeth, and
nowadays medical practitioners when
asked for advice, refer you to your
dentist with good results.
Some years ago, the Mississippi
legislature, recognized the great im
portance of dentistry as a curative
agent, authorized the formation of a
board of dental examiners and threw
other safeguard about the practice
of this most important profession of
dentistry in Mississippi stands sec
ond to no state in the Union, as will
be amply attested by attendance
upon one of its clinics and witnessing
the splendid work done.
The dentist of Mississippi are a
credit to their profession, an honor
to Mississippi and savior of the
toothache afflicted, and as such the
Clarion-Ledger welcomes them to
Jackson with the hope that they may
have sufficient “pull” with the citi
zens of Jackson to make their stay
a pleasant one.—Jackson Clarion-
Ledger.
PROPERTY IN TATE COUNTY
DROPS OFF IN ASSESSMENT
SENATOBIA, April 14.—Accord
ing to the statement of Assessor
Fred T. Massey, Tate County prop
erty values are given in by the tax
payers at the lowest figures for sev
eral years, and as a result, the tax
rolls bid fair to be about one-half of
the amount last year. Lands are be
ing assessed at less than half the
amount of two years ago. The stock
of merchants also will be listed at
considerably less than last year.
This shortage in values, it is said, will
make it hard for the board of super
visors to realize enough taxes to
meet the bonded indebtedness and
current expenses.
Heretofore the State Tax Commis
sion has held values up to legal re
quirements, that is the market value
of the property, or its actual worth;
but since the market value has slum
ped to one-half or less, it appears the
commission will be robbed of its
teeth in the matter of ordering the
values raised.
Already the number of mills on
assessed value of the property has
reached the maximum fixed by the
law and it seems certain taxes for
this year are going to be much less
regardless of the taxing boards of
the county or the state.

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