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The Semi-weekly leader. (Brookhaven, Miss.) 1905-1941, April 12, 1922, Image 1

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86074065/1922-04-12/ed-1/seq-1/

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mum are cehtaw to com; ‘HPl? TMHI ffm you bleu the leak® to keep
FROM LEADER ADVERTISEMENTS £ JHljCa 'IKK. UF WITH ALL THE LOcT^
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THIRTY-SEVENTH YEAR OF PUBLICATION. - ✓ BROOKHAVEN, MISSIS8IPPL WEDNESDAY, APRIL 12, 1922 * — SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $2.50 BY THE YEAR.
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. - _: .L-i-tginj—
Ladies' New Easter Bonnets |
_...AT-_
| McGRATH’S
. . >
JUST ARRIVED FROM NEW YORK — 500 NEW BRIGHT HATS —
THE VERY LATEST STYLES AND COLORS FOR EASTER.

PRICED VERY SPECIAL AT..$6.00, $8.00 AND $10.00 ..
FANCY LEGHORNS GEORGETTE MILAN
HAIR BRAID AND MOIRE , -
ALL NEW TRIMMINGS, SHAPES AND SHADES


Dainty New Frocks—
We have some beautiful new Models just in—Figured Crepe de Chine,
Plain and Brocaded Roshanara Crepe, Combination Crepe and Sport Silks.
Showing in white and all the new bright colors.
* ' - *
LET US PLAN YOUR EASTER OUTFIT. WE CAN SURELY DRESS
YOU TO THE BEST ADVANTAGE. \
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McGRATH’S-StyleLeaders f
g L-11 . ■ ■ ■ ,j.! ' ■ ■ ) . * 1
/
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SINGE we have had the agency for
l Whitman’s Chocolates, the sales have
been steadily increasing and we have been
making new friends almost every day.
Our customers appreciate our efforts to se
lect quality products.
Hoffman’s
^IINIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHllllllllillllllllllU
| WEDDING GIFTS IN I
| ABUNDANCE [
I have lftore of the pieces that match those
already selected. .ROSE BOWLS, ORANGE
BOWLS, CASSEROLES and SANDWICH
TRAYS.
HAND PAINTED CHINA IN MANY BEAU
TIFUL DESIGNS. MAKE YOUR SELEC
TION FROM MY LARGE STOCK. SUIT
ABLE PRICES FOR EVERY ONE.
I THE LEADING JEWELER S
CHAS. D. SMITH.
IlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllM
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I McGRATH’S SHOE SECTION |
“How do my shoes look 1
from where you are?" |
-—You seldom if ever see your shoes as-— Ej
others see them. g
—Shoes that look good do not always |=i
feel good; shoes that feel good do - El
not always look good. " fin
—But if you go to a Walk-Over Shoe |g)
Store, where they'know the style
and shape that are made for your
feet, your shoes will look good and GO
feel good and be good. la
—Your style and shape are here in the
new patterns. 0
I Walk-Over |
§ McGRATH’S--—Style Leaders 1
..rrrrfflraHi
5i The League of Women Voters.
The League of Women Voters met
at the City Hall last Thursday with
Mrs. Brady chairman, presiding, and
Mrs. C. V. Clark as secretary.
Dr. Helen Gage of the Child Wel
fare Department of the State Board
of Health was the principal speakerv
Dr. Gage is director of educational
hygiene in Mississippi, and chairman
of a committee to devise a system of
sex instruction suitable for use in
public schools. She quoted Huxley’s
remark that if the race were judged
by text books on physiology It would
be presumed to be sexless. Sex in
struction should be given in the
home by parents in response to a
child's questions. If his questions
are not answered he will learn in un
desirable ways from companions. It
was Dr. Gage’s opinion that instruc
tion could better be given In connec
tion with subjects already in many
High School courses, such as biology,
physiology, general science, home
economics and mothercraft, than as
a separate course. To give boys and
girls the right standards of conduct
and wholesome attitude of mind was
J more important than studies, of ven
ereal diseases. The speaker will rec
— ommend that in colleges and normal
u schools of the state such courses will
be given as will enable the coming
teachers of the state to present the
subject properly.
Mrs. Brady reported upon state
affairs, and stated that Miss Black
of Hattiesburg will represent this
district, as well as her own, at the
convention of the League of 'Women
Voters in Baltimore.
Mrs. Hollands made a report of na
tional events. §he said that in 95
Connecticut towns women had been
elected board members or office hold
ers. A move by thirty-two Los An
geles picture houses to suppress the
showing of Jims whose chief inter
est at present was due to the notor
5 iety of the stars was commended.
E Discussion of Brookhaven’s lack of
E toilets for the travelling public, and
E of the care of the one at the station;
5 the (own ditch, mosquitoes and ant
E eradication were participated in by
s a number.
~F-* * *
The bright sunshine and clear sky
E of yesterday morning was especially
E appreciated after the heavy dovm
j: pour of the night before.
Ku Klux Klan Makes $ 1 000
Gift to Hospital Nurses’ Home
Robed Figures Startle Board Conference at
City Hall Last Night—First Appear
ance Here of Clansmen. *
"Has Brookhaven a Ku Klux
Klan?”
This question has been asked over
and over again the past few months
and was answered last evening by a
sudden and striking demonstration
of the Order at the City Hall in the
august, if confused, presence of the
Mayor and City Council and before
the gracious, if somewhat perturbed,
ladies of the King’s Daughters’ Hos
pital Board who were present in con
ference with the City Fathers re
garding the prospective Nurses’
Home.
It all happened in the twinkling
of an eye. The tall, white-robed,
fliasked figures—a half dozen of
them—strode into the Mayor’s office
and quietly presented to Mrs. H. V.
Wall, chairman of the Hospital
Board, a sealed envelope.
"Shall I open it?” the recipient
courteously inquired, although with
some agitation—“not knowing”. As
sent was signified; when lo! two
hundred five dollar hills, crisp and
clean, were revealed. Five hundred
dollars in each of two enclosures!
Before the ladies, or the gentle
men present, could catch their
breath, the representatives of the K.
K. K. had disappeared.
The hooded knights left behind
them not only the money, which is
explained in the appended letter, but
quite a large-sized spirit of excite
ment mingled with the gratification
at receiving anything from "the in
visible empire” that had revealed it
self so suddenly and effectively in
community service.
One thousand dollars all at once
would have been well nigh over
whelming from any source; and tips
the beam for the K. K. K. against all
givers.
Following is a verbatim copy of
the Klan message and of the note of
thanks written them in return by
the King’s Daughters;
Brookhaven, Miss., April 11, 1922.
To the King’s Daughters:—
Understanding that you need ex
actly $1,000.00 to complete your
nurses’ home fund we hand you here
with funds in that amount as our
donation.
As citizens of Brookhaven" and
Lincoln County and as God-fearing,
law-abiding, respectable Americans,
we ask that you be be assured that
we may be relied upon at all times to
support to the limit your splendid
organization, and any church that
teaches and tries to promite pure
Americanism and Christianity.
With sincerest bfest wishes, we
are most respectfully yours,
KNIGHTS of THE KU KLUX KLAN..
Following is the reply published
by the King’s Daughters, expressing
appreciation for the gift and the ex
pressed loyalty to the institutionj
To the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan
of Brookhaven and Lincoln County:
We wish to extend to you, our
good friends, our most sincere
thanks for your generous donation
of $1,000.00 to our Nurses’ Home
Funds. We appreciate your liberal
support of the cause, and- your as
surance, of fealty to us at all times
more than words can express.
Sincerely,
Ihe King’s Daughters and Sons.
Brookhaven, Miss., Apr. 12. 1922.
CAUSES MUCH EXCITEMENT.
On 'Brookhaven streets early this
morning and laTer in the day there
were groups here and there inside
and outside our business houses talk
ing over, more or less excitedly, the
unusual incident of the City Board’s
meeting, while some, somewhat wa
ry, thought it best to keep quiet—
"—who knows what they’ll do next?”
somebody said.
A member of the Council, who
wasn’t scared at all, bravely sug
gested out of meeting, that in case
of further testimony about certain
nocturnal disturbances in certain
quarters in our city, “the matter
would be referred to the Ku Klux
Klan”! '
Law-breakers are “keeping their
step” today while facing about and
expecting protection from the law
they have treated with contempt.
They should not be any more dis
turbed, however, than when Judge
Miller holds the mirror to their fa
ces at the opening of Circuit Court
and points the clear path of the law
abiding citizen. If the judges of our
courts should wear the cap and
gown of the K. K. K. they might a
chieve more with the mystery of it;
but underneath the regalia of all
high-toned, law-abiding citizens re
gardless of orders or organizations,
there is the heart of manhood that
beats true to honor and chivalry as
"when knighthood was in flower,"
and holds itself in readiness at all
times to exalt citizenship, protect the
weak and to relieve suffering human
ity. _ '
SWEET POTATOES..
ARE PROFITABLE
Hazlehurst Farmers Reap Rich
Returns from Experi
ment.
'Hazlehurst, Miss., April 7.—Farm
ers of the country through Demon
stration Agent C. E. McReynolds,
have made marked success of the
sweet potato business the pdSt year.
Most all farmers who had stored
their potatoes in the government
style storage plants have practically
disposed of their stocks, which
brought fancy returns.
During the past two months the
farmers have sold thousands of bush
els of their “sweets” at from $1.50
to $2.50 per bushel. The result is
that hundreds of other farmers will
add their names to the list of those
who will plant sweet potatoes for the
market.
The county farm agent hak been
instructing tjie planters on how to
plant, fertilize, and storeatheir crops
to await the better market condition
in the early spring. Many farmers
have fattened their hogs on the pota
toes and secured returns by that
method.
The ageift is now selling the farm
ers nitrate fertilizers at about 75 per
cent of the retail prices. ^ Hundreds
of planters will use more fertilizer as
they'are getting it cheaper and the
crops this year in corn, potatoes,
lespedeza and cotton will greatly
surpass last year’s crops. The Les
pedeza hay crop is to be the heaviest
in the history of the county and this
fall there will be much fat live stock
to market or kill for home consump
tion among the farmers. The farm
demonstration department has made
for the farmers the past twelve
months no less than $250,000 in ad
ded efficiency, saving on costs of fer
tilizers and marketing systems. The
agent draws only $2400 per year.
Shipment of vegetables has begun
to take on positive shape. Hazle
hurst has fully prepared to handle
its share of the county’s truck pro
duce this season. Shipping sheds
and over half mile of siding tracks
have been Installed for the use of
shippers by the railroad_company.
Hazlehurst will handle through its
dealers here a large part of the ship
ments from Eastern and Southern Co
piah.
Power Station a Cleanly Place.
„ A visiting electrician and' former
superintendent of* a power house in
another city visited the Brookhaven
municipal plant a few days ago, un
solicited, with a Brookhaven friend
and complimented it greatly on ac
count of its cleanly appearance and
the condition the machinery was
kept in, but aino agreed with those
who told him of the Inability of the
plant to carry the continuous over
load put upon it, when informed of
the demands made upon its capacity
and rated power. The plant has been
carrying on so far, although not able
to meet its full demands on account
of the cutting off of.the current from
some of its heaviest users when the
strain gets too heavy.
t , ■
- Advertisements are the most in
teresting sort of news. Read ours.
FIRST MAN HITS HOME
RUN IN OPENING GAME
Florida University Beats Mississippi
College—Score 2 to 0 — Big
Crowd Witnesses Event.
The opening baseball game of the
season took place here Monday with
Mississippi College and the Universi
ty of Florida -as.contestants, Florida
winning by a score of 2 to 0 before
a large audience of enthusiastic fans.
The game was won in the first in
ning when Baynes, first- man up for
the Florida aggregation, hit a homer
to left field. Edwards walked the next
batter. Then followed a sacrifice hit
and a two-bagger, netting another
marker for the Florida team and the
scoring was over for the day.
With the exception of the sixth
inning, with two out and a man on
second and third, the Florida team
was never in danger of being scored
on by the Mississippi aggregation. .
After his bad first Inning, Edwards
settled down and pitched an excellent
game. Flowers, on the hill for Flo
rida also pitched well, and both hur
lers received good support. Dickens,
catcher for Mississippi, was hit on
the head in -the seventh inning and
felled to the ground, the ball bounc
ing back as_if hit with a bat to
the shortstop's position, but he was
able to resume his position the fol
lowing inning.
Score:
University of Fla_200 000 000—2
Mississippi College.uO.OO 000 000—0
Batteries—Mississippi Col. — Ed
wards and Dickens; Florida U. —
Flowers and Ward. Errors—Miss.
3; Florida, 4. Hits—off Edwards, 5;
off Flowers 4: Struck out—by Ed
wards, 5; by Flowers, 6. Umpires—
Jones and Powell. •
Mr. T. C. Brlster, to whose ener
gy and enthusiasm credit must be
given for arranging the game, states
that the attendance was over 1100,
the gate receipts amounting to more
than $400. This augurs well for
the success of the sport here the com
ing season. Brookhaven was note£
last seasdn foe.the large attendance
at ball games, and this number out
to see two out-of-town teams clash
is ar promise of sustained* interest
when the home team takes-the field.
Base. Ball Team’s Manager
is Employed by Directors
Hamilton Fish, otherwise known
as “Ham" has been employed by the
directors of the Brookhaven Base
Ball Association as manager and will
report for duty here on May 1. Mr.
Fish was here for a couple of days
this week conferring with the direc
tors about his coming summer duties.
. Fish has been prominent in— the
South Atlantic League and is regard
ed as being a competent a man as
is possible to get here. His pl&ying
position on the team is first base and
his willow work average Is high.
■ ' i ^ i * ..... *
The National League of Women
Voters will hold convention at Bal
timore, April 20. Miss Kate B.
Brown, of Hattiesburg, Is the dele
gate from Mississippi. The Brook
haven League might have represen
tation; but being a part of the State
will be duly acknowledged by the
jady from Mississippi.
■ --—
Ant Campaign Continues. *
Yesterday ladies of Ward 1 gath
ered together a^ Che B. P. Canter
bury. home and concocted another
barrel of "ant medicine" which is
being distributed today.
Ward 2 is getting busy at Mrs.
Ed Penn's home and at Mrs. P. Z.
Jones’ for Ward 3.
It is hoped that every one who
paid her money will apply for what
is due her. The matter of making
the poison is no small underbaking,
and the ladies, Mrs. Brady, Miss An
nie Burns and Mrs. MfcCormick, who
undertook the leadership of the cause
that had long languished and who
have given very active service are
due praise'for relieving the situation
as it relates to ants and misunder
standing which sometimes stings
worse than the pestiferous insect'.
A financial report will be made at
the close of the demonstration.
^M
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LARGEST STOCK! LOWEST PRICE! BEST SELECTION!
ESTABLISHED OVER 50 YEARS
. A. 8TAFFLER
BROOXHAVEN, KISS.
CHINESE STERLING SILVER GOOD LUCK RINGS to bring
. the wearer good luck, health, happiness, prosperity, long life.
Everybody is buying them. Price $1.00 and 75c.
EASTER GIFTS—
La Tausca Pearls.
i
Complete line of Waterman’s Fountain Pens and Ever
sharp Pencils in plate silver and gold. Prices from $1 up.
Genuine Beautiful Line of Black Onyx Rings set with Diamonds
BROOKHAVEN’S BEST JEWELRY STORE
STEEPLER'S.
■■ - ■-. ' . - 1 V
pn|
M Bn
I 3 Days Only I
I Thursday - Friday-Saturday I
>- " » ^ IPlNi
I WE OFFER—
|||§|j • • * • • py
s 45c Gingham, special__— -.....10c
15c Brown Sheeting, special..._____10c
15c Percales and Prints, special .... 10c
Ladies fine Gingham Dresses, special for this sale only.95c
Ladies Fine Muslin Gowns, special....95c
IPepperell Sheeting, special ....49c
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//•■"■ ■ j—?■ .==■'■'" 1 11 v." . .. ? •■ 1 __
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Easter Footwear
% j
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No Matter what beautiful and well fitted Express shipments of the newest styles in
clothes you may wear, unless you Ladies Slippers are arriving daily,
have on a pair of stylish, well fitting that combine beauty and shoemaking
slippers, you are not dressed up. Any of the highest grade. You should not
gown in your wardrobe will appreciate pass up the opportunity of seeing
^ the brightening influence of our " these beautiful slippers and best of
nifty slippers. all at our remarkable low price.
These Tempting VALUES Will Certainly Bring You Here.
„ . * i
Grown QfHs’ Patent one and two strap
Sandals with flat rubber heels, sizes
2\j> to 8, actual value $5.50, our
price-$3.85
Ladies’ Dressy Patent Kid strap slip
pers with all patent, or Grey and
Nude quarters, sold at $10. Our
price -- $6.85
Ladies’ Black' or Brown Kid Oxfords,
military rubber heels at_t_$3.85
Ladies’ and Grown Girls Patent Ankle
strap or instep strap slippers with
flat or military heels, sizes 3 to 8,
values up to $5.00. Special at_$2.95
Ladies Black and Brown Satin Slip
pers with Baby or Full Louis Heels,
sizes 214 to 8, as good as any satins
sold at $9.00. Our price. _$4.95 and $5.85
Old Ladies Comfort Low Quarters
with flat heels, all sizes_$2.25
■ EXTRA SPECIAL— v |
g Men’s $30.00 Suits, guaranteed aU-wooL Just received. g
Men’s Tailor-Made Pants, $8.50 value. Special_$5.95
I Men’s $1.50 French Percale Shirts. Special__i_$1.00
Men’s $1.00 Union suits, full standard. Special___74c
White Plisse Crepe, 30c value. Special ^.1.19c
■ PRICES REDUCED ON SHOES, MILLINERY AND ALL PIECE GOODS. I
i
I DON’T FAIL TO ATTEND THIS SALE I
I T.C. BARGE & CO. I
hr ■a
B B
'Children’s Play Oxfords or all-leather
Sandals, sizes 8*4 to 11_$1.25
Sizes 11*4 to 2_$1.35
Children’s Patent or Kid leather one
strap Mary Jane slippers, sizes 5 to
8, at- $1.35
Sizes 8*4 to 11 at_$1.60
Sizes lli/2 to 2 at_$1.95
Infant’s Soft Soles in Patent, Black
and white kid at__60 cents
Our High-Grade line of White Slip
pers, in a dozen or more popular
patterns are the best in the coun
try, our $2.95 grade is sold in the
best stores at $4.50.
White Canvas Rubber Soles and Heel
Oxfords for Grown Girls and La
dies, at__$1.60
Men’s Brown Oxfords in six styles
with Rubber Heels at_$4.45
SAMPLE SHOE STORE
Branch of the Cham Shoe Stores Co. * "Better Shoes for Less Money.
L.______

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