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The Semi-weekly leader. (Brookhaven, Miss.) 1905-1941, June 14, 1922, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86074065/1922-06-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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BMULTS^^CERTAJWTOCOICE TT^IF IF 1P1 1 **" . **" YOU HEED THE LEADER TO KEEP
FROM LEADER ADVERTISEMENTS jp^ UP WITH ALL THE LOCAL HEWS
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THIRTY-SEVENTH YEAR OF PUBLICATION. - BROOKHAVEN, M3SSISSIPPL WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 1922 ~~ SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $2.50 BY THE YEAR.
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1 % Just a Moment— |
Many shoes are made with no real thought for the future.
They look well only while they’re new. They are shoes |
of the moment. * .
Walk-Overs are shoes for the future as well as for the
8 present. They look well even after long, hard wear.
That's because there is real quality in them—good ma
terials, good workmanship, and good style. • *
| McGRATH’S—Style Leaders [
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STATE EXECUTIVE
COMMITTEE TO MEET
Called Meeting in Jackson for
July 1 to Plan for August
. Primary.
The Democratic state .executive
committee has been called to meet
in Jackson on Saturday, July 1st, to
make arrangements for the party
primary to be held in August for the
nomination of a United States sena
tor Jo pucceed John Sharp Williams,
eight members of congress, and a
complete new list of chancellors and
circuit Judges.
Call for the meeting is signed by
the chairman, Judge Robert Powell,
of Jackson, and O. F. Lawrence, of
Grenada, secretary.
Plans to prevent white 'Republi
cans from participating in the Dem
ocratic primary will be' one of the
principal matters brought before the
committee. Members are expressing
themselves emphatically .on, this sub
ject and it is likely that a drastic
penalty will-be imposed.
TEXT OF THE CALL.
The formal call is issued this
— morning and is as follows: -
The State Democratic executive
committee, will meet in the senate
chamber in Jackson, Mississippi, at
ten o’clock, a. m., on Saturday, July
1st, 1922. A f»ll attendance of the
members is reqeusted as business of
Importance will cogie before the
committee.
Witness my signature, this 12th
of June, 1922.
O. F. LAWRENCE. Sec.
ROBT. POWELL, Chairman.
• • •
Epworth League Assembly Closes.
The Mississippi Conference Ep
worth League Assembly closed its
first annual session, after five days
of meeting in Brookhaven, last Sun
day. The services resulted in .40.
volunteers for service wherever the
Lord may direct at home or abroad.
More than 150 registered and it
is prophesied that there will be 250
another summer, since the Assembly
decided to come again to Whitworth
College, where they were given a
cordial hospitality.
The following officers were elected
for the coming year:
Pjesident, W. D. Hawkins; Vice
President, Truman Lewis; Secretary
Miss Erma M. Kile; Treasurer, Rev.
L. F. Alford; Era Agent, Miss Janet
Head. * . ■
Thanks for courtesies were ex
tended Pastor Lewis, Dr. I. W. Coop
er, John McGrath & Sons, Brookha
ven Bank &Trust Co., First Nation
al Bank and Merchants Grocery Co.
Maid and Matron’s Club.
After the charming meeting of
the week before with Mrs. James
Becker, the Maid and Matron’s Club
met last Thursday with Mrs. Eugene
Nalty in her attractive home and
on tomorrow at three-thirty in the
afternoon will again assemble at
their two-table game with Mrs. R&y
Davis at her pretty apartment rooms
in the Sauls building.
Mrs. Nalty had her^ lovely home
attractively decorated in yellow zin
nias complimentary to her gUest^and
Bfrved a delicious salad with sand
wiches and peach ice-cream.
The prize was won by Mrs. Nellie
Perkins and the booby was allotted
Mrs. James Becker.
Guests were Mrs. B. G. Hobbs, and
Misses Labile Cassedy arid Marie Me
grath.
Cotton is 21 cents.
PRETERMITS JUNE
COURT* TERM SESSION
• .
Judge Miller Could Not Ignore
Strong Petitions Against
Its Holding.
Hazlehurst, Miss., June 14, 1922.
Hon. R. Lee Moak, *
Circuit Clerk, Brookhdven, Miss.
My Dear Moak:- •
Recently I wrote you it was my
intention to hold the June term of
the Circait Court in Lincoln County.
Since then, I have received petitions
signed by nearly 600 citizens of Lin
coln county from all walks of life,
together with numerous letters and
phone messages, earnestly entreating
the term be pretermitted.
These requests are based on the
heavy rams and grassy conditions of
crops. To ignore petitioners, when
there is no counter petition, would
appear to be without justification or
excuse. The constitution requires
two terms of the Circuit Court be
held in each county, each year. In
Lincoln county these dates are fixed
for January and September. The
June term being by act of Legisla
ture and for civil business only.
It has always been my conviction
there was no authority to pretermit
any term fixed by the Constitution.
After long experience I have found
it generally best to hold all terms
of court at time designated by law,
and I have always stood r#ady to do
so, and. am now willing and ready
to hold the June term, but to do so
in the face of the urgent requests to
pretermit the term, would appear
unwise and unreasonable.
The June term of the Circuit Court
in Lincoln County, therefore, stands
pretermitted.
Respectfully yours,
D. M. MILLER,
Judge.
Child Welfare Nose and Throat Clin
if to be Held by1 Team No. 2
mi_3 _ r__ An
Xiiuiauaj, v LLii-v
Team No. 2 consisting of Drs.
Johnson, Frizell and Collins will hold
the next Child Welfare Throat Clin
ic at King’s Daughters Hospital on
Thursday, June 22nd at 8:00 a. m.
Team No. 3—Drs. Higdon, Mc
Leod and Warren will hold their
next Child Welfare Clinic at the
King’s Daughters Hospital Thursday,
July 6th.
Team No. 1, Drs. Flowers, Butler
and Arrington will hold their next
Child Welfare Clinic on Thursday,
July 13th. *
Team No. 2 will hold their next
clinic on Thursday, July 20th.
Team No. 3 will hold their next
clinic Thursday, July 27 th.
Parents of children suffering with
diseased tonsils and adenoids and
plan-to have them removed jat eith
er of the above clinics will please see
or write Child Welfare Nurse, Miss
Lula A. Davis, R. N.,a nd register
children with her for either of the
above dates at least 3 days before
clinic day. Parents will please note
that there will be a clinic held ev
ery Thursday in July alternately by
the above teams as given. This is
done to give the parents the oppor
tunity of getting these corrections
made before the child is placed in
school again. The Child Welfare
Nurse will be away on her vacation
in August and wants to get as many
1 corrections made as possible before
she leaves for her vacation.
School childrens special price for
this clinic work is $23.00. This
sum covers the cost of everything.
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QUIN WANTS SER
- VICE MEN TO HURR'
Asks for Them to Write Quic
—Time Expires on Aug
ust 9th.
Congressman Quin is still “on th
job*’ up in Washington although th
primaries are less than sixty daj
off. But Mr. Quin while busily ei
gaged on the Military Committee t
the House still finds time to serv
his people in a* personal way. H
is offering the valuable Farmer
Bulletins to farmers and housekeej
ers and he also says:
“Tell every ex-service man yo
know who thinks he is entitled t
compensation became of disabilit
incurred while in the service durin
the late war, that it is absolutely n<
cessary for him to file his claim e
once, as the law bars him from fllin
it after August 9th, 1922. I wi
dg all I can for every ex-service mai
Have each one write to me immedis
tely.
“The Senate is in a jam with it
business and there Is no telling whe
the Lower House can' fake a rdfees!
The Republicans have a big majoi
ity, but as they are split, many of th
Progressives will not support meat
CONGRESSMAN PERCY E. QUIN
ures the majority is attempting t
drive through for the benefit of th
special crowd in big business.
“I am glad to report that our Mil
itary Committee Is about ready to r«
port the Ford offer on Muscle Shoali
We are ten for Ford’s offer and ele^
en against one vital feature,
think the House will vote with c
ten. The turning over of the Mus
cle Shoals properties to Mr. For
means cheap fertilizer to the farmei
and more to the people of the Sout
than any other thing Congress hs
done within flf<5 years.”
Mr. Quin writes characteristicall
“If there is anything I can do for an
of my friends I hope they will wril
me." _
Former Governor Brough, of Ai
kahsas, speaking before a large ai
dience at‘Florence, Ala., was cheei
ed to the echo when he declared ths
“unless this Congress gives Musci
Shoals to Henry Ford the people wi
elect a new Congress that will <3
it.” Governor Brough was show
over the Muscle Shoals project by
committee from the Florence Chan
ber of Commerce. He expressed ti
conviction that work would be h
gun on Wilson Dam by July 1.
Some one rises to remark for -D
Brough’s benefit that no matU
“Whats’ The Matter With Mississi]
pi" in his opinion or in her legisli
ture or within congressional hay
ber representatives at Washingtc
have for years stood for those mea
ures they believed were to her inte
est. n
And Congressman Quin is foreme
in the efforts to “put Muscle Shoa
over'’ and In serving his people i
home.
Miss Margaret Lackey, secretai
of the Woman's Missionary Unit
of the Baptist State convention, le
yesterday afternoon for Indianapol
to attend the Northern Baptist coi
vention. Miss Lackey goes as tl
delegate from the Southern Bapti
W. M. U.,.and is the sole represent
tive of this great women’s organiz
tion at the northern assembly. Th
is quite a well deserved honor f<
Miss Lackey, which is appreciati
also-by Baptist women of Jacket
gad the »t#te,-Ciwiea-J4«fV,
D BERRIES DRAW VIS
g ITORS TO HAMMOND
: Auto Party Fostered by Kiwanis
S Club Make Trip to Straw- .
berry Fields.
= Twenty-five live wires from Brook
S haven and vicinity—members of the
g Kiwanis Club and farmers from the
5 trucking belt of Lincoln county— '
■5 motored to Hammond, La., Tuesday
3 for the purpose of investigating the
5 growing of strawberries and to se
5 cure information arid data for the
“ benefit of farmers and truckmen of
g this locality. That* the trip was an
— unqualified success from every view
E poiYit is the unanimous opinion ex
EE .pressed by all of the party.
E It has long been the dream of C.
E B. Perkins, president of the Kiwanis
5 club, to interest the farmers and
5 business men of this community ~ln
5 the growing of strawberries as a mon
5 ey-crop, and yesterday’s trip to the
! Louisiana city is considered an im
5 portant initial stride in the fulfill
5 ment of his dream.
5 When the Brookhaven party arriv
s ed in Hammond they were met by a
5 welcoming committee and escorted to
5 the Oaks potel where a splendid
5 banquet was all spread and waiting,
g W. H. Nalty, a former Brookhaven
g boy, an<^ former secretary of the
g Hammond Chamber of Commerce, in
g troduced Hammond to the visiting
E Brookhavenites, and the visitors,, in
s turn were introduced to Hamomnd
“ by C. B. Perkins, president of the Ki
wanis club.
] .Secretary Nalty, after expressing
„ his pleasure at meeting the distin
- guished visitors from his former
home, told of the Tangipahoa parishs
standing second in the column of
f “cash products counties” of the Uni
ted States. He said that Los Ange
les county, Calif., was first and a
It opunty in the farming section of
Pennsylvania third.
He said that owing to the money
to be made in berries, there was great
danger of the “one crop” system—
e strawberries—3ust as in parts of the
e country the "one crop”—cotton—and
s it has proved disastrous.
He was sure of one' thing; though,
f and that was that there would never
e be an overproduction of strawberries.
® He stated that Tangipahoa parish
>’ Jiad shipped 1700 cars of berries this
- season, at an income of three and one
half million dollars. He told of the
n co-operation between farmers ani
0 business men, and the establishment
y of experiment stations by- the gov
& ernment.
■ “’J'here is no distinguishing line
t between ‘the farmers of the cornmun
S ity and ‘the city of Hammond. The
1 farmers are of the city and the city ;
■ is part of'the country,” declared Mr.
- Nalty. “It’s the only basis on which ;
the full co-operation between the city
s and county can be had.” {
i *He mentioned the $50,000 fair f
grounds, the $50,000 National Bank}
■ building, the $40,000 city hall bdild®1^
e ing, ten new business buildings, 50
• new residence buildings, he dr cream
ery, new laundry and such, and bonds
voted for paving ten business blocks. •
He expressed a hope to see th#
time that a trucking belt extended
straight through from Jackson, Miss.
^ to beyond Hammond. ,
B. M. Morrison Welcomed the vis
itors and said this occasion was a
fore-runner of other pleasant visits
between the two sections. He was
very glad to liave^ the Brookhaveh
farmers come down and said they
must pay strict attention, so that
they could profit by the mistakes
made by the Hammond growers, as
well as by the successes.
C. B. Perkins extended the thanks
of the, Brookhaven people for the
great reception given them,, and in
vited them to arrange a trip to
Brookhaven, when the pleasure of
entertaining would be Brookhaven’s.
The visitors were taken to several
strawberry farms, and given facts
and figures concerning the growing
the marketing and the returns made
from strawberries. One particularly
profitable field of one and one-six
., teenth acres yielded a cash rturn of
0 $2,800 with baly*$70 expense in the
e way of extra dielp, and an estimated
expense of $60 for fertilizers. This,
. it was stated, was an exceptional
- case, but many instances were cited
i. where the clear profits were nearly
- as high.
1 % The failures in berry growing, they
s were fold, came from those who tried
- to pose as “Berry Kings” by plant
d ing too much acreage, and Then fail
b ing to cultivate any part of it pro
h perly. From 2 to 6 acres seemed to ‘
s be the ideal berry farm.
It is the intention of the Brook
y haven people who are behind the
y movement to start at once getting the
e farmers lined up for nexT year’s mar
ket, and having them announce the
number of acres to'be planted to ber
ries. The matter will be taken up at
!_ today’s meeting of the Kiwanis club
t and a committee probably appointed '
e to assist in every way possible in get
U ting the farmers started off in the
0 right manner.
11 Among the new business concerns
a to be added this week to the city’s
list of commercial establishments
e may be noted The exclusive gents’
*’ furnishings emporium of Gulley &
Hobbs on West Cherokee street, and
me general mercnanaise esiaoiisn
ir ment of J. W. Fore, also on West
Cherokee. The new building to be
l~ occupied by the Lily Oil Company,
3. corner Alonticello and Davis Fore
11 streets, is scheduled for completion
5" by August 1. The Lincoln County
r" Board of Supervisors, catching the
spirit of improvements, is having
new floors laid in the sheriff’s office
ls. and chancery clerk’s office, and all
lt the lower floors repainted and a new
-coat of colors applied to the seats
in the circuit court room. The court
>y room ls attractive now to everybody
n but law-breakers. ,
ft: --
is Some of our community children'
i- do not have to wait to go to school
ie to demonstrate their home-training.
3t At an earlier age than five they go
i- to church with their mothers and be
i- come arrogant pew-holders and mas
ts ters of the situation to. the annoy
n ance of preachers and congregations.'
id A baby’s cry is not so bad but chil
n dren old enough to be controlled
ought'to be.
SENSATIONAL1
JUNE
THIS ANNOUNCEMENT WHICH COMES RIGHT FROM HEADQUARTERS WILL MEAN MORE TO
THE PEOPLE OF THIS VICINITY IN THE WAY OF A MONEY SAVING EVENT THAN ANY OTH
ER OCCASION IN THE HISTORY OF YOUR CITY. - C|WE ARE NOT HOLDING YOU OFF UN
TIL LATE IN THE SEASON TO OFFER THESE REMARKABLE VALUES, BUT RIGHT NOW WHEN
YOU NEED THEM TO THE BEST ADVANTAGES FOR THE ENTIRE SUMMER, DO WE BEGIN
THIS GREAT CLEARANCE SALE.. <JTHE UNCHANGEABLE COLD WEATHER THROUGHOUT THE
EAST HAS CAUSED SEVERAL OF THE WELL KNOWN SHOE FACTORIES TO BE OVERSTOCKED
WITH SEASONABLE MERCHANDISE AND OUR BUYERS HAVE BEEN WIDE AWAKE, ALWAYS ON
THE MARKET AWAITING SUCH OPPORTUNITIES, HAVE TAKEN -ADVANTAGE OF THE MANU
FACTURERS LOSS WHICH HAS BEEN THE CASE, AND WE ARE DAILY RECEIVING SHIPMENTS
OF THE GREATEST VALUES EVER KNOWN, WHICH WILL BE OFFERED AT THIS SALE.
-' .. • • • i ■
Lasting 7 Days Only Beginning Saturday Morning, June 17

LADIES
SHOES
Ladies Brown and Black Kid Oxfords with
Military rubber heel, nice.Tor dress, value AQ
$6.00. Sale Price___~_
Ladies Black and Brown Satin One-Strap Slip
pers, with Baby Louis and Full Louis Heels,
made of genuine Cedar Cliff Satin. Value J 4Q
$8.00. Sale Frice_
Ladies Patent One, Two or Three Strap Slip
pers with Nude or Grey backs, with Baby
Louis, Spanish and Full Louis Heels, we
have these slippers in ten classy patterns,
- in the best of material and workmanship. (Jjr AO'
None sold less than $10.00. ' Sale Price_
Ladies Black Kid Two-Strap Slippers with flat
rubber heels, no cap or toe, for dress 6r com
fort every day wear, the same in Black Kid d»0 nA
I Oxford with round toe. Val. $4. Sale Price */
Ladies White Canvas Strap Slippers with One,
Two or Three Straps, with Baby Louis, Full
Louis or Military Heels, a very fine grade d»A 7A
and sold at $4.50. Sale Price--- I */
LADIES
SHOES
Ladies White Canvas Sport Oxfords trimmed J
with black or tan leather, military heels, QA A A
sizes 3 to8. Value $3.50. Sale Price../_ $L.ud
Ladies Patent Low Heel Pumps and One-strap d»A A A
slippers, sizes 4 to 8. Special for this Sale.. J
Special, lot Ladies. Brown Satin One-Strap d»A AQ
slippers, Louis Heels. Val 7. For this sale at «p ' *
Ladies Patent Leather Grecian Strap Slippers Q A AQ
with Junior Louis heels. Val. $7.50. Sale price
Grown Girls Patent two-strop buckle slippers, d*A jq
flat rubber heels, sizes 3 to 8. Val. $5.50, at «p0.4O J
Grown Girls Black Satin Flapper strap slip- Q A jq
pers, low heels, wide strap & buckle. Val. $7_ J
Same as above Slipper in White Canvas Flap- QA AA
per strap. Value $4. Sale Price_I */
Misses Patent or Kid Leather one-strap Slippers, Flat
Heels, sizes lH/2 to 2 at $1.99; Sizes 8i/2 ta.ll at $1.48
and sizes 5 to 8 at_1_ $1.19
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EXTRA SPECIAL
250 Pair of Indies Shoes and Lowquarters
in several different styles and sizes, prices
ranging from 98c a pair up, have been
thrown out on racks for this Great Sale.
LADIES HOSE
We will sell 200 pair of Ladies Full Fash
ion ed Genuine Silk Thread Hose in Black,
White. Brown, Grey and Nude colors, a
$2.25 Hose at $1.33.
Pointing Out to You
Better Shoes for Less Money
HOSIERY
Special for ihis Sale we will sell 20 dozen j
pair of Meas and Ladies Silk Hose, regtT- J
lar price 75 cents, at 48 cents a pair, j
The people throughput this vicinity are }
still talking about the remarkable values |
we offered at our sale last January. The
values we are offering you at our June Sale
will keep you talking about the Sample |
Shoe Store for the next twelve months to j
come.
■■■■■bmhbbhmhmbhhmhhhbim !
Shoes.
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Men’s Brown Calf English last, or round toe
shoes for dress wear, with rubber heels. d»0 A O'
Value $6.00. Sale Price__
Men's Lowquarters in Brown or Blgck Leather
English last and conservative toes with and d*Q AO
iwthout rubber heels. Value $5.00, Sale price tPJ.DO
; Men’s Joseph M. Herman U. S. Army Shoes,
the only -genuine army shoes sold in this
town, Tan Russet Calf, sold at $6.00. Sale gg
Men’s Solid Leather Scouts with Full Grain
Oak Leather innersoles, all sizes. Worth $3. d»f AO
Sales price_i__
Men’s Grain Calf U. S. Army Shoes 100 per
cent leather. Medium weight. Regular price OA
$4.50. aSle Price_;____ vJtZU
Children’s
.
Shoes.


Children’s Play Oxfords and Tan Sandals, all OA
leather, sizes IV/2 to 2 at--— v 1 • £«/
Same as above, sizes 8Vfc to 11 will*be sold in d* 1 IQ
this sale at___*_ J
Same as above, sizes 5 to 8. June Clearance djl AA
Sale Price_ v 1 •
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Men’s Black Kid Gaiters ancf Plain Toe Lace d»Q /JQ
Shoes, an old Man’s delight. Value $5.00. «pO.UO
Men’s U. S. Officer’s Last Shoes and Lowquar
ters, a nice dress shoe as well as a comfort- d* J ‘QO
able everyday shoe. Value $7. Sale price—
IN ORDER T 0 MAKE JUNE THE BANNER MONTH IN SALES WITH US THROUGHOUT OUR
CHAIN OF STORES WE ARE OFFERING THE BUYING PUBLIC STYLISH QUALITY FOOTWEAR
FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY AT REMARKABLY LOW PRICES. OUR LIST OF NEW CUSTOMERS
IS GROWING RAPIDLY, SO COME AT YOUR EARLIEST CONVENIENCE AND BE ONE OF THE
MANY WHO SAVE $1.00 TO $4.00 ON EVERY PAIR OF SHOES YOU BUY. .
'L ^ ' ~ ~ io-mrr-4*
MEET ME AT THE
SAMPLE SHOE STORE
Save $1.00 to $4.00 on Every Pair. “Better Shoes (or Less Money.”
BRANCH OF CHAIN SHOE STORES CO.
BROOKHAVEN, - - MISSISSIPPI
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