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The Semi-weekly leader. (Brookhaven, Miss.) 1905-1941, August 16, 1922, Image 1

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86074065/1922-08-16/ed-1/seq-1/

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RESULTS ARE CERTACT TO COM A W=^k VPQ 1 YOU SEED THE LEASER TO KEEP
FROM LEADER ADVERTI8EMEKT8 A I J F J # PP WITH ALL THE LOCA^HEWB
THIRTY-SEVENTH YEAR OF PUBLICATION. . * BROOKHAVEN, MISSISSIPPI WEDNESDAY, AUG. 16, 1922 SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $2£S BY THE YEAR.
VARDAMAN LEADS IN RACE
FOR UNITED STATES SENATE
- • % > y.
Second Primary Will Be Necessary—Quin’s Majority Over Wall for
Congress is 5,342—Simmons Defeats Miller for Circuit Judge
---Official Lincoln County Vote by Precincts.
In the closest race for the senate
In Mississippi since John Sharp Wil
liams defeated him 12 years ago by
648 votes, former Senator James K.
Vardaman has a lead of approxima
tely 400 votes over former Congress
man Hubert D. Stephens in the race
for the Democratic nomination for
the Senate.
With about 86 per cent of the
vote counted, it is believed that Var
danian's lead will go to 2,000 and
possibly higher as the hill precincts
where he is specially strong are al
ways the last to report.
A run-off is certain between Var
daman and Stephens, however as Miss
Kearney with 14,000 votes, counted
and probably more than 15,000 in
Bight, will prevent either leader from
having a majority.
With Vardaman's strength show
ing in rural communities and Ste
phens’ support in the cities, if Var
daman has any considerable lead in
the first primary, deductions could
permissibly be made from the fact
that hitherto it has been the rural
rather than the urban vote which
has come out strongly in the second
primaries in Mississippi..
Two sitting congressmen, the vet
eran, Thomas Upton Sisson, and Ross
Collins, serving his first term, ap
pear defeated. Loper has an appar
ent majority over both Collins and
Mrs. Arnold, their woman opponent.
Loper entered the race after Collins
had charged that Mrs. Arnold's hus
band had negro blood and his can
didacy and nomination were a pro
test against the character of cam
paign which ensued.
Jackson, Miss., Aug. 16. — Both
the headquarters of Former United
States Senator James K. Vardaman
and Hubert Stephens, former mem
ber of Congress, who, on the face
of incomplete unofficial returns from
yesterday’s state-wide primary are
running nip and tuck in the race for
the Democratic senatorial nomina
tion, early today expressed satisfac
tion with the trend of the returns.
• “Our returns Indicate that Mr.
Stephens is leading and that he will
hold his lead but we regard it as a
possibility that a second primary may
be necessary to decide the issue,"
Stephens’ headquarters said shortly
after 1 o’clock this morning.
"The race thus far apparently is
close, but with a number of isolated
sections where Mr. Vardaman will
poll a heavy vote yet to report, we
regard the situation as quite favor
able," Vardaman’s headquarters said
at the same hour.
Miss Belie Kearney has carried
Adams county for U. S. Senator by a
majority of 75 votes over her near
est opponent, Stephens.
Favored by fair weather over a
greater part of the state, on the
heels of one of the most intense po
litical campaigns in years, Mississip
pi Democrats went to the polls in
force to express their choice as par
ty nominee between Former Senator
James K. Vardaman, Hubert D. Ste
phens, and members of Congress from
six districts and members of the ju
diciary.
Early reports indicated a heavy
vote with women exercising their
rights of franchise for ttlie first time,
voting in numbers.
In advance of the actual count es
timates of the total vote ranged from
150,000 to 176,000.
ftuin’i Majority 5,362.
Congressman Quin won majorities
over his opponent in the following
counties
Amite _ 400
Pike _______. 1,129
Wilkinson _ 300
Copiah_ 819
Claiborne _ 574
Jefferson_ 440
Franklin_ 459
Adams_1,241
Wall’s majorities over Quin:
Lincoln_197
Walthall_ 111
Quin’s majority over Wall for the
entire District was 5,362.
In Lincoln county Vardaman re
ceived 1883 votes, Stephens 1077 and
Miss Kearney 274. Vardaman’s ma
HOW THE CANDIDATES RAN IN LINCOLN COUNTY-OFFICIAL.
is * s a P 2 o 5 2 3®°?S!:s®2£> o w ◄ n o w k £ h
S ® S^SooSiSflC^OaSSa'lc • p i J ® o g. w 2.
* * ? • E P5J 2 S» 5 3 w <g g 8 a g £ gff
0 o ? S 2. « * » 2 5 I s J fi !■ * 8 « h S-r^ 0# ft £ sr
! 2 o p o « o <j 2 » a <J®?ao»§q? £* p i 2. » ® ° ^ ^
i R | g p 3 S & ? ! § } | j? % § I ! * i * 5 I ? F » ® f|
• « fr!?f i 5 * f i i ? i : ! f 5 i;
1 | u ? : r ? : i -i : \ s M
._• ■!■!»!!!•! ' » I i 1 i ' i ! » ! ' ' ! !_I ! 1
- x ypj | pi I i
1 01 Va<?' ^vILaman 2431153 34 34 87 31 60 66 97 53 46 45|53 86 48 95 43 59 110 69 103 71 58 113 18 37 1883
£pt.t£ t/t^Tpmw ".. 90 66 4 0 9 4 5 6 3 7 10' 2 1 1 20|10 3 4| 1| 3 6 4 8 3i 4 0 274
HUBERT D STEPHENSi""""" 429 217 20 10 10 10 18 27 31 22 37 11 3 11 63 43 14 18 3 2 7 22 20 4 23 2 1077
-
For Congress, 7th District—
HUGH V WALL _ 347 183 27 16 87 2134 40 84 32 52 3152 63 35 62 32 4010053 78 75 56 8518 29 1732
PERCY E. QUIN_IIIIIIIIIIIIZIIII|417 262 32 27 17 24 49 61 46 49 45 26 4 33 96 89 29 39 13 21 33 22 29 33 27 121535
-1-1-1-1 v““i I I I I I I I I I I-’’! I I I I I I I
I - " ^
.Judc^Supreme^Court, Une*. Term— ^ igg 3Q 2Q g4 lg gl g3 95 4g 40 34 2g 67 49 63 3g 56 g7 61 g3 40 43 103 40 211799
EDGAR M. LANEIIII”IIIIIIIIIII 343 213 22 18 20 24 27 28 33 32 64 22 25 20 65 7120 21 1513 24 53 38 17 5]18 1241
r
Judge Supreme Court, Full Term—
W H COOK _ 334167 16 8413 52 60 88 41 30 29 24 63 46 56 37 57 81 57 74 39 40 92 27 18 1625
EDGAR M. LANE_I__I_I__I_317 196 18 20 24 28 32 26 36 49 22 2717 60 6818 21 16 8 2153 39 1818181168 *
Circuit Judge, 4th District—
n M MTT.T RR • 420 227 29 3 3519 37 47 26 141515 10 14 42 78 26 36 50 27 53 27 43 49 27 151364
E. J.‘SIMMONSZIIZZIIIIIIIIIIZZZI331 212 24 40 69 27 45 51104 68 81 43 47 84 89 69 34 42 62 47 59 70 41 70 17 25 1851
Chancellor, 5th District—
DeWITT ENOCHS 383 233 31113 35 12 24 32 61 22 19 18 24 23 61 69 15 25 50 29 41 55 51 45 13 26 1410
V. J. STRICKER_356 195 22 25 70 33 57 63 69 58 69 33 29 68 64 68 43 53 52 42 62 40 30 74 31 11 1717
•' 1 ' . •" "1 3
We Fire the FIRST BIG GUN
in opening the campaign for
FALL BUSINESS
ITS A RED-HOT SHOT
2,500 yards | j
good, standard quality, bright NEW
OUTING, at
L—only 10c the yard -
• »
0 " """..' ■,,r ' '
This wonderful bargain item is displayed on cen-'
ter counter, rtiain aisle. Keep in touch with us
for all your Fall and Winter needs* and save
money.
jority over both opponents was 532.
Wall carried Lincoln by a majority
of 197 and Walthall by 111 votes
over Quin, but reports from other
counties show Quin’s majority in the
district to be 5,362.
Hon. E. J. Simmons won over
Judge D. M. Miller, for Circuit Court
Judge by a small majority, as indi
cated by the latest returns.
Judge W. H. Cook was elected Su
preme Court Judge and Judge V.,J.
Strieker won over Hon. DeWitt
Enochs for Chancellor of tv'i Dis
trict.
Vardanian Claims 5,000 Majority.
A telephone message from Varda
man Headquarters at Jackson at 3
p. m., today states that Senator Var
da man’s lead over Hon. Hubert D.
Stephens is about 5,000 and it is
claimed will be about 8,000 when
the full count is made. Miss Kear
ney’s vote is 16,000, approximately.
Incomplete Returns by Counties.
Incomplete returns by counties in
the contest for United States Sena
tor in the Democratic primaries in
Mississippi to succeed John Sharp
Williams are as follows :
Varda
County Kearney Stephens man
Adams — __ 543 464 440
Alcorn __ 227# 942 1229
Amite __ 32 164 163
Attala__ 146 986 969
Benton_ 14 113 169
Bolivar __ _ 169 904 484
Calhoun _ 170 660 890
Carroll _ 181 472 763
Chickasaw 287 785 1266
Pertoto nr n o tri 1 rno
‘Claiborne _ 266 376 226
Clarke*_ 173 499 659
Clay - 450 1321 699
Coahoma_ 348 629 229
Copiah _ 50 343 269
Covington _ 274 690 1056
DeSoto _: 92 392 169
Forrest _ 110 338 334
Franklin_ 40 49 52
George ___ 40 174 148
Greene _ 36 438 307
Grenada __ 175 514 327
Hancock _14 s 8 14
Harrison __ 601 1258 1055
Hinds _407 1870 857
Holmes ___ 264 796 663
Humphreys 108 336 308
Issaquena _ 35 22 53
Jackson — 217 -841 625
Jasper— No report <
Jeff Davis 81 1390 617
Jefferson __ 126 373 278
Jones , 758 1444 1884
Kemper _51 61 47
Lafayette, - 187 682 1844
Lamar '_'60 81 240
Lauderdale 542 2343 2219
Leake—No report
Lee, _ 233 1460 2170
Leflore ___ 137 987 882
Lincoln __ 274 1077 1883
Lowndes. _ 272 625 4*51
Madison 492 406 224
Marion _ 184 517 849
Marshall 5 \ 94 22
Monroe 410 1369 1808
Montgomery 150 1138 835
Neshoba —No report.
Newton 282 961 -1630
Noxubee 151 667 154
Oktibbeha - 159 727 671:
~ J . ‘
r"~" ~ ~ »
"BETTER SHOES BRANCH OF
j FOR LESS MONEY” | |lft CHAIN SHOE STORES CO. |
END OF THE SEASOT
CLEARANCE SAL
I
RIGHT THIS WAY for the Thrifty Shoppers of Brookhaven and vicinity; for you
know you will find unparalleled Values here. If We won’t carry any merchandise
over if price and quality will move it. You know the quality of shoes we handle.
Well, here’s a good opportunity to judge our prices. Everything marked in
plain figures. YOU CAN SEE FOR YOURSELF. The early shopper is the one
who profits most.
I It’s the real event of the year—It’s a Sale that shows an absolute clearance of High Grade, Desirable Foot
wear—It’s a sale that represents NO PROFIT TO US—but it’s the Sample Shoe Store’s way—no goods earned
over from season to season. Every word in this ad rings true.
INUATTUICCAIt THE ECONOMY OF BUYING WANTED MERCHANDISE AT A PRICE.
IWH! IMOOHLC THE OFFERING OF INDUCEMENTS TO ENCOURAGE SHOPPING.
MEANS TO YOU ^ ™E saving of money to people who read ads.
* IW IWW THE SAFETY OF ATTENDING A SALE AT A ONE PRICE STORE.
HERE ARE A FEW OF OUR NUMEROUS VALUES—DOZENS OF OTHERS YOU SHOULD NOT FAIL TO SEE.
> 11 ■■11 1 ^
Grown Girls Black Skin
ner’s Satin Slippers
wide flat heel, wide
One-Strap with buckle
—Value $5.50, sizes 3
to 3. Price
$3.45
:: >
* . 1 '
Ladies Black Kid One-Strap
Slippers with Junior Louis /"!> m x-v mm
Heels, Beaded Vamp, Strap. /I w rv
I Value $7.50, sizes 3 to 8_aljl TTa
t .. , ...■■■■■■■■ ..J
/ .■;
Grown Girls Patent Leather %
One-Strap Slippers with flat g^y g~\ g~\
rubber heel and solid leath- U. 3 kn
er scles. Special Price_4II ^ B yj
[White Canvas Lace Oxfords
and One-Strap Slippers with ^ g^'
flat rubber heels, all sizes 1
for Latjics and Grown Girls. .^Tl J[ a yj yj
t.• .. ."T”.*
I Ladies Felt Bedroom Slippers
with Moccasin soles, several gty -4 g~\ g~\
colors, all sizes. Something 1 I Iff 1
I - every woman should have_All a
L_/
"
Brown Oxfords, flat leather
heels. Good for school wear. /-v ^ mmm I
Solid leather soles, sizes 2 to U. 3 11
7 for growing girls at-i. a Jy
- >
Ladies White Nu-Buck One
Strap Slippers with Junior
Louis Heels, High Grade
material turn sole, all sizes. _

__ %
Men’s Solid Leather Scouts
full grain Oak Leather in
soles, all sizes_
---
Men’s Jos. M. Herman U.S. Ar
my Shoes, russet leather, the ^<9^ m » •
only original U. S. Army U. /\ 11 pv
Shoe sold in Brookhaven_4IJ *-J< a
/"' ... 1111 ^
Children’s Patent or Kid leath- *
er Mary Jane Slippers at ^ ^ »
Special prices, sizes 8 to 11 1 Px
at $1.45, sizes ll'/j to 2 at_ a yj
0
\
You can always remember us as THE STORE THAT BROUGHT THE PRICES OF SHOES DOWN in Brookhaven.
SAMPLESHOESTORE
(
“Better Shoes for Less Money.” Branch of Chain Shoe Stores Co.
V-.■' ■ ' ■■ ■...—.:.— ‘ .
Panola __1 267 704 567
Pearl River 205 600 985
Perry ___ 21 178 130
Pike _1 160 433 393
Pontotoc __ 100 606 1732
Prentiss • __ 177 865 1215
Quitman _ 76 408 253
Rankin ___ 99 646 372
Scott _ 350 803 1361
Sharkey _ 39 189 140'
Simpson _ 160 1404 976
Smith—No Report.
Stone ____ 59 £90 91
Sunflower 2 65 51
Tallahatchie 160 652 527
Tate _ 224 515 365
Tippah ___ 27 899 » 2629
Tishomingo 198 654 791
Tunica __ 32 76* 255
Union _ 104 1024 1567
Walthall __ 130 339 660
Warren __ 372 1426 123
Washington 172 764 255
Wayne ___ 88 505 364
Webster __ 86 474 825
Wilkinson _ 20 60 59
Winston. __ 154 675 774
Yalobusha 198 767 865
Yazoo _ 266 1028 946
Totals_13,989 50,023 50,884
Worthy Grand Matron 0. E. S, in
Brookhaven.
.The local Chapter of the Order of
Eastern Star had the pleasure of
having as its guests of honor on last
Friday evening, Mrs. D. F. McCul
lough, of Columbus, who is Worthy
Grand Matron of the Grand Chapter
of Mississippi and Mrs. Isabelle Dees,
of Crystal Springs, District Grand
Lecturer.
a fine membership was present to
■? - si'';
greet the visitors and the talks made
by the visiting officers were encour
aging and heartily enjoyed.
A fine report was made regarding
the achievements and future plans of
the Chapter. The membership ros
ter shewed that within the past six
teen months the Chapten had grown
from about thirty members to one
hundred and seventy one, and the
present prospects are that the first of
the New Year will show two hundred
members enrolled.
Interesting and instructive talks
were made by several members after
which the Chapter adjourned to en
ter the banquet .hall where delightful
refreshments were served and an hour
of good fellowship thoroughly enjoy
ed.
_ \ ' _
Boys Are Having A Great Time at
Camp DeMolay.
The many boys in recreation camp
at Camp DeMolay,* 12 miles east of
Brookhaven, are thoroughly enjoying
themselves out on old Fair RiveV, al
though the last few days’ bad weath
er has not been to their liking at all.
I Sunday there were many visitors to
see the boys, the parents and kins
men of some of* them coming as far
as 60 or 70 miles in their cars to see
the youngsters all together and their
special boys in particular.
mr* $75.00 Drill Press for
$45.00 at C. B. Perkins
1 Hardware.
tfc/. *■'
-';* *:' ",r •
a:, ’V' ...
... ' J"_ _
Mississippi Teachers Better Paid.
Jackson, Miss., Aug. 13. — That
the teacliers of Mississippi fully ap
preciate the increased salaries that
have come to them during the last
four years is indicated, says Profes
sor W. N. Taylor, executive secre
tary of the Mississippi Educational
Association, by the unprecedented at
tendance of Mississippi teachers at
the various summer schools. Figures
compiled by the executive secretary
of the association show that approx
imately 5000 teachers have taken
*
training at summer schools this sum
mer. About 3800 of these attended 4
the different normals in this state
and 1200 went to institutions in dif
ferent parts of the country. Pea
body, Tulane and Asheville drew tho
largest numbers while smaller num
bers went to such institutions as the
University of Chicago, Columbia U
niversity, University of Tennessee,
Virginia, Wisconsin, Illinois and In

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