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Daily Yellowstone journal. [volume] (Miles City, Mont.) 1882-1893, November 10, 1891, Image 2

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DAILT JOURNAL
II m i AL MIi.
tZL. C 7Y. NTANA.
rseest* N .venebr 10. 1iS1.
MILLIONS IN BARBED WIRE.
" emA t Waa is Wabl Nreuftee
Umeae naem Kie SGeet aert.me.
e middesst thing I saw in a journey
o D e west was the old fashioned rail
for in Penesylvania. Ohio, eastere
hias and southern Michigan. How
dnld at fiel not to have permitted the
Ilag knee to be invented 200 years be
!w k wasl Probably enough labor
4ma timber have been wasted in the
baBding of the old "worm" fences in
the past to pay off fifty national debts
low ourn
It makes one almost weep to think of
the backs that have been broken, of
the hands worn out, the energies sapped,
the boys kept from bchool-in felling
trees, splitting logs, driving posts, lay
mil rails for those thousands of miles of
mil fenee! When our western farmer
wants a fence now he buys a few poste
and a lot of barbed wire. Three tmen
can put up half a mile of fence in it
day.
"lid you ever hear how Ellwood. tlt
barbed wirt, man. of IhKalb. l .' .
made his mu'onwy a.'kt I oa- of 'i y
tain acquaintanes. -Well. .ou
twelve "r tmlt*' itar '.n :.,,ai in'
ing a litti wire iin hs hu k-inth in.
puttingr tl., I sr!, .n .,th a p , .r
pineher'.. n)n i a ' :n: ijpe of ' ii
th e rain . a t i . = t ll v i. n h t tl t r
dso!e I like -t _ I ti .., t!: :-.
E8.llwood to :.",., th t ret ,at th road
celling it."
*After a we t n s
eompare I t'. t ; i .
wire ai great lit . . 1 i7
But they w.r' pr , - r ' , r. I
they thed itt u . tI at f I
Ellwood.* WhI :" ' I . ýI u-i.
aeas was thtey west" faut a ft c ,r.
dersandshook tir h'.iI 'uitiniilv.
'Not much in ' It It. r tr% again.
said Ellwood. .Well. if ou l1 g.v" Ii
afire yearco' * , -,a 'i. oit:1.
me Iowa. Ar'. 'ao a'.'l 'T.'exat u" 11 gin
oat and see ,, nar Sca di .1'
"Ellwood ogrie a I aind one If the
young men start- I I -r T-xi- In a
week he sent ant onrir for a ear I .ad of
wire. Ellwood v a. .a'toni-Ledl. It
would take himn a illtnth to iiiake a
ear load. 11 earri -rI the i. tt-er to h:
hank. 'Must hb. s'aiie mti take,' Le
said. 'No,' sail the batik,-r. 'itk
plain. He wantrl a ear Io' l ' 'Inn
pnasible,' replied El'ood, 'lIi tele
Waph him.' The rephy eatlit Ytei. a
as load. but mak'- it thirne ear loads.
Whip quick.' Again Ellwood went ti.
Lis banker. He was puzzled. It
seemed like a hoax to him that any
ems should want three car loads of
wire.
"Preposterous' The banker finally
emovinced him the order was genuine
'Kr. Banker,' said Ellwood, 'uI a
ear man. I'w worth two or three
lboasand dollars. flow much can I
ism on this bank for on my reputa
Seo and my prospects i' Fifteen hun
dnd dollars. Good. (Give me 85K0
new.' In an hour Ell wood was on his
way to Chicago. In two weeks he was
aaking barbed wire by machinery. In
1= years he was worth e14,(000, o0."
Cor. Augusta Chronicle.
What Did b.1the I..r.e nee?
The writer was olee. in the I-le of
rye, being driven al'n a lonely road
be a one horse cart. Su'ldenly the ani
am* began to 'hy violently toward one
sie of the road, though there was
sathing in sight th it could possibly
]hve frightened it, both sides of the
1ad being flat moor! und for miles.
Nowever. nothing could induce the
mgeture to wove forward until the
diver eventually got down and led
Mf past theobjectionable thing, what
ever it was. As he again took his seat
em the box he shook his head and said
apateriously Ah' he'll be seeing
imething that we cannot see: A man
was murdered h.re4jro years ago on
Oft very spot.
But this is no ceaSion of discussing
&equestion whet her animals in general,
ad bones in particular, have abnormal
gewers of viion which enable them to
ai the immnaterial. Anyhow, the for
altion of their eyes in no way warrants
nary such supposition, and probably, if
mme is anything in the stories, the
Mana sensitiveness and heightened in
ubet of the animals played no little
the ocearrences.-Chambers'
5ew agsseas Ass eemsd.
ab .1w t nses savwrs are IW
by Millg fruits seeds, barks
- aret inaetial ane
@age etaad euldasni& Thane
s apirits at wine, eomeM.
or Svewlosg semeae
be seobsm. Amg
tsa beas t jpume
bern bbs tie o~sag
And, a m be werned
M wA W by bhyelam
OFuee& dad etee a!
a11idtb b
be- -ta
away a at alrr tseas
I b
WHIST PLAYED SY SPIRIT HANDS.
?w. assel sa d seasa' aemarkabI. is
portemme in a Quete 6am.
This story 1 advance with reserve.
It was told me by a young medico, and
we all know that medical students are
of a peculiarly reserved, reticent and
sober race, averse to exaggeration and
remarkable for the veracity of their
anecdotes. He who related the follow
hIg astonishing experience told me that
it took place at St. Bartholomew's. or
perhaps It wasat Guy's or St. Thomas
The esmential thing Is that It took pla e
at a hospital
It was evening and not late. One of
the resident house physicians, a your e
man with a friend, also a young med I
cal man, whose evidence can be pri
eured to corroborate the story, we"
playing a double dummy. They lIn
been playing some time, nothing in
usual happening. They were seated at
a square table. One of them, at t:"
beginning of the new game. had ti
deal with his own dummy, as is th
rules at double dummy. *When he hail
finished a most wonderful thing hmu
pened. The cards of the two durunuie,
were taken up by invi.ible handl,
which arranged their and hell them in
the usual fanlike form. It was a- if
the earus were in the air. The tw.,
wen Ioiked at each 'ithur and at thn-i
phenomenon with stupe.farti.in.
If they hal not hii-ti nm.-n of saieien
they w'mnll have dle-I -bri'kii.'. Theu
tune of the dultnuieue h-, :l. were sharply
rapp," I on the ttabl," T'hat nwao+
play lwhtI 00iird fIle..ft :. an I w ith
a Li'-p. he I-,I. Th- [lh, ii- vi,
ibl" dumumni." we. all r~L~t. The" lead
in, partler tUok theii tro-. i-l rnturnue 1.
cAnning ther "tit tot ,t *w tit' hanI she
held. I iur ,-, I letb .' by h t in :.- "t
th au:v were vi-.1b the hol- aI. und ~rut
that holtl the. siru l. but a 'thin, ove'r,"
SIle of the pluly. r, a i` a n *u- -utun w-:i
bare arits ,taunt, fri -tu a tI,, ,.-f
white uc': . hr tie r" hle I ringl r1
the- Th.ue (ther Wt tu a mu tt,,
an urulinarv ccait I-' ve and white i--uf
The ruienr pit Il wititir pi pe.s Th,"y
playi-d the genre ii --I ;n t ilence
Presently it hei-a-utu :,pparent thint the
lad} playel a nut-terly canet'. Sih' held
gi ""i 'ards: so ,lid hr partner. They
scored in the tirst rtb- ilouble. treble
and the rub, and in the second-treble,
single and the rub
Never." my narrator totil Iou. d'
I play with a finer player She -ene.! I
to kinw by instinct where every card
in the pack was. At the end of the
double rubs. r the unne disappeared.
They went to. y as they carne. I have
never seen theta siniee, though I often
invited themn to comne by dealing the
car-.1 on the sable. I have often won
dered who the 4ady was: young, as I
gathered fron the appearance of her
arms; a gentlewoman. as was shown by
the taper fingers, and the rings, and the
lace, an-l a certain way of carrying her
arms. Frohesome. as was proved by
her sitting down to play with only her
arms visible: unnuarried. from the ab
sence of a wedding ring.
"Who could .he be? Why was she
brought to the hospital? What is her
story? Why did she die so young?
Above all, how could she, at her early
age, have acquired such a knowledge
of whist? It is very rare to find a girl
playing whist even decently. Perhaps,
after-after leaving the hospital." he
added, with some d'-iicaey of experi
ence. she may have found opportuni
ties for practice.
"As for her companion, he was corn
paratively uninterestine. He had
chalked stones on his fingers. and he
was only a mediocre player. He neg
lected his partner's lead, he bottled her
trumps, and once he threw away the
king of trumps, not even trying to save
It by an obvious finesse. But the
lady-the lady-she, indeed, was di
vine."-Walter Besant in Philadelphia
Times.
was.rs Witheou Wasg.
In a much frequented down town
restaurant the waiters are paid no
wages at all, though they are well sate
isfied to retain their situations.
They depend for their remuneration
not only upon the fees given them by
the restaurants patrons. but also upon
s 6 per cent. commisoion on all the
thee's turned in and credited to them.
For example, if you order a meal
moating one dollar and give the waiter
s dime, he gets besides, six cents credit
on your check, or sixteen cents In all.
Effcient waiters have their regular
patrons, and as their tables are almost
always taken they often make from
three to four dollars a day.-New York
Herald.
Sew Jsw osm Carn as as Psbefemg*bs*
Jay Gmald b ahard mah o get sab
photopmaphis stad It FeobhIy Y
semase he ham' tr ies how I
ma pat a good portrais t dhm wag
Lanugh a Mmled. Mr Selam hed
peneas ghe t t- 6ted a pho.
- d h. mnd had, t' mad
hi salam hel i lto h fia shg
WOa Wm* h aew a . h
tr, as aqe me.e as
- my ae i -g.Isa
pgl bws Ia t b3ae e aqmi
ase a st ear as hea hesamnse n y
mat ads ..eye tmes ardm matke
- hee aes hasem hem dr
gag to a time wts a0 huk er
mad mls advanced to ses a psn ?at
I coau no+ t tp, p.r oan's pl e it
he dohig worn was whe a fd a
al ba I explained to Ib. Ge-41d
should wear a black coat, and one of a
little heavier material. He looked
about the room in a nervous sort of
way, glancing at his friend, and then
in a low voice said to me: "I am afraid
I haven't time to change my coat. If
you wish to make a picture of me you
had better do it now, and take inm as I
am."-A. Bogardus in Ladies' Howe
Journal.
The Prses .a Publil Mem.
Is the pres immaculate 1 By no
means. Do all connected with It ap
preeiate the grave responsiblities which
their limitlhs. facilities for reaching the
public should impose upon them?
Again the answer must be an emphatic
no. Have public men no reasonable
grounds of complaint? Undoubtedly
they have. But the sweeping judg
ment which too many of them pacs
upon the representatives of the press as
a body has in it the same elements of
unfairness and injustice as e'ist in the
wide opinion that public men as a celas
rare corrupt. With the latter the exact
opposite is true. As a cla.s. they are
h 'nest. So with jourialist': as a class
they are careful arI consceitions.
The err neous jliriertints if pul'e
nen and of uiemtibhrs of the press -ri!.:
fri III th* .iutt i a'u-."- auam i ., ;,it
thi, shiorte ,inui.. t . thi. few ips it the
toatv. In the ri,-" the fLat t. :t
pa'ty hitie. as a rt, ine to sh;a 1
1i je uiitect t Iain t : ,t - * * o I
Ir. i rnion that tat .. - rrml r
in the . th .r" t ! t tit t t h " r ,
i t i . ut e ti t : n I'. t I
of I"1 lint r .
e grives istli- t" ul a tr
their t., pit, . r I v .
t,. -t etO e l, th i ii -i
,f It o f- ' . ta t itia? r I < . r
to 1.. i' - ' ' t h : 1 .
-!t h p It . .: . t r. r
r t " I Fti. - r i.., u... t
cedila t "."t it 1 thir n t r I "f . r
tairrot . t i.t. r.a.lr I'..I. a I . t alt
to te ltit!ite a h r-.o ' tit I i fa rnI rih v
le.,n I' ph,.v' I 1n ,Ir",t 0~.~ :t ..
wabu ,n. ' t t1a* .ror I t ti; . 1' ai"" i i
ial_ t ir e h -i.a ,I sa tie, ;ia tb,.r- t rr.i-''t~
It uat this-tatrl al rie at utra it t
indt i ,awlh went to the tii th ithil.I
nhia ""rpvps1"ii w.thin Wi tot horn.
Invr torepn wIti' re tLu ppMi- Iltteki
to the horse, a r id, i a :n" l i. I h..
built at tghn, reolr to tit-e t.l .y awnt up
thi th. aIn tat wa. to t t-y :.t I ti:
api,.ar btwhii e!5'ii. pa->U" ,:.r I rote:-.
It mahi e the s tart all ri.;tt . . l ut it tsen
quirtsr pn. t. sn tr. -esak. t-t wratea I
tninitr bleti his orn aol tn. faithfol
-east. supposing there was uni1: ti 4.L
liver, stoppedl stiock ratI. MEi- Hiu.kin,?
barn was furious, arol with itf*-w well di
reeted kicks succeeh-d in getting him
ofr again, only to be stopped by another
blast. In that way they went up the
incline a step at a tune, like Mary Queen
of Scuts going to execution in mnelt'
drama. The miner escaped."-Atlanta
Constitution.
A Qneer Place fr Ears..
On the tibia of grasshoppers and
crickets' forelegs mniy be seen a hriaht
shiny 'pot. oval in form. whieh has
been fouiil to he it true (-: .r Old
naturalists"uppo{sed these strange itruc
tures helpel in owls stay to int. nsify
the penetrating. chirping sounds of
crickets. No one fur a moment thought
they ninght be ear
Sir John Lubbock and other modern
naturalists have decided that crickets.
bees, ants and other little animals shall
not keep their sense organs a secret
fronn us any longer; and although
these are often in the least suspected
places, still, by careful experinents,
they are sure to be discovered, as was
the cricket's ear. Some grasshoppers
have no ears in their legs, and as a rule
these cannot sing.-St. Nicholas.
A Fisaseter Himself New.
Life is grotesque. Seven years ago a
young merchant wore knickerbockers
and opened the door of a store for cus
tomers during the week from Christ
mas to New Year's. Last week he re
fused to accept in payment of a bill of
`500 a note signed by the proprietor of
the store where be was "buttons."
"He is worth $100.000. Your refus
lug to accept his paper may injure his
credit!" exclaimed involuntarily the
modest, obedient bookkeeper of the
young mercbant.
"And what do you suppoes I do it
fcrr the young mersbant asked with a
Vsed air.-New York Times.
wa.* i. a....rs. e.. asr
The bromedo is eapable d earsylag
two em hin bsek almoed as wel as on.
ill and di miate it skiesm it
weald seem as It the po 7 would give
w ader hi bee" hlodl but every
mmedu meb body toIee*gs mag'
door boma as power et t1- and
ama e. bl sha* weediwal.
inb..ndy lssofdoe . 4 pmy
whom & beery pties Iads. be
eaOle em east leakb bsee e ie
MW week -wdes b -sid
wame wamemsh as~s see aseth
ses-aew Toss BOea
'!h~ l -Tea at is hbea
of aps one
T. t-Weenyeas aeee
um IM.m..-w.* p. wV we
ter! as !**N***two
The International
Typewriter
A strictly fitrt-ela.** nu.climn.. Fully
warranted. lerde fr..w very bet ima
t'rial, by sktlled w'rknj.-i, and with
the bent tiol- lhmt have e y r tben de
vtwtt for to . urteae. Harrantm.-t #
do all thmT . ma. iae ream riably zttesi.-d
of t!.E vry t."r** tis .ewriter eestant.
C.I!.alae or writlne 1w0 word ler nuin
00--or nmore--ee'rding it, tie ability
of tih.-. mwrat..r.
Price - - - - $ioo.00.
If there is no agent in your towr
address the manufacturer..
THE PARISH MF'G..,.,
Agent. aasted IARIfH.NY.
FREE. TTPswaTI&o Fe.
First clans facilities nou beat of
teachers. Address, with stamp for re
Hurn ARIHH MF'G. Co.,
Parish. N. I
ThiCOLLGB i lIONTA.
FACULTY OF 13 PMOFESZ A11 TEKIlER.
Five IMeduct Departmnets, viz.
lb. Aeadin7 -The Calk" -?he fbooi of Milner
-71e (hemnaee ay oflre r amid fth
bunt, bn Dmum bM w thand scold water serice
hmugheu ~Both aes adaitted on equal tem,
a!1r wialeg.a ad labei.at applyi te
IRA .L1. JI.AIJ1.U .JWUW.erMeI
A
from a. At at rin
NEW FALL GOODS
Our entire Fall Purchases arrived
duricg the past two weeks and are
now conveniently arranged for the in
spection of our patrons.
The utmost care and attention has
been bestowed by us upon selecting
the very latest designs, patterns and
workmanship. We can justly say
that it is by far the most handscme
line of goods we ever attempted to
carry. Every departmert is replete
with novelties fDom the cheapest to the
finest manufactured.
We extend to all a cordial invita
tion to visit us at an early date, and
give us an opportunity to verify our
statement.
ORSCHEL & BRO.
The largest stock in Ouster County in
Clothinr.
Men's Fuzrniabhings,
Footwear
Ch1ildren's O1othini.
Hate
Truks. ~valises
G. W. SE YDE1'
L the Lemilas Asser.
119545 -FWMSO -I UWM~
The Largest, Best and ProD. LONs
BTEPH'EWU D. WDNG,~
Miles GityetMAR
Al ki n d of Fres and Mit M at cap i ec
hwan(.

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