OCR Interpretation


The Whitefish pilot. [volume] (Whitefish, Mont.) 1904-current, June 29, 1911, Image 1

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075089/1911-06-29/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

The
Whitefish Pilot.
VOLUME EIGHT.
WHITEFISH, FLATHEAD COUNTY, MONTANA, JUNE 39, 1911
No. 20
$1,330.00 In Prizes—Five Krause Pi
anos—to Be Distributed Among
Five Young Ladies.
THE WEST STMTS SMUT, JOLT 1,1911
THAT BEAUTIFUL KRAUSE PIANO ON EHXIBITION IN THE WIN
DOW OF THE SENAY MERCANTILE COMPANY IS TO BE GI
\ E\ AW A\ ABSOLUTELY WITHOUT COST TO THE YOUNG
LADY WHO SECURES THE GREATEST NUMBER OF YOTES IN
THIS CONTEST — NOMINATIONS ARE NOW IN ORDER
PLACE \OlR SELF OR FRIE XI) IX LIXE FOR THIS BEAUTI
FUL IXSTRUMEXT, AXD BOOST HER ALOXG. THE COXTEST
* IS OPEX TO EVERYOXE.
Going to give it away. You may
Jiink it a little bit strange and won
der how we can a.|ord to do it.but
such are the facts. That beauti
ful piano now in the display window
of the Senay Mercantile company
is going to be presented to some
young lady in this city or vicinity
absolutely without cost by the
Senay Mercantile company and the
Whitefish Pilot.
This is not all; there are five
pianos in the contest, all like this
one, and the prizes aggregate $1,
330, so four other ladies will have
chances to win pianos also.
These pianos are going to be
awarded to the lady who receives
the greatest number of votes in this
popularity contest. All that is ne
cessary is to place her name in
nomination. By digging in and
doing a little work on the start to
show her friends she is in earnest,
they will keep the ball a roll
ing for her. It's as easy as falling
off a log, and a valuable prize -like
this certainly is worth *ryinöiv „«r.
HOW TO GET VOTES.
The rules of the contest will be
found in another column. You will
find that they are not hard to ful
fil and once you get started and
the votes begin pouring in you will
find it both interesting and profit
able work. Your friends will all
be glad to help you in this. Tell
them to save the little coupons
which will appear in this paper each
week. They count 25 votes each.
Then again there are a great num
ber of new people in this city who
do not take the Pilot. If you go
to them and explain your position;
tell them that you are working for
the big piano prize, and they will
be glad to help you win it by sub
scribing for the Pilot. Every dol
lar that you get on new subscrip
tions will count 1500 votes for you.
There are also a number of people
that are delinquent on subscriptions.
They have just been putting the
-matter off from time to time, un
til they have become in arrears
and will be glad to turn this mon
ey over to you to help you gain
more votes. We will give 1000
votes for every dollar collected on
back subscriptions. A lot of our
old subscribers will pay a year in
advance to help you out. The sub
ripticn price to the Pilot is $2.00
per ytar. For one year paid in
advance we will give 2500 votes;
two years in advance 6000 votes,
three years in advance 10,000 votes
You will find that gathering sub
scriptions for the Pilot will be one
of the most pleasant occupations
you have had for some time. The
Pilot is conceeded by all to be the
newsiest little sheet in this coun
ty and by doing a little lively hust
ling you will be surprised the way
the votes will be piling up to your
sredlt.
AXOTHER WAY.
You can also secure votes by in
ducing your friends to trade with
the Senay Mercantile company. They
give votes with every cash pur
chase made at their store. Votes
will be issued to every purchaser,
no matter how small the amount,
at the rate of ten votes for every
cent expended. They have anoth
er method that will be a great vote
getter for you. They have mer
chandise coupon books which you
can place among your friends.
These will net you 1000 votes for
sverjr dollar you bring In to the
»tore, and when your friends trade
hese coupons out they will also
ie given votes at the rate of 1000
| on each dollar expended, thereby
doubling your votes. Your friends
will also be entitled to a five per
cent discount on all goods or mer
chandise purchased at the store
with these coupons. Your friends
will all be glad to help you win this
prize and will do everything possible
to help you after you make them
acquainted with the conditions of
the contest.
WILL GIYE YOU IXTSRUCTIOXS
When a candidate's name is put
in nomination and there is anything
about the contest that she «does not
understand, the contest manager at
the Senay Mercantile company, will
explain everything fully and lend
his personal aid in helping and in
structing candidates how to work.
Once a candidate grasps the idea
and gets In the ring, all her friends
will help her out and it will be an
easy matter to pick up votes here
and there every day.
THERE ARE FOUR WAYS.
Remember vot^'^re obtained in
four ways; first by clipping and
sending in the ballots that will ap
pear in the Pilot each week, which
will count for 25 votes; secondly by
trading at the Senay Mercantile Co.,
thirdly by securing subscriptions to
the Pilot; fourth by turning In mon
ey on back subscriptions to the Pi
lot, and on back accounts to the
Senay Mercantile company's store.
THE BALLOT BOX.
The ballot box is located at the-'
Senay Mercantile company's store,
and will be opened Saturday morn
ing. It is a strong wooden box, se
curely locked, and the keyhole of
the lock sealed up. The only ones
who will have access to the ballot
box will be a committee of three,
who will be appointed by the con
test manager in the next few days
It will be their duty to inspect the
ballot box every Wednesday at four
o'clock and count the ballots, and
keep track of the votes through
out the contest. They will be disin
terested parties, and will see that all
candidates receive a square deal.
Every Thursday the standing of the
candidates will be published in this
paper.
ALREADY STARTING.
Tuesday morning the bills were dis
tributed around town,announcing the
contest, and many of the nomination
blanks on these bills have been
turned in to the contest manager.en
-oring quite a number of young la
dies in the contest. Each one of
them is started off with a thousand
j

j
.■otes. You will find a similar cou
_ i
pon on the second page of til
per in the big ad, which you can use
in nominating yourself or a friend.
Don't be a bit bashful about starting
this contest. It is open to all and
everyone will have an equal chance
to win the prize.
NAME YOUR CANDIDATE.
Right now is the time to name
your candidate for popularity hon
ors, and incidently put her name in
line for a standard Krause piano.Ab
solutely no cost to either yourself or
the young lady you nominate. The
coupon appearing elsewhere in this
issue will put the lady of your
choice in lino with 1,000 votes to
her credit. Suppose you do it now?
BOOST HER ALONG.
There are a great number of young
ladies in Whitefish and vicinity pos
ting exceptional musical ability,
and must remain undeveloped be
cause they lack a good piano. Don't
this give you an idea ? You can put
some friend of yours in line by writ
ing her name on the coupon and
I
|
j
NEW SPRIXKLIXG ORDIXAXCE
REGULATES THE HOURS
OF SPRIXKLIXG.
At the council meeting Friday
evening the council passed an or
dinance which will effect every wa
ter user in the city who has a
lawn permit, and with which he
should become thoroughly acquaint
ed. Ignorance of the law is no ex
cuse, and if it is not lived up to he
may have a penalty to pay in the
nature of a fine.
The ordinance specifics that
the hours for sprinkling a lawn
or garden, with a lawn sprinkler,
or otherwise, shall be between the
hours of six and nine in the morn
ing, and between five and eight in
the afternoon. Between these
hours during the day one may
sprinkle as much as he likes with
a garden hose, provided he holds
the nozzle in his hand. He will
not be permitted to lay it down
and let the water run to waste as
has been done by many heretofore.
After eight o'clock in the even
ing until six o'clock the next morn
ing one will not be permitted to
use the water for any sprinkling
whatsoever. This new ordinance
will be strictly observed by
the water department and every
violator will be punished according
to the penalty attached to the or
dinance.
L. H. Lyford, of the Traveling
Mens Land-Investment company ar
rived last evening from Manley, la.,
with his famiy. He has shipped his
household goods and will make this
his home now while assisting Mr.
Shepard to look after the Interests
of the company.
POLL TAX ERROXEOUSLY DE
DUCTED BY G. X. IS CAUSE
FOR COMPLAIXT.
The city council held an adjourn
ed meeting Friday night to clean
up unfinished business.
Alderman Johns, chairman of the
street and alley committee, reported
that he and other members of the
committee had investigated the
grading of Woodlawn Place at Lake
side, but found that at the present
time it would not warrant the ex
pense, and recommended instead j
that tlie road at the fool of the j
hill, along the right-of-way be put
in shape. He was instructed to con-j
fer with aldermen from the First ;
ward and decide what would serve j
the best purpose.
The Riverside Improvement com-!
paiiy put a proposition before the i
council to furnish them with city i
water in their addition lying to the \
south of the city. They will go to j
ill the expense for the water pipe,
the laying of the mains and covecin
the same. Tlie mains to be laid |
according to the standard adopted 1
J tbo ant * UlU ' er the supervis- |
ion of the water commissioner, and ,
to be under tlie supervis
ion of the city at all times,
The people using the water in this
addition to pay the regular water
rental of $1.50 per month, the same
as they are now doing, and the city
to collect the same, refunding to
the company 50 cents fer each wa
ter user per month for the use of
the mains. The matter was re
(Continued on page 5.)
mailing it to the contest manager,
and you can keep her in line by clip
ping the coupons that will appear In
every issue of the Pilot. Watch
for them and get your friends to do
likewise.
CAX NOT ENTER.
No one employed at either the
Senay Mercantile company or the
Pilot, or anyone connected therewith
in any manner will be allowed to
enter this contest. Votes that have
already been cast will not be trans
ferable to another candidate.
MAX IS STRUCK BY FREGIHT
TRAIX AXD HURLED TO
DEATH
At seven o'clock last Thursday
eveuing a freight train, extra east.
No. 1146, Engineer W. A. Prowse
Conductor Earl Warren iu
charge, struck and killed an un
known man between switches at Lup
fer. The man was walking towards
the approaching train on the ends of
the ties, reading a pamphlet adver
tising the Flathead valley, and was
apparently so absorbed that he did
not notice the oncoming train. When
he did look up the train was nearly
upon him and probably became be
wildered, because instead of stepping
off to one side, he jumped into the
center of the track in time to be
hit by the locomotive and hurled
to his death.
The body was left in charge of
the section foreman at Lupfer, and
Coroner Waggener was notified,who
upon arrival took it to Kalispell for
burial.
The dead man is over fifty years
of age,and poorly dressed, apparent
ly being a typical hobo. He had no
money or watch with him, carrying
only a can of salt and a quilt. He
had nothing in his pockets to iden
tify him except a couple of note
books, bearing the name of Jos. H.
Callahan, Lowell, Mass. In one
was written (he names of a number
of men and firms, included in which
were several from Eureka, and W
A.Powers,andtlie 2 Miracle Concrete
Corporation of Kalispell.
In it was a list of railroad sta
tions and switches, extending from
Vancouver, Wash., on east, and the
stations were checked off as he
passed them. The distances between
them were correctly given in miles
and tenths of miles. He also was
carrying several booster phamplets
from western towns and communi
ties.
Deputy Sheriff John Metcalf was
in the city Monday attending to bus
iness in connection with his office.
SOME EXCEPTIOX ALLY GOOD
SCORES MADE BY LOCAL
MARKSMEX.
The Whitefish Rifle club held
its first regular shoot Friday after
noon oil its new rifle range a half
mile west of the city. It was open
to every one and any class of rifle.
The range was 200 yards at a Na
tional Rifle Association target. B.
E. Gibson made the highest average
using a .303 Savage rifle. E. P.
Christenson, a marksman from the
Kalispell militia, made tile second
highest average with an army Spring
field rifle, but made the greatest
number of points, 23 out of a possi
ble 25, in five shots,
When the shoot was about half
;o\er the storm which had been
threatening broke out in its fury an
drove all the marksmen to seek
shelter wherever they could. They
had quite an exciting time getting
out of the woods, dodging the falling
trees which tlie storm was blowing
down.
The following is a list of those
who took part in the shooting, and
the make of gun that was used: J.
D. Perdue, R. c. Purdy, A. F.Lutter
Chester Conlin and Pete Gutensohn
used an automatic R -mington; IL E.
Gibson, J. W. Poggi and R. K.Gran
tier use a Savage;C.H. Brawley and
B. F. Graves used a Winchester,and
E. P. Christenson an army Spring
THE SCORE.
J. D. Perdue.. 19
R. C. Purdy..17
B. E. Gibson. . 18
C. H.Brawley. . 17
E. P.Christenson,17
J. W. Poggi.. 18
A. F. Lutter. .13
P. Gutensohn. . 6
C. Conlin . . 19
B. F. Graves. .
R.K.Grantier. .
J. W. Maddy. .
15
The next regular shoot of the
rifle club will be on Thursday af
ternoon, July 13.
A XEW ROAD TO TALLY LAKE WILL PLACE THIS CITY IX DI
RECT AXD SHORT COMMUXICATIOX WITH A LARGE SCOPE
OF FIXE AGRICULTURAL LAXD THAT XOW HAS XO OUT
LET TO MARKET FOR ITS PRODUCE—SETTLERS WISH TO
EXLIST THE AID OF WHITEFISH.
Alton T. Crossley, one of the j
ranchers in the Stillwater country, |
was in the city Friday with a road
petition which he was circulating ;
among the Whitefish people to j
show what the people out in that j
Purt of the valley are doing
get roads^ to Whitefish, and mod- j
estly invited those here who could ;
elp the matter along to do what !
they couid towards it. !
The road that Mr. Crossley is in-;
terested in is not the road that is ;
now being built from here to Twin j
Bridges, but is another road run
ning from Twin bridges to Tally
lake. From Twin Bridges to Tal
ly lake by the present road is 13
miles By building the short cut |
that is contemplated the distance
will be only four and one-half
miles, which will be a big saving
and warrant the work being done
a8 .7" aS P °f ble '
All the settlers along the road
are very inthusiastic about it and
aave signed up to donate from a
week, to two weeks of work on
the road. The forestry department
has also donated $150 to build a
bridge across the stream that flows
cm o, Ta,ly lake. A
Whitefish merchants have put,
their names down on the list for
PUYED 10
D
HOME-TALEXT PLAY PLEASES A
LARGE AUDIENCE IX
OPERA HOUSE.
'The Honor of a Cowboy," given
last Thursday evening under the
auspices of the Ladies' Altar Socie
ty, was witnessed by a crowded
aouse, and more would have been
present if it had not been such an
extremely warm evening.
The play was well rendered in
suite of all the difficulties that
Mr. Rieman the director, had in
getting characters, and he is de
serving of a great deal of credit
for his diligent work. It took sev
êut c «-r characters to sta.;> the play
■ nd it was rather difficult to act
out pr-ierly on account of me oLa-e
being too small tu g ,t the proper
action.
Win. Riemann took the leading
part, which was a difficult one, as
lie had to play two parts. Mrs.
Harry Coulton was the leading lady,
and made a typical cow-girl. Miss
Lucile Prescott assumed the role of
a New York society lady, a real
rani
too, but she couldn't resist
the temptation to fall in love with
Judge Buckley, which part was tu
ken by John Lindhe.
Harry Cculton made a good look
ing sheriff, always quiek with the
trigger, but his wild spirit was also
tamed by a feminine creature, the
school ma'am, which was played
by Miss Elsie West.
Tom Sawyer, with his natty lit
tle Scotch brogue, which is not put
on at all, played the part of Mis
souri Smith and held importan po
sitions during the greater part of
his life at Coram, Halfmoon and
Vista. Smith and Scar Face the
Indian, which part was taken by
Ray Kraemer, both had about an
equal thirst for whiskey, and they
injected considerable merriment in
to the play at opportune times.
E. P. Ripley, B. S. Young, Harry
Lindsay, John Barry, Fred Bruns,
Fred Van Dyke and H. Penkake
played the parts of cowboys and
acted as assistants to the sheriff.,
Arrayed with big chaps, revolvers
(Continued on page 5.)
varying amounts and when they
all learn what this road means to
this city more of them will be com
ing through.
The ranchers out there have
made the offer that if the White
tofish people will furnish the "grub'*
while they are working, they will
do all the work necessary to make
a good road. It looks like a very
liberal offer and if the people
here subscribed a certain amount,
a hundred dollars is thought to
be plenty, we can have a good road
by fall that will tap a large
.nd
Very few people here have any
conception of the scope of country
lying 'ln"tWs' valley. Mr. Crossley
says that just west of Tally luk~
there are about two thousand acres
of fine meadow land that now c an
not find an out let to market Here
we have been shipping in hay from
Browning and other eastern ' point*
when it might be bought at home
if the facilities are made for getting
it into the city.
This road is one of the most im
portant projects now under way lor
tue upbuilding of cur city and i
„ ltoped th '
wl.at aid he can towards carrying
out the plans.
STATE HEIR
FINDS THAT PASSENGER BOATS
ARE NOT IX COMPLIANCE
WITH LAW.
Capt. N. A. Palmer, of Poison,
who has been appointed State In
spector of navigation, which office
was created by an act of the leg
islative assembly in its last session,
was in the city Saturday getting ac
quainted with boat conditions on
this lake. On account of the rainy
weather that day he was not able
to get around as much as h e
would have liked, and did not get
a chance to see all the boat own
ers who make a practice of carry
ing passengers, but will be back
again in about ten days,
He states that he finds a great.
number of boats here carrying pas
sengers, which are not in compliance
with the law, which requires that
boats must be inspect, l by the
state inspector, must be properly
(equipped in case of accident, have
a licensed pilot and be provided
with proper signal lights at night
and have a whistle. Those who
con Hnue to run without complying
with these provisions will be dealt
with according to the penalties as
prescribed in the law. This does
not apply to private boats; only
such boats as carry passengers.
It is required that everyone who
makes a business of carrying pas
sengers must apply to the state in
spector to have their boats inspec
ted. Captian \Y. F. Steward is
the only one who has made appli
cation so far, and is fitting up all
his boats according to the require
ments of the law. t
Captain Palmer makes his head
quarters at Poison, where anyone
wishing to get farther information
may reach him. From here he
went to Lake McDonald to inspect
the boats on that lake.
enlarging capacity.
L. J. Daigle, the local blacksmith,,
has just installed in his shop an
electric forge fan which will en
able him to increase his capacity
for work. He is also fixing up to
put in another forge P

xml | txt