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The Whitefish pilot. [volume] (Whitefish, Mont.) 1904-current, June 29, 1911, Image 6

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THE WHITEFISH PILOT
cm
F. K. TALLMAN mm H. C. ANDERSON,
Publish >rs
iHE OFFICIAL PAPER OF THE TOWN
OF WHITEFISH.
erBSCKIFTlOK .iatks:
Qr>e ¥ p»p.................................
Six mimtlis......................... 1.U0
Titlet 1 months .............................50
Siusjlf copies ................................ 5c
<iuitttiliau Subscriptions, 50c , er year extra
Subscription outsble of Flathead county
-payable strictly in advance.
in K Ut head county subscription is payable
at any time within the year. As in >st people
in the county whotake the paper do not like
to have their subscription interrupted, a
.pur'» time is given in which to pay for it.
at s l the paper does not stop wbou subscrip
tion expires unless so ordered.
if you are receiving a cup) of the paper
regularly, you will be expected to pay for it.
biri i forget this if subscription is not
{»ait! at tbe expiration of a year's time, you
wtti receive notice. 1Ï you « ish your paper
■»»tptx'd when youi subscription expires.
kiiMÜy notify this othce,
There are no deadheads on The Pilot's list,
«in: we want none, so if you do not expect to
|wt* h»r tue paper please take the trouble to
*m»w it stopped before you get in debt to us
»■ai we become the victim of misplaced cou
fidcisv.
AUVBKTISINU BATES:
JHsj>iay—20c per single column inch per
melt. Standing ads. 75c per single column
«iwh per mouth.
Reading Notices— 10c per line pel week.
Want Ads— le per woid.
PUBLISHED Et ERY THURSDAY.
Entered as second class matter
February IS, 1904, at the postoffice
at 'Whitefish, Mont., under the act
of Congress ef March 3, 1S79.
OUR CITY.
Whitefish, Mont., situated at the
hcbj of the great Flathead valley,
I.:2o miles west of Spokane and 2 75
miles east of Spokane. It is one of
the main division points on the
Great Northern railroad. Pay roll
runs from $100,000 to $150,000 per
month. The city has a population
of 2,000, and is located at the foot
of Whitefish lake on the Whitefish
river. Whitefish lake is a body of
water seven miles long and from one
to two miles wide, lying hemmed in
between the mountains. In seven
years this city has grown from a
forest wilderness to have a popula
tion of 2,000 people, and all modern
conveniences are now to be had.
Modern brick blocks, city water,
electric lights, telephone, and a
s;; litary sewer system is now being
built. The climate is ideal at all
times of the year, plenty of rainfall,
no irrigation necessary. Soil is rich
and where put under cultivation will
grow anything. Adapted for fruit
growing, which will be cue of the
coming crops. Many new orchards
Î* in S planted. Logged over land
iu tais vicinity is being cleared off
atäd divided into acreage tracts. Ex
cellent opportunities for the person
wug wants to build up a home.
Grund openings for truck farmers
and poultry raisers. Two sawmills
in the city, good schools, three
churches, two theatres and two halls
Whitefish lake is an ideal place for
a summer resort. Good hunting,
fishing and boating.
Large fleet of j
motor boats and launches. Good |
ÄÄWÄ t XC ,, SiS?
■»'iE! tap fine agricultural lands.
THE STILLWATER ROAD.
The majority of the people here
probably do not realize the import
une-' to this city the new Stillwa
ter road will be. Only a very few
have been out in that part of the
country and beheld the large tracts
of agricultural and timber lands that
lie tributary. Most people do not
know that this section of the coun
try is all settled up with hon^ested
ers, who for years have been wend
ing their way to Kalispell when
they wanted to do any business, a
distance of from 18 to 25 miles.wlien
it is only one-quarter as far to this
city.
This road will open up some of the
finest agricultural land in the val
ley. Over on the other side of
Tally lake is what is known as Big
Meadows, several thousand acres of
fine hay land. One does not have to
do much figuring to see what a good
road out to that district will mean.
After the road is built, so that
the country can be exploited by the
fccnieseeker, it will mean an in
crease in the number of settlers,
utd that will mean a larger market
for Whitefish merchants who can ex
change for the products of the far
mer, for which there is such a great
demand here.
It should be to the interest of
•very merchant and citizen to boost
Ibis road along as much a 3 possible,
and lend whatever aid they can to
get it completed at an early a date
as possible.
Just five more days to that glor
ious Fourth of July. Guess we will
have to help our friends cele
brate this year; then next year we
'WÖI invite them, over here.
a
of
a
as
of
we
fill
er
the
your
not
sis
can't
can.
man
where
a
Lakeside residents and people on
tile north side are looking around
for some way to get an open way
to the city, across the railroad yards
Some suggest a bridge, others a
tunnel and something has been said
about opening up a street. When
the matter is taken up with the
railroad company they will probab
ly suggest using flying machines.
There is quite a contrast in the
Flathead this year to what it was
last. A year ago now, and we were
all out fighting forest fires to save
ourselves from going up iu smoke.
A forest fire would have an awful
time doing business this year.
Nobody cares anything about the
lawn sprinkling ordinance these
days. The water commissioner only
smiles. It relieves him of a lot of
worry when it rains.
Yes, Whitefish is going to have
a sane Foui<i. Everything is go
ing to be quiet and serene. It will
be everyone to the woods, Kal
ispell or Columbia Falls.
No heat prostration^ in the Flat
head valley. It must be terrible to
have to sizzle a5vay in that oppres
sive heat in the east.
This city will be a center of ac
tivity in a few more weeks, when
we get to putting in the sewers and
the cement sidewalks.
That rain is just the way the
doctor ordered it. Now just watch
things grow.
The next thing we will hear is
someone hollering to have the rain
shut off.
Are you among the progressive
ones, lining up to make our city
a better one?
Don't fail to nominate your lady
friend for the piano contest.
O. what terrible mud!
have to pave our streets.
We will
Look out,
ing now.
the Milwaukee is com
PEOPLE
WED IN
The home of Mr. and Mrs. W. A.
Patterson was the scene, Wednes
day noon, of a beautiful appointed
double wedding, when their daugth
er Miss Minnie Louisa became the
bride of Fred G. Hagist, and Miss
Lulu Edyth, became the bride of
Joseph L. Lichty. It was a delight
ful idea on the part of the sisters
to have their weddings on the same
beautiful June day.
The young ladies are well-known,
having lived and grown to woman
hood in LuVerne. They are pos
sessed of many womanly graces and
virtues which endear them to their
, ! , . d * "* 'S" ->»
fit them for the offices of wife,
companion and housekeeper. They
are both graduates of our high
school, attended college at Cedar
Falls and Storm Lake, and for
a number of years have been among
our best teachers. Minnie having
taught in Whitefish and Great Falls,
Mont., and has just closed a success
ful school year at Marshalltown.
Joseph L. Lichty is also well
known in this locality, having grown
from childhood to man's estate in
this vicinity. He is a young man
of many sterling qualities. He is
a partner with J. E. Ross in one of
our popular stores and enjoys the
confidence and esteem cf many
iriends. Mr. Hagist is not so well
known here, his home being in
Montana. He has been in the em
ploy of the Great Northern R. R
as locomotive engineer for eight
years. His face is the very index
of integrity and true manhood and
we believe him well suited to ful
fill the new duties he has assumed.
The bridal party boarded the
evening train for Chicago and oth
er points in the east. They will
return to LuVern and after a
brief stay, Mr. and Mrs. Hagist will
leave for Rexford, Mont., where
the groom has a new home
furnished awaiting his bride.— Des
Moines Valley News.
is
a
a
to
taking a chance many a |
back
] do
The Little Brother Again.
Modest Suitor—I am going to marry
your sister, Jimmy, but 1 know I am
not good enough for her.
Candid Little Brother—That's wbat
sis says, but ma's been telling her she
can't do any better.—Baltimore Ameri
can.
After
man wishes he could put
where he got it.
it
on
a
of
-fr - H - HK-H*
SEEN 81 THE |
PILOT il I
•H-H-fr-H-H. * 1-M - I - M -
PILOT WIN IMS
MirilEE M
he finds it is a most eeauti
FUL AND SUBSTAT1AL
INSTRUMENT.
to
is
Mr. Cavanaugh of the Senay Mer
cantile company, called the Pilot
Man over Monday morning to see
the prize piano which had just ar
rived. It is certainly a beauty,and
the young ladies of this city will
have a prize put before them of
which the winner can well be proud,
it is now on display in the window
You can look it over yourself and
you will surely say that it is as
fine an instrument as you ever saw
Some industrious young lady in or
about this city is going to be pre
sented with this free of charge. It
will be taken out of the window
and set down in her home without
a cent of expense.
The case is of the style known
as ''Colonial, " the wood being
ourl walnut and the fall board has
a continuous hinge. The piano is
full seven and one-third octave; it
has full metal frame with over
strung metal wires in the bass, and
three string unison in the middle
and treble registers. It has three
pedals as follows: Pianoissimo or
soft, muffler and fortissimo or loud.
The piano has an elastic touch, su
perb carrying and sustaining quali
ties, the scale is drawn on what is
known as ''The American," which
has been adopted and is used by
all the first grade piano makers.
Since the contest has been an
nounced a number of young ladies
have entered. But then this con
test is not open to young ladies
only. The married women are go
ing to take a hand in it too. It
will make a lovely addition to any
one s home. Then again someone
might wish to get it for some so
ciety, or church, or the school. Its
up to the one who gets the most
votes to get the piano, and the con
testants will find this a very agree
able job. Call on the contest man
ager at the Senay Mercantile com
pany and he will explain to you how
to get votes and then the Pilot
Man will put his proposition before
you which will help you along some
more. Its a contest that is going
to stir up a lot of intliusiasm; it
is bound to from the amount of
prizes offered. Remember there
are five cf these prizes. You ought
to be able to land one of them.
IT.
THEY ARE DOING
The Pilot Man took a look
around last Sunday to see what
those Laaeside people have been
doing to their park that they have
been making such a fuss about late
ly. He can say that lie was sur
prised to find a big improvement
in tiie place. Tlie stumps are being
cleared out and the brush being
cut away which will give the grass
a chance to grow, and soon there
will be as fine a lawn there as in
anybody's front yard. They are
leaving all the young trees that are
growing here and there, and with
proper care and cultivation, in a
few years they will furnish plenty
of shade. '1 here are enough ol
them so that it will be unneces
sary to plant anymore. Of course
they are not laid out systematical
ly, they grow in little clusters, but
this will make it all the nicer and
after a time will make numerous
nice shady nooks that will be well
patronized on the warm summer
days. The park extends along the
high bank overlooking the lake.and
we are inclined to believe that it
is destined to become the popular
place for the young people in the
evenings. Keep posted on the
Lakeside park.
CAN HEAR IT GROW.
A. B. Swisher, a rancher living
a few miles southeast of the city
came to town Saturday with
a load of wood and dropped in
to chat with the Pilot Man a little
while, and to get out of the rain.
"Well, sir," he said, "This is cer
tainly great dope to make the crops
grow. I never saw things look as
good as they do now. You can bet
the farmers don't holler on this
rain. It is just the clear stuff, and
with the good soaking that we are
now getting there is plenty of mois
ture in the ground, so that if we
do not get any more rain we can
of
|
I
-
be assured of » bumper crop. Grain
in the valley is now nearly two
feet high and is beginning to head
out. It's great to go out into the
field after one of these'rains when
the sun breaks through the clouds
nice and warm. You can just
fairly hear things crack the way it
is growing."
GROWING SOME.
The Chamber of Commerce did
a grand thing two years ago when
they sowed clover seed on all the
vacant spots along the roads thru
out the city. We can see it now
coming up all over, and it is grow
ing line. The warm weather and
plenty of rain has worked wonders
iu transforming what used to be
almost a blackened waste, left by
forest fires, into a vertiable garden
spot. The grass is growing up pro
fusely all along the sidewalks and
the chances are that a call will soon
be made on the city council to run
a mowing machine through it to
cut it down. One won't be able
to look over it pretty soon.
BEAUTIES OF NATURE.
"Dad" TenEyeck has quite an
artistic temperment when it comes
to picking wild flowers and arrang
ing them in a boquet so as to dis
play their beauty to the best ef
fect. Most of us have not discov
ered that there are so many vari
eties, and such beautiful ones, too,
growing just outside our very door
step you might say. It takes
"Dad" to find them, and Sunday
morning he came in from the
woods with a huge boquet which
was the admiration of all who saw
it. He said he would get another
boquet next time he went out for
the Pilot Man to put on his desk,
so that the people could see what
they had growing wild in this city.
"Most people don't begin to realize
the beauties of nature we have
here," he said. Latter—The boquet
received and it was sure a dandy.
the FOLLOWING IS A SYNOPSIS
OF THE UNITED STATES
SUPREME COURT DE
CISION REGARDING
DELINQUENT SUB
SCRIBERS.
1. Subscribers who do not ex
press notice to the contray are con
sidered as wishing to renew their
subscriptions.
2. If subscribers order the dis
continuance of their periodicals the
publisher may continue to send un
til all arrears are paid.
3. If subscribers neglect or re
fuse to take their periodical from
the postoffice they are responsible
until after they have settled their
bills and ordered their paper discon
tinued.
4. If subscribers move to other
places without informing the pub
lisher, and papers are sent to for
mer addresses, the subscribers are
responsible.
5. The courts have decided that
refusing to take periodicals from
the office, or moving, or leaving
them uncalled for, is prima facia
evidence of intentional fraud.
6. If subscribers pay in advance
they are bound to give notice at
the end of the time if they do not
want to continue taking it, and the
subscribers will be responsible un
til an express notice with payment
of ail arrearages to the publisher.
KILL FLIES NOW!
The common house-fly is a car
rier of typhoid fever. This is the
season to get in the best work to
wards tlie extermination of the fly
pest. Every female will soon be
come the ancestor of several million
individuals, and by killing the an
cestor the decendants will never ap
pear.
Screen every door and window.
Shut them out.
Kill everyone that gets inside.
The War-cry is, " No Flies in
America in the next Generation."
START EARLY.
Candidates who have been nom
inated for the piano contest will
be furnished with special blanks and
schedule of votes, and instructions
by calling at this office. Get start
ed while the contest is young and
few are in the field. Candidates
will find that canvassing for sub
scriptions for the Pilot is a very
lucrative way of getting votes. Get
started early.
Sand at a Fire Extinguisher.
Why are palls of suud kept banging
In some buildings? It Is the usuul
thing to see banging in large buildings
—museums, factories, offices—rows of
pails containing n liquid which can be
used for extinguishing the flames in
case of fire. It is quite common now
adays to see also a pail of sand hang
ing with the others or In a place by
itself. This sand Is for use in case
of fire caused by an accident to the
electric wires, bringing about what is
known as "a short circuit." If water
were used it would spread the elec
tric current and probably increase the
damage, but sand, properly used, very
quickly extinguishes the flames.—Chris
tian Science Moultor.
Anyway the man in jail Is safe
from automobiles and grade cross
ings.
of
to
by
it
be
by
to
an
NOTICE FOB PUBLICATION.
Department of the Interior, U. S.
Land Office at Kalispell, Monta
na, May 17, 1911.
Notice is hereby given that Bur
ton E. Gibson, whose post-office ad
dress is Whitefish, Flathead Co
Montana, did, on the 26th day of
August, 1910, file in this office
Sworn Statement and Application
No. 02273, to purchase the W %
SE section 11, Township 31 N.
Range 22 W., Montana Meridian
and the timber thereon, under the
provisions of the act of June 3
1878, and acts amendatory, known
as the "Timber and Stone Law,"
such value as might be fixed by ap
praisement, and that, pursuant to
such application, the land and tim
ber thereon have been appraised, at
$270.00, the timber estimated 105,
000 board feet at $2.00 per M, and
the land $60.00; that, said appli
cant will offer final proof In sup
port of his application and sworn
statement on the 28th day of July
1911, before Register and Receiver
U. S. Land Office, at Kalispell, Mon
tana.
Any person is at liberty to pro
test this purchase before entry, or
Initiate a contest at any time be
fore patent issues, by filing a cor
roborated affidavit in this office, al
leging facts which would defeat the
entry.
Not coal land 1 .
ANDREW W. SWANKY,
Register.
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION.
Department of the Interior, United
States LandOffice at Kalispell, Mon
May 31, 1911.
Notice is hereby given that Alex
ander King, of Whitefish, Montana,
who, on August 10, 1905, made
Homestead entry No. 1769, Serial
No. 0546, for S!£ of NE *4. Section
29, Township 32 N., Range 22 W.,
Montana meridian, has filed notice
of intention to make Final five year
Proof, to establish claim to the
land above described, before Re
gister and receiver, at Kalispell,
Motana, on the 7th day of July,1911
Claimant names as witnesses: El
mer L. Geddes, Benjamin F. Che
vers, Charles LaBarr and Edward
Warner all of Whitefish, Montana.
ANDREW W. SWANE
Not Coal Land. Register
SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION
State of Montana, County of Flat
head, SS.
In Justice Court of Whitefish
Township. Before H. H. Garr, Jus
tice of the Peace.
J. J. Cremans & Co., Plaintiff,
versus Jack Gilligan, defendant.
The State of Montana to the abov
named defendant, greeting:
You are hereby summoned to ap
pear before me at my office in
Whitefish, in the County of Flat
head, on the 25th day of June, 1911
at 10 o'clock A. M., in an action
brought against you by said plaintif
to answer the complaint of the
above named plaintiff
The said action is brought to re
cover a judgment for the sum of
$22.75 for goods, wares and mer
chandise furnished you by the plain
tiff at your special instance and re
quest, and his cost of suit.
And you are hereby notified that
if you fail to appear and answer,
judgment will be taken against you
according to the complaint.
To the Sheriff or any constable of
said County, greeting: Make legal
service and due return thereof.
Given under my hand and seal thi
29th day of May, 1911.
H. H. GARR,
A Justice of the Peace of said
Township.
TWISTING THE TIGER'S TAIL.
Sheriff Ingraham pulled off a per
sonally conducted surprise party on
Essex parties last Friday night. A
store keeper by the name of J. M.
Culver has been in the habit of oc
cassionally indulging in a little pok
er game, with considerable stakes
on the table, and is credited with
having told about that he had fixed
it all up with the sheriff, so that
there was no danger of any arrest.
June 22nd was pay day on the
Great Northern, and Sheriff In
graham was returning from Deer
Lodge on Friday night. He wired
Deputy Sheriffs Clifford and Met
calf and a special agent of the
Great Northern to meet him at
Fielding. They then went over to
Essex after the train had been
gone for an hour and a half or so,
and found a game running full
blast, with about $125 on the table.
Culver was arrested and brought to
Kalispell this morning. This after
noon he pleaded guilty to the charge
of gambling, and was fined $150 by
Judge Erickson. The money found
on the table was also turned over
to the state.—Inter Lake.
of
gia,
as
you
You will not necessarily keep cool
by blowing in money.
S.
of
to
at
» M - M ■ : ! I * » M - I - I - H - I -
f NOWELL STUDIO.
. . good photograph, outaidtj
..work a specialty. All wor]
' * done in a prompt and satisfact
, . °ry manner. Also framed pie|
.. turcs for sale, and pictu
« * frames made to order.
** R. M. NOWELL,
. , Sue. to B. H.
|
|*|
E. L. GEDDESl
• •
The Real Estate Man
Notary Public
i: LYRIC THEATRE
; ; "THE HOME OF SILENT DRAMA" |
* * For an hour of solid pleas
.{. ure don't fail to visit
•j. Whitefish 's most pop
V ular house of
? _amusement
3,000 feet of Film projected
Nightly on the Famous Che
mo Crystal Curtain - -
5-Changes Weekly-5
SUNDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY,'
THURSDAY and SATURDAY
3-Shows Nightly-3
7:40 8:40 9:40
ADMISSION 10c
Independent Films Best of Music
"M"H
Flathead Poultry Fan
Pure Bred poultry Exclusively
7 Great Laying Breeds
23 Fine Breeding Pens
EGHARNS 1 ROSE conn buff
lluiiuimyj , bkow.n and white
MIN0RCAS ' SINGLE COMB BLACK
1UI1YUIVVA3 , kosE COMB BLACK
Barred Rocks—Indian Runner DucH
All K KK * S3 I>.r Silting. Buy «hum !
Home, B< -t them fre»|i unit liHtrliuhl.
anil Save High ICxpi-pg» Charge». Writ
for our free circular.
Elzie Tway, R F D. 1, Kalispell, Idont.1
*s* *i* , W < *ï**ï*4«H'»i*|
MARBLE and ORANITE
(Monuments.
MONUMENTS
of Barre, Scotch, Swede, Quincy and
Montello Granites, Yennont, Geor
gia, Italian, Colorado Yule and the
famous New York Marbles ON DIS
PLAY AT OUR PLANT. Don't buy
as sacred an article from photo when"
you can see and select the stone as
well as save the agents' commission.
KALISPELL MONUMENTAL CO.
Kalispell, Mont.
IKI IXthe COUGHl
anoCUREtwLUNOS
■MKIWS
KEWDiSCOVERY
TRIAL Bomi nui!
AMD ALL THROAT AND lUMfi TMURIK

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