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The Whitefish pilot. [volume] (Whitefish, Mont.) 1904-current, July 06, 1911, Image 1

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The
L
Whitefish Pilot*
VOLUME EIGHT.
WHITEFISH, FLATHEAD COUNTY, MONTANA, JULY 6, 1»11
11
No. 2T
LIBERAL USE
or in
GOINS PITCHES A NO HIT, NO
RUN GAME AGAINST
KALISPELL.
The game here between White
fish and Kalispell last Thursday
evening was one of the greatest
exhibitions of baseball ever seen
on any diamond in the valley. In
fact it is only on very rare occasions
that such playing is ever seen in
the big league games.
Archie Goins was in the box for
the locals, and Kalispell got the
cleanest beating they have ever had.
Kalispell didn't get a single safe hit
and was completely whitewashed;
only one man got to first base, and
that was on account of a slight er
ror made by McClintock, the catcher
who dropped the ball on the third
strike and could not recover it
quick enough to put his man out on
first base. This breaks all records
Archie has ever made. It is the
first time in his career that he has
ever pitched a no-hit, no-run game.
If it had been only a scrub team,so
much importance would not be at
tached to it, but the Kalispell team
is among the fastest semi-profession
als now playing ball, and Archie and
his team are deserving of a great
deal of credit.
He was supported admirably by
his whole staff; everyone of them
seeming to know right where to be
to get the ball, and it was impossi
ble for Kalispell to put a hit thru
the line, which seemed to be im
pregnable.
The only scores that were made
were made in the first inning.Skin
ner was the first man to bat, and
was hit by the pitcher which lot him
to first base. Barton made a nice
little sacrifice hit, getting out on
first, but advanced Skinner to sec
ond. Mackay came up and swatted
one over the left field fence, scor
ing Skinner and himgelf. JUazurie
got a safe hit, but was put out try
ing to steal second, and Goins was
caught out by the short stop, re
tiring the side. The rest of the in
nings resulted in goose eggs for
both sides.
Considerable enthusiasm was in
jected into the game by the band,
which turned out in full force and
rendered short spirited selections be
tween each inning. The band at a
ball game is a great drawing card.
FRIDAY'S GAME.
Friday's game was played right
after a heavy rain, find the diamond
was covered with a thick coating of
mud. Every little white during the
course of the game there was a cold
drizzle, which took the snap out of
the players, and they played in a
listless sort of way. In spite of
that there was a good turn-out to
see the game, but everything was
so cold and damp and wet and mud
dy that very little enthusiasm was
displayed, and many left without
waiting to see the finish.
Bottles was in the box for the
locals, but seemed to be playing
in hard luck. He was hit pretty
hard all through the game and was
touched up for one home run by
Trekel, who brought In three soores.
The final score was S to 0 ii favor
of Kalispell. A stranger by the
name of Stack umpired, tout
it was very unsatisfactory to the
fans, who did not hesitate in Set
ting him know what they thoughts
his "rotten" decisions.
TURN ABOUT.
In last Sunday's game Whiteösb
put it ail over Kalispell again to
the tune of 9 to 2. O'Niel pitched
for Whitefish against Raascb.
Raasch didn't have a thing that the
Whitefish boys could not get next
to and they just batted the horse
hide around at their pleasure.
Hetchkoe fattened his batting aver
age up pretty well by knocking two
home runs. One of them is said to
be the longest drive ever known to
go over the Kalispell fence.
Things were pretty much reversed
in the game on the Fourth. Goins
and Thompson, the two generate,
opposed each other, but somehow
Kalispell got next to Goins after
the fifth inning, and coupled with
a few errors Whitefish was de
feated by a score of 7 to 2. The
game was witnessed by the biggest
crowd that has ever seen these two
teams play.
Subscribe for the Pilot now.
a
FISH COMMISSIONERS ARE NOT
SATISFIED WITH SITE
SELECTED.
The location for the Flathead fish
hatchery, which caused such a fur
or here this spring, is again is the
limelight. The fish commissioners
have found it impractical to estab
lish the fish hatchery at the point
originally located, near Bigfork, and
they will have a representative in
the county in a few days to select
a new site. All persons interested
are requested to notify Mayor Bald
win at Kalispell of any sites which
they have to view.
If anyone in thte vicinity knows of
any springs that have not yet been
looked at, it would be well for
them to get busy at once and take
the matter up with Mr. Baldwin.
LIBBY WINS THE
COUNTY SEAT FIGHT
Helena, July 1.—The supreme
court on Saturday rendered a decis
ion on the rehearing of the contest
case for the county seatship of Lin
coln county, declaring Libby the
county seat and finally settling the
dispute. The contest had previously
been decided by the supreme court
in favor of Eureka, but the case
was recalled and reheard with the
result that Libby wins.
KILLED BY CAVE-IN
E. Sweeneyson, employed on the
drainage ditch near Montford, was
killed Saturday by a cave-in. He,
in company with another man, were
digging at the bottom of a ditch 22
feet deep, when .the tides crum
bled in. Sweeneyson was buried,and
the other man received a badly in
jured shoulder. The dead man had
no relatives that could be located.
HAS MOVED HERE
FROM KALISPELL
W. A. CrawfoTd, formerly with
the Kalispell Drug company, who
some weeks ago purchased an in
terest in the Public Drug company
with R. W. Larter, moved here on
July 1, and has taken charge of
the store. Mr. Crawford has moved
his family and household goods and
is located in the Wolcott cottage on
Third street and Spokane avenue.
GELE8IAIE1SIH TEAR
if HIS OHM
Rev. Father Van Aken was
tendered a very pleasant surprise
last Thursday evening by the mem
bers of his parish, it being the 15th
anniversary of his ordination. Rev.
Father Vermaat of Chinook,who was
visiting in the city, conducted ser
vices in the evening appropriate to
the occasion, after which Father
Van Aken was escorted by the
members of the Borromeo club and
the Knights of Columbus to the ban
quet hall, where the ladies had
spread a bountiful repast. D. P. j
Phelan acted as toastmaster and
was eloquently responded to by Fa
ther Vermaat and others present
In the course of this Father Van
Aken was presented with a well
filled purse, which was the con-:
tributions from all the churches in
his parish, namely, Libby, Eureka,
Jennings, Rexford, Whitefish and
Columbia Falls.
As Father Van Aken has been a
persistent worker during the time
he has been here and has not had
a vacation, it was suggested that a
vacation of ten days or two weeks
go with the purse which was raised
for the purpose of defraying ex
penses.
During the evening a proposition
was made to organize a sub-council
of the Knights of Columbus under
the Kalispell charter, there being
about twenty members in this city
from various councils. The ques
tion will be decided in the course
of the next two or three weeks.
Thirty-Five Young Ladies Have En
tered in the Contest and the Race
Promises to be Interesting.
m A SHORT wm TO ENTER
NEVER BEFORE HAS SO MUCH INTEREST BEEN STIRRED UP
OVER ANYTHING AS OVER THE PIANO CONTEST WHICH
WAS OPENED SATURDAY—CANDIDATES ARE NOW BEGIN
NING TO REALIZE THE VALUE OF THIS PRIZE, AND ABE
GOING TO MAKE A HARD RUN FOR IT—THE PIANO ON
DISPLAY HAS BEEN THE CENTER OF GREAT ATTRACTION
AND IS BEING VIEWED BY HUNDREDS OF INTERESTED
PEOPLE EACH DAY—MANY CAN HARDLY BELIEVE THAT
SUCH A VALUABLE PRIZE IS TO BE GIVEN AWAY AB
SOLUTELY* FREE, BUT IT IS GOING TO BE SET DOWN IN
SOME YOUNG LADY'S HOME AFTER THE CONTEST IS OVER
ABSOLUTELY YVITHOUT COST.
4
4
The big piano contest has started
off with a rush. The interest dis
played has reached far beyond our
expectations. Thirty-one young la
dies' names have been entered in
the contest. Of course a great
many of these have been nominated
without their knowledge, by friends,
and they may wish to drop out.Some
of them have pianos of their own
and would rather withdraw and help
their friends who are not so fortu
nate, so of course by next week we
expect to see the list simmered
down quite a bit. The race has
only started, and as it will last sev
eral weeks more, the outcome can
in no way yet be predicted.
Many surprises were sprung when
the votes were counted last night.
Voting was very brisk yesterday
afternoon, and several candidates
received some phenomenal boosts
by friends who had evidently been
working on the quiet. The race
has only begun, and some who are
around the bottom of the list are
likely to be seen soaring around the
top next week.
There is still an opportunity for
those who still wish to start. By
doing a little extra bustling they
can soon get up with those who
are in the lead. From the first vote
that was counted yesterday after
noon, it can readily be seen that
many of the candidates are receiv
ing good support. Those who have
the most votes to their credit, tho,
are the ones who started from the
beginning and have hustled all the
while.
EVERYBODY INTERETSED.
The names of the candidates that
I
i
;
STHG or I CANDIDATES
Mrs. Geo. H. Blume .. .. .. . . . .
Mrs. George Wood...... . . .
Mrs. Rose Weller......... . . .
Miss Maig Scott...........
Mrs. I. G. Sautar........ . . .
G. I. A. to B. of L. E........
Miss Lucilo Prescott.......
Mrs. Wilmer Wood.........
Mrs. Roy Martin...........
Royal Neighbors.........
Miss Alice Noble.........
M. E. Church.............
Miss Alma Nielson........
Mrs. H. H. Armstrong .. .. .
Miss Christine Cremans.......
Miss Bessie Von Gunten.......
Mrs. J. Martin...........
Mrs. P. L. Forcum.........
Miss Mary Smith...........
Miss C. Grubb •...........
Mrs. M. J. Chessman.........
Miss C. ^enn.............
Miss Louise Tetrault.......
Miss Bessie White, R. R. No. 2.
Miss Mary Hennessy.........
Miss Blanche Phipps.......
Miss Frances Depew.........
Miss Georgia Smith, R. R. No. 1.
Miss Elsie West..............
Miss Florence Flulatt.......
Miss Lillian Micho........
208,600
73,äin)
. 68,000
.62,125
.51,600
48,000
.45,000
.35,700
.31,025
.30,700
23,750
.17,500
. .7,200
. .4,500
. 4,000
. .1,400
. .1,100
. .1,11)0
. .1,050
. 1,025
. .1,000
. .1,000
. 1,000
. .1,000
. .1,000
. .1,000
. .1,000
. .1,000
. 1,000
. 1,000
. 1,000
were nominated were posted Satur
day morning in Senay's window,and
has been quite an attraction. Some
of the candidates started in to work
the minute they found they had bee
put in line, while others who live in
the outskirts of the city and have
not been in on account of the wet
weather have not yet learned that
they have been nominated, but will
be informed by this issue of the
Pilot. A few others are holding
back to see how they are going to
be supported. The number of votes
set opposite' YHelr naines will no
doubt show many that they have a
lot of loyal friends who are eagre
to see them win, so should start
out at once and begin hustling.
A VOTE GETTER.
Several of the candidates have
already applied at thte office for
subscription blanks and are making
a thorough canvas for new subscri
bers. They are also piling up votes
for themselves by turning in money
collected on Subscriptions in arrears.
During the past week we have sent
out notices to all our subscribers
who are at all in arrears, so that
they will know how they stand,and
if they desire to help any of the
I candidates win the piano they can
i pay up their subscription, and the
candidate they wish to favor will
be credited with the proper number
; of votes.
The candidates who have entered
the field are surprised and encour
aged by the way their friends are
helping them out. One candidate
in particular who has become a very
enthusiastic worker, has found it
(Continued on page 5.)
NiBI
TIME TOREGISTER
DON'T PUT IT OFF UNTIL YOU
FORGET ALL ABOUT
IT.
The new system of registration
adopted by the last Montana legis
lative assembly went into effect
Saturday, and hereafter ail voters
must register with the county clerk
and recorder, and not at different
registration precincts as was the
practice heretofore. The new sys
tem has an advantage over the for
mer system, in that all voters must
be registered, but once registered,
they need never register again, so
long as they continue to vote at
each election, and do not move from
the precinct in which they lived at
the time of registration. The reg
istration of voters will become a
part of the duties of the county
clerk and voters may register at
any time during the year, except 30
days before each election. The of
fice hours of the clerk are from 9
a. m. to 5 p. m. daily, Sundays and
legal holidays excepted.
Under the present system all per
sons residing within a radius of ten
miles from the county court house
must appear personally at the office
of the county clerk to register.Those
living outside this limit may appear
before a notary public or justice of
tbe peace and register by filing the
proper affidavit, which must then
be forwarded to the clerk to be en
tered in the "great register." Coun
ty registration will continue until
thirty days before the next election.
Within that time every voter who
wishes to vote at any election and
every woman qualified to vote at
any school election, must have their
names in the big book or lose their
vote. A voter need not register but
once so long as he continues his
residence in the same precinct or
the same county. If he moves or
faite to vote at any election his n<jm
will be canceled, and he must reg
ister again before he is allowed to
cast his ballot.
Judge H. H. Garr and Merle C.
Groene have been supplied with the
proper blanks for the registration.
There is no fee to register, but they
receive 25 cents for each name reg
istered, which is paid by the county.
So far there have been compara
tively few names registered, as it
is so new, and the book remains
open until thirty days before elec
tion. It is absolutély necessary to
register If one desires to vote, and
when one moves from one ward to
another it will be necessary to reg
ister again.
GIB CHU
«KOI«
The city council held its regular
monthly meeting Monday night to
transact the regular routine of busi
ness.
The treasurer reported a cash on
hand in the treasury of $4,484.56.
The police magistrate had collected
$191.50 in fines, and the water com
missioner $764.05 water rentals.
Chairman Johns of the street and
alley committee reported progress
on the work on Lupfer avenue, but
will not be able to finish the work
at Lakeside until he can see the
Great Northern officials and get the
old powder house moved, which now
stands right in the way.
Chairman Noble of the finance
committee reported the finance
committee had held a meeting and
had come to the conclusion that the
city could not furnish water to the
Riverside addition unless they came
into the corporation. Joseph Reed,
representing the Riverside Improve
ment company, was present, and
stated that they were ready to be
come a part of the city of Wbitefteh
at any time. The clerk was instruc
ted to attend to the legal work
necessary for them to become a part
of the corporation.
A number of ordinances were put
upon their first and second readings
and the clerk was instructed to
prepare the ordinance for standard
cement walks.
The meeting was then adjourned
to meet again Friday, July 9.
B
E
Eureka Wants Whitefish to get Busy
on an Automobile Road to Con-,
nect with Glacier Park Road and
Run West to Éureka and Inter
national Boundary.
WHITEFISH ROADS UNDER WAY
Road Work Now Being Done Will
Form Part of the Connecting
Link—Up to Eureka Now.
In another column of this paper
will be found «an article from the
Eureka Journal in which the editor
suggests that Whitefish get busy at
once and tie onto the Kalispell-Gla
cier park road, pointing out the ad
vantages that this would be to our
city on account of the travel that
would come this way, and it would
connect our beautiful lake with Lake
McDonald. He farther suggests that
the road be continued westward in
to *he Stillwater country where an
other chain of nature's gems glisten
and sparkle in the sunshine, and
from there Eureka will take care
of the situation and continue the
auto road, on to the Canadian
boundary, up Into Crew's Nest
country, thus putting Whitefish on
an international automobile road.
"Will Whitefish rise to this oppor
tunity that will give her national
distinction by placing her in the
doorway of the Glacier National
park," he asks. Will we? Just
watch our smoke, Mr.Journal man.
You probably are not aware that
for a month now a large crew of
men have been at work on a road
into the Stillwater country. Five
thousand dollars have been appropri
ated for the work and this, though
probably not sufficient to complete
the work thte fall will make a.
good road to Twin Bridges. An
other proposition is now on foot to
continue the road on to Tally lake.
Whitefish people have subscribed
liberally to the project, and the
ranchers living in that section have
signed up to donate from a week
to two weeks work each. The for
estry department has donated the
money for a bridge across a stream
that flows out of Tally lake, and
the lumber companies who have pro
perty on the Stillwater river have
signified their willingness to help
the work along. The promoters
feel very enthusiastic over the en
couragement they have received
from everyone they have ap
proached on the subject, and they
believe that inside of a couple of
weeks they will be able to start
grading.
This will make a total of tea
miles of road that is under way out.
of Whitefish on the west. Then on
the east there is a good road to
Columbia Falls with the exception
of a few places, and a thousand dol
lars has been appropriated to
straighten out some of the sharp
curves, and fill up in the muddy
places. This work is also under
way, and before the summer is over
this will make an excellent high
way for automobiles or any other
thing that runs on wheels or foot.
Until the road to Kalispell was
fixed up this spring, the popular
route for automobiles from the
county seat to this city was by the
way of Columbia Falls. The trip
has been made in forty-five minutes,
so that speaks pretty well for the
connection we have with the Gla
cier park highway on the east.
Besides the roads running out of
here both east and west of thi 3 city
we are connected to the county seat
with one of the best roads in the
county. Considerable money and
much work has been expended on
this highway this spring, and Com
missioner Good has made good his
promise to make a road that boy*
can play marbles on. The road
has been widened out all along, the
grade has been cut down wherever
necessary,and the soft spots in the
road have been fixed up, so that
automobiles can travel over it now
without the least inconvenience.
The road west to Twin Bridges
is going to make an excellent high
way when It gets finished also.
When the road was surveyed this
spring,Commissioner Good was right
on the scene all the time and saw to
(Continued on page 5.)

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