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The roundup record. [volume] (Roundup, Mont.) 1908-1929, January 05, 1912, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075094/1912-01-05/ed-1/seq-8/

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NO CONFESSIONS
SAYS COUNSEL
Harriman Declares it Will Be a Fight
To the Finish to Clear Labor
Leaders.
(Kecortl Special.)
1 .ok Angeles, Cal., Jan. 1.—'This
will ue a fight to a finish. 1 want all
workingmen to know that," delnred
Attorney Job Harriman, counsel for
Olaf Anton .Tohannsen and J. E. Mun
sey, the indicted labor leaders, today.
The statement was made after Harri
man's attention was called to a declar
tion by Federal officials that they ex-,
pected the latest dynamite conspiracy
cases to end as did the trial of James j
B. McNermara. ' There are no cofes
sions to be made this time, said liar-;
riinan, emphatically. .Tohannsen, who
was reported to have gone to San bra- ;
cisco to confer with his colleagues of
the building trades an dotlier labor
councils is still in the city, lie was
seen last night. According to plans
of the defendants, they will go into
Judge Wllborn's court tomorrow and
plead not guilty to the indictments
charging them with conspiracy to
transport dynamite in violation of the
interstate commerce laws and ask j
permission to nie a demurrer to the
indictment. Attorney Harriman said j
he would also represent Eugene A. i t
Clancy, former business agent of the j
Structural lorn Workers Union in San j 0
Francisco, who is ill in his home in ,i
his home in this city. Other Attorn- j
eys have been chosen to take oart in ; (
the defense but Harriman declines to j
name them at this time. :
CLANCY FILES BOND
U. S. Deputy Marshall Who Stood
Guard Over Sick Labor Leader
Is Releived.
San Francisco, Cal., Jan. 1. E. A. J
Clancy, the San Francisco labor lead- !
der indicted in Los Angles in connec
tion with the dynamiting conspiracy,
filed a surety company bond for $5,000
late yesterday evening and the Uniter
States deputy marshall who had stood
to
at the sick bed since last night took
his departure. The Bond assures the
appearance af Clancy in Los Angeles
hen his pros' re is desired, hut is is |,
beleived that h will
least before Clancy
r nough to he moved.
be a month at
will be well
CHINESE CALENDAR CHANGED
New Years Day Made to Correspond
With Most Other Countries
of the World.
j (Record Special)
Nankink, China, Jan. 2.—The first
official act of Dr. Sun Yat Sen, the
president of the new Chinese republic,
was to change the Chinese calendar,
He madeNewYears day the first of his
presidency, thus marking the com
mencement of a new era and making
the Chines year began henceforth on
the same day as in most other coun
tres of the world. Dr. Sun Yat Sen
took the oath of office today as pro
is
visional president of the republic of j
China and was formally invested with j
rhe powers of chief executive. The j
ceremony was simple but dignified. It
was attended by all the prominent
men of the revolutionary party. Dr, i
Sun, who is well known n America j
and Europe, after his arrival in Shang -1
hai some days ago, was elected presi
dent by the national asembly of re
f'Tin ers re present Li g the provinces of
C .mu proper then in session here by
an almost unanimous vote. President
Sun Yat S.cuY cabinet is as follows:
Vice President, Li Yuen Hang: Fin
ance Minister, Chin Chit Tao; Pre
mier and War Minister, Wang Chun
Wei: Marine Minister, Captain Wang:
Chiel of Staff, General Hsu.
SCHEME FOR SUPREME NAVY
London, Jan. 3.—The rumor is re
vived that Mr. Churchill was contem
plating a loan for the Navy of at least
$150,000,000. There is reason to be
lieve however that the amount of the
loan may be larger. Lord Chas. Ber- j
esford's scheme for a supreme Navy i
contemplated it may be recalled the
possibility of a considerable loan and
recently if report may be believed his
Lordship and Mr. Churchill have been
in consultation. The loan w r ill be of
course in addition to the usual esti- !
mates for the year. Its advantages j
»re regarded a. .wo fold bothjoral ]
and material. Another highly import-,
ant mater is the provision of adequate j
docks for Dreadnaughts and to this :
purpose a considerable portion of the !
loan will, it is presumed be alloted.
NEW CARDINAL LEAVES ROME.
Rome, Jan. 3.—Cardinal Farley of
New York bade adieu to the Eternal
City today, going to Neples where on
gntnr day he will embark on the
Bt e w m«hlp Berlin for New York. Car
dinal O'Connell of Boston wiU remain
in Italy until Jan. 17, whwen he will
board the steamehip Canopic at Nap
les and sail tor home.
•î*
FIGHTING BOB*' DIES.
_
( Record Special)
Washington, Jan.4.—Rear Admiral
R 0 ) )er t d. Evans, "Fighting Bob" to
an admiring nation, died late yester
da y afternoon at his home in this city,
Acute indigestion ended the career of

4* Washington, Jan. 3.—Rear +
•> Admiral Robert I). Evans re- ♦
•£• tired, died suddenly tonight of ♦
❖ acute indigestion. He had been ♦
•£• apparently in the best of ♦
❖ health up to the minute he ♦
4* was striken and expired before +
*> a physician could be sum- ♦
v rnoned. ♦
❖ ♦
-;-**** *****♦***** +
TO BE BURIED IN PLOT
CHOSEN BY HIMSELF.

+
one of the popular officers of the Na
vy. He was ill less than two hours.
The funeral services will occur at 2
o'clock tomorrow afternoon at All
Souls Unitarian Church here. The
pall bearers will be chosen from
iimong the Naval officers who have
served under admiral Evans. The
funeral cortege will be composed of
f 0ur companies of marines, two or
u iree companies of blue jackets from
the Washington Navy Yards one bat
t er y G f Artillery from the Washington
Xavy Yard and the entire battallion
0 f Midshipmen from the Naval Aca
,i e my at Annapolis. The interment will
fake place at the Arlington National
( emetary in a plot which the deceas
ed Admiral himself selected several
vf >nra a™
BIG PENSION FOR STUBBS.
San Francisco, Jan. 2.—John C.
Stubbs, director of traffic for the
Harriman lines, was today placed on
the pension roll of the Southern Pac
ific. He is No. 461 on the list and
will draw the largest pension of any
railroad pensioner in the world.
Stubb's salary for the last ten years
has been $36,000 a year. According
to the rules of the pension system
his allowance will be about forty-one
))er cent. 0 f i ds present compensation.
In addition he gets an extra alowance
because of an arrangement by which
|, e retired as consulting director
of
traffic, to be subject to calls for ad
vice, no matter where he may live or
travel. For this reason lie will be al
lowed enough more annually to bring
his income, inclusive of his pension,
up to $18,000 a year.
Just ahead of Stubbs on tlie pen
sion roll is George Cuthbert, a negro
employe of the Southern Pacific land
department, who is No. 460 on the
pension list. He has been in ».ie
ompany's employ for thirty-five years
!
and has not lost a dti) iti that time,
AEROPLANE TRIALS SUCCESS
Paris, Jan. 2.—The trial period of
the army aeroplanes is at an end. It
is a success and according to a state
ment made by Minister of War Mess
imy, the army air corps of France will
undergo a reorganization along prac
ticality and the new division will of
flcially take its place among its elders
whose busines is war.
------------ -------------------
«y 1 i f* eA A
WOWj DUX IIS VOIQ
m
sea
ms
we>re having( isn - t it , since the "Wea
vor winter his shroud has spun"?
V ........ "1
Rough Weather
! we're ready now
j sir?
Looks, from all accounts, as though
that forecasted blizzard is right on top
of us now-. Likely to last, too.
Wow, wow, but it's cold! ! ! Warm
up 'o us any old time, for the warm
est of Winterlest-wearables. Surely,
What'll yon have.
$1.50 to 3.00
] Woo.™ «Jd« ™™>?«ck e UW „ 7 .
Woolon Knit G i oves & Mitts 25c to 75c
35c to 50c
$1« to $32.50
$3.00 to $5.00
$2.50 to $5.00
50c to $8.00
50c to $1.50
j Cashmere Hosiery
: Huge Fur Coats
! Corduroy Trousers
** orm 008
Fur lined Caps
Knit Mufflers
Whent the Wintry winds do blow.
Would you lay out for a fur coat, say,
$20.00 for a black dogskin with rac
coon collar. $30.00 buys a brown calf
skin, blended muskrat collar.
FAD
Shoe & Clothing Co.
Post Office Next Door.
ODD FELLOWS' INSTALLATION
♦■New Officers for 1912 Installed With
: Impressive Ceremonies Last
Night.
Miracle Lodge I. O. O. F. had their
annual installation of officers at the
regular meeting last night, the impres
sive cermonies of that order being
gone thru with. The following are the
names of the officers installed:
Geo. Rottman, Noble Grand
A. Countryman, Vice Grand
Geo. E. Bowers, Secretary
Joseph Quissenberry, Treasurer
Following the installation an ela
borate banquet was served at Danils
Cafe.
WOODMEN ELECT OFFICERS
New Officers to Be Installed at Meet
ing Next Friday Evening.
At the regular meeting of the local
camp of Modern Woodmen of Amer
ca the following officers were elect
ed for the ensuing year:
Ole Skeie, Venerable Counsel
Hohn Hledik, Adviser
H. A. Seitzinger, Banker
Dr. Thurston, Clerk
L. L. McGibboney, Escort
Frank Hefford, Escort
Chas. Dozois, Sentry
The installation of the above offic
ers will take place at the meeting to
be held next Friday evening.
LABOR UNION ANNUAL ELECTION
j
1
Local No. 12,794 of the Amerisan
Federation Labor Union held its an
nual election of officers Wednesday
evening of last week, with the follow
ing results :
President, I. K. Tvedt; vice presi
dent, C. Stanton; secretary, W. H.
Morgan; treasurer, Jas. Cummings;
trustee (IS months), C. Stanton; trus
tee (12 months), J. Brown; trustee
(6 months), Alex. Adolph; represent
atives to central labor council, J.
Brown, W. H. Morgan and Jas. Cum
mings.
COLD WAVE.
Kansas City, Jan. 2.—Cold weaJier
records for the winter were broken in
many places in Iowa and Nebraska to
day, but in Kansas, Missouri, Oklnlio
ma and other points in the southwest.,
moderate weather with rising temper
atures was reported. At Norfolk,
Neb., 16 degrees below zero was reg.s
tered. Other temperatures reported
follow: Des Moines, 15 below; Sioux
City, 11 below; North Platte, 6 below;
Omaha, 4 below. A light snow was
falling today in western Missouri and
southeastern Kansas where the tem
peratures ranged from 15 to 20 de
grees above.
PRISON FOR ME SAYS BANKER.
Father and Son Confess Forgeries
Amounting to $165,000.
(Record Special)
Battle Creek, Mich., Jan. 4. —It's
Leavenworth Prison for me and the
sooner the better" said H. M. Dear
ing, the aged Albion banker as he
prepared to leave for Detroit today
with his son, P. M. Dearlng, in custody
of a United States Mar-liall. Father
and son confessed forgeries amount
ing to $165,000 that resulted in the
closing of the Albion National Bank
last Tuesday. "Is there any hope f r
the depositors?" the elder prisoner
was asked. For an instant the man
appeared on the verge of breaking,
down. Then he choked hack the
tears and replied, ''None at all". The
men were bound over to the federal
grand jury at Detroit under $25,000
bonds each.
1
i
i
!
'
RESUME HOSTILITIES
Shanghai, Jan. 4.—The Imperial
government in Peking today sent or
ders to all the Generals in command
of the Imperial troops to resume hos
tilities at 8 a. m., January 6 unless
they receive notification that the arm
itice between the two forces has been
again renewed. This step lias been ;
taken, it is assumed as a result of the
refusal of the Revolutionaries to con-1
tinue the negotiations with the Pek- j
ing authorities by telegraph in accor - 1
dance with the demand of Premier j
Y'uan Shi Kai. Telegraphic negotia- j
tions are regarded by both Dr. Sun J
Yat Sen and Wu Ting Fang as un
satisfactory. '
THINKS BOTH TAFT AND
LA FOLLETTE SHOULD RETIRE
La sing, Mich., Jan. 2.— Gov. Os
born, in a statement here today, pro
posed that President Taft and Senat
or La Follette both retire us presiden
tial candidates In favor of Roosevelt
or former Senator A. J. Beveridge.
The governor had prep . red. a speech
to be delivered in introducing Sen
ator La Follette In view of the fact
that the senator missed his train this
morning Governor Osborn authorised
FLAX CONTEST
PRIZE FOR BEST FLAX BROUGHT
IN TO THE FARMERS'
INSTITUTE.
A seed flax contest will be held at
the farmers' institute at Roundup on
Wednesday, January 24th. All far -
j ers who are raising flax are urged to
1 bring in one peek of seed and enter
it in the contest.
To prepare the flax, un it through
a fanning mill twice and be sure to
take out all sticks e.ioff, and light,
scaiy sec's.
'1 he seeds will be judged by a flax
expert frem the Agricultural College,
who will discuss the flax seed shown
and answer questions. A he seed
will be returned to the owners after
the contest.
Afund of $50'.0. s been turned
over to —e farmers' institute office
for flax e nt'st purpos the As
sociation of Manufacturers of Linseed
Oil, who are anxious to stimulate in
terest in betier flax among the farm
ers of Montana.
A flax seed sprayer, valued at $15
for treating flax with formalin will
e given to the man who hrs the best
flax. It is understo - that the win
ner of this sprayer is o lend it to his
neighbors as mucu as possible.
OPPOSES ALLIANCE
Sena+ir Hitchcock Charge'-, A.<tri ,- s
trnt'on With Blundering Irto
Entanp'ing Allia-c
(Record Special)
Washington, Jan.-4 — Ch.i 'ging that
lh ; administration is blundering into
an entangling alliance wtt.ii Great Brit
ain, Senator Hitchcock, of Nebraska,
on the floor of the Senate today de
nounced the proposed arbritation
treaty with that country. He de
clared the plan to premit the Preident
to appoint commissioners to a high
court of arbitration without the con
sent of the Senate was revolutionary
and dangerous. The proposed treaty
he said would destroy the nation's time
honored treaty making plan and
would result virtually in the adoption
of the system practiced by the mon
archial powers." The president should
authorize three commissioners to
name and submit differences to ar
britration without consulting consti
tutionat representatives of the peo
ple of the United States," he insisted,
' that is the legitimate and holiest in
terpretation of his treaty. That is
.vliat the joint high commission is for It
is the trap in this treaty; it is a de
vice to premit entangling alliance by
empowering our executive to negoti
ate a treaty without restraint form
the Senate with Government of Great
Britain and in my opinion, Mr. Presi
dent, it must lead to entanglement of
the United State in the foreign policy
of Great Britain.
WOLGAST OUT OF DANGER.
Los Angeles. Cal., Jail. 4.— Ad Wol
gast, lightweight champion, who has
been threatened with an attack of
pneumonia was pronounced out of
danger by his pysicians last night.
"But that don't mean he is out of bed",
remarked manager Tom Jones, "for ' e
isn't. Wolgast will be kept in bed
for a few- days until every chance for
a relapse lias disappeared. Then he
will be allowed out only by degrees
and there will not be any more night
auto rides,
LA FOLLETTE IN JOLIET
Joliet, 111., Jan. 4.—Still suffering
from the effects of ptomaine poison
ing which attacked him late last night,
Senator Robert La Follette spoke for
half an hour here today in a crowded
theatre. He arrived here in care of
physicians.
Lansing, Mich., Jan. 2.—It was an
nounced this afternoon that Senator
Robert La Follette had decided to go
direct from Holly to Grand Rapids
and would not speak at Lansing today.
;
Centralia Wash., Jan. 2.—The band
it who shot and killed President Law
j renoe Bar, as a result of an attempted
1 holdup of the Farmers and Merchants
j Bank in Centralia last Saturday night,
j this morning was identified as A. B.
J Clark, a millwright employed at the
eastern mill in this city until Decem
' her 22.
the speech as a statement of his
view. He added: "As between Taft
and La Follette, I am for Taft." He
criticised Senator La Follette for hav
ing taken up those things that might
be termed popular which contained
the least danger to himself and frank
ly said that he did not believe Senat
or La Follette can be nominated for
the presidency or elected if nominat
ed.
"Mum.
SHOES
m
i
*
3
«T
fir
fir
(ll</USTHIGH ENOUGH N£RE
■RFECT TREAD.
MOOES NOT BAS HEM
& SUPPORTS ARCH OF
INSTEP HERE.
A Shoe that is RIGHT d* Q
and at the Right price yO$OU
HENDRIX MERC. CO.
FURNITURE
IfljE have just unloaded a car of
DU furniture which we are now
offering for sale at prices that will
convince you that we are selling
goods cheaper than any other store
in Roundup.
BRASS BEDS, Satin or Polish Finish, sold every- $4 ft QA
where for from $25 to $30, our price.............. JLv*
BUGS of all kinds at from $10 to $15 less than the price asked
for by any other store in Roundup.
Dewitt and superior sew
ING MACHINES. . .............
$ 30 -°°... $45.00
Chairs, Rockers, Davenports, Window Shades, Wall
Paper, Bedding., Blankets, Mattresses, Kitchen Cab
inets, etc.
We have the Agency for a Bed Spring
that is guaranteed for twenty years.
LOWEST PRICES IN ROUNDUP
GUARANTEED
Picture Framing a Specialty
Krueger & Tulgestke
Roundup's Exclusive
FURNITURE STORE
BREWERS DISSOLVE
Milwaukee, Wis., Jan. 4.—The Jour
nal today says that the Western Brew
ers Shipping Association, one of the
leading trade organizations of the
United States, has dissolved, it being
said by some of Its own members that
it was in violation of the Sherman
Anti-Trust Law.
CHINESE MINISTER LEAVE8
Washington, Jan. 4.—ihe Chinese
Minister to Washington Chang Yian j
Tang has decided to quit his post here
after a stay of a year and a month. :
'toe reason for his dec!-ion is un
known. He will leave the capital next |
week for China, taking h - family with '
him and leaving Yung Rwai, the first
seccretary in caarge of the legation,
TROUBLE IN PORTUGAL.
(Record Special)
Lisbon, Jan. 4—Ensuing on the pun
ishment of the Partriarch of Lisbon,
M e r - Anthony Mondes Bello, whom
the Portuguese government ordered
expeled for 2 years, all the Portuguese
Bishops today proclaimed their inde
pendence of the government The
Minster of Justice declared that it
they presist in their refusal to recog
nize the Civil authorities, they
would all be expelled from Portugal
and that he would hold them respon
slble for any disturbances. The ex
.pulsion of the Patriarch caused dis:
turbances in the Capital today. Ten
' thousand persons proceeded to the
patriarchial to offer their condolnacgs
to the departing prelate.

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