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The roundup record. (Roundup, Mont.) 1908-1929, November 29, 1912, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075094/1912-11-29/ed-1/seq-3/

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BROKER MCCS'
By HARRY
(Coprricht, ltll, by American Preis Asso
ciation.]
M OGGS was despondent. De
spondency's chief causes in
a man are ill health, busi
ness troubles, love affairs.
But Moggs was original. His state of
hypochondria was Induced by none of
these complaints. He was worried
solely because Thanksgiving was but a
day off and he would have nothing to
do. Prom this you draw that Moggs
IBB MEN WERE SATISFACTORILY FITTED
OCT.
was given to enjoying himself, ami
your draw Is a correct one, for he was
young, sportive and gay.
Incidentally Moggs was a stockbro
ker. He was an assiduous member of
the exchange—assiduous in that he was
ever seeking out his college friends,
talking with them, joking with them,
playing pranks upon them. X broker
need not necessarily spend all of his
time around the posts.
Physically Moggs was rather attrac
tive His work at college bad earned
him several athletic suffixes. He had
been very popular, but when be re
turned to Parker Heights, the exclu
sive settlement wherein Moggs* par
ents dwelt, opinion was rather diver
Rifled on the point. The girls liked
him, the men liked him. but the older
and more staid element reserved sen
tence.
This day before Thanksgiving,
though, was an especially dull one for
Moggs. The girls were giving a dance
that night, to which none of the men
was Invited—in fact, ordered to stay
away; warned that If they didn't trou
ble would ensue.
A shadow of hope returned to his
woebegone face wben he looked up to
End bis old friend Dick North stand
,
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ATPBABED SrDDKNI.Y AT THE DOOR AND
FLAUNTED A CARD OF ADMISSION.
Ing before him. Moggs put forth a
Ump band, which the newcomer grasp
ed daintily.
"Cheer up. Moggs," said Dick. "To
morrow's Thanksgiving."
"All the more reason why I
Shouldn't." grumbled Moggs belliger
ently. "Brilliant prospects ahead—sit
borne and suck my thumbs."
"Why." said Dick, "that's queer. I
have about the same perspective in
eight"
"Come up and visit me then at the
heights." said Moggs, bis face bright
ening a little. "It'll be beastly slow,
though." be added fretfully. "There
K
0
T
A
AK0TA1
Beery penmn nee,)» a binlneaa
training. It eoKta no mere at tbla
»real Buaineta. Ranking aiul
Shorthand rniu-ge. under exact
idBre condltluin*. than at a amall,
ineatlonable one. The result» are,
•rar, *ery different. rir.O D.
[B. C. pupila went ta excellent
itloaa In banka and offlcea tbla
r—bad ralla for orer 500. AU
banka and 685 othera eta
|p!oy D. B. C. pupila aa raahlera,
filers, bookkeepers or stenngra
ihera. N» ottier school offers
such endorsement.
EVELOPsd
USINE
• - fyW
-• - • :g ; ''
[Our $*iO rotirRO pn par«*R for biiMr.e«ii
for for position a« ol»*rk or !• keeper.
Our new course in «'• «nit
Banking (endorsed by llMiik«*ra* A «*•■»
nation). aur»|>!iea fn*ht«-rN «nd teilen*
f<»r tit# Northwestern bank«. and
.bookkeeper« and credit men for tho
Barger concern«. Th# »Wthand
[cours# innder two expert reporter«),
[train* court reporters and high grit 4«
[stenographer«. The stenographers for
[the r s. District Court. N. p. Sn
Ipreme Court. Third Judicial District
[and th<* Cass Co. i'iiurt D. B. C.
[-radiutes. II. t».«-r w )»«*•.]« oiTer this
1 1'RooF «jf »Ufierit.r traiuing?
WAINS IOR
0
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L
E
G
E
0LIEGE
The D B. r. h«« t » magnificent
*v hi.i. du v I - 1 1 •- g < ni. «' feet of
~j.ii*'* *, - , vd .I' « r 11 t. j*
has li.O typ.-wiiters adding :bj< hiiie*,
biller*, money changer»«. »•»«-. Our
pupila deal with each other ■ id with
elegantly equipped office*. >3 •!•*
ainum money. Our cour* ire f*»
cl nation «nd practical—p< 'I* Ilk«
them. The Northwest b«a ' No other
«'*tiool Ilk« tbe D. B. C."
V* xt term begin« toon. For booklet,
writ«
F. LZUUTD WATKIWS. Pre«..
WaUtno Block • • Fargo. H. D.
CASH
THAIKSCiVIIC
P. HOUGH
»_>
> a girls' dance, men excluded ; sort
If revenge, you know."
•'Now I begin to see light," Dick «aid,
his eyes twinkling. "I'll join you. of
course."
"What do you mean, Dick?" asked
Moggs with a half puzzled grin. "Sure
ly not"—
"Of course." said Dick. "Don't yon
suppose I knew what was on your
mind when you said that, old for?"
"Really, 'pon my honor, Dick"— be
gun Moggs.
"Never mind; stow it," answered
Dick. "You're cleTer, but yon can't
fool Dick North. Whan do we start?"
"At once." Moggs shonted over bis
•boulder as North lumbered after him.
Half an hour later the pair entered
a costumer's establishment on Forty
second street bearing the name of
lima. Falcone on the panel.
Madame was not at all surprised at
the request of Moggs and his compan
ion fbr female garments. She was a
veteran when It came to surprises.
The men were satisfactorily fitted out
with the necessary accouterments aft
er much laughter, which madame
conld not qnlte appreciate, knowing
nothing of the young men's plana
Parker Heights Is a highly conven
Uonal suburb of New York. Nobody
bnt highly conventional people live
there.
At the Mansion House all was bus
tie and excitement. Carriages began
to arrive shortly after 8 o'clock, for
this was to be a girls' dance, and very
late hours would not be kept. Al
though the younger set of Parker
Heights was exceptionally congenial,
the young ladies bad decided on this
caper without the presence of the men
chiefly out of pique, for as a matter of
fact the latter bad been entirely re
y
LIMPED BACK TO THEIR SEATS.
iponsible for this new rivalry which
bad suddenly sprung up between the
two sexes. They had impudently giv
eu a stag party on Halloween, and
now the girls were determined to even
up matters.
With the arrival of the musicians all
was in readiness to start the freeze
out. Sedate patronesses were scatter
ed about the spacious ballroom—a rep
resentative gathering of Hie female
residents of the heights—and when the
first strains of the orchestra floated
through the fernery that hid the mu
siciaus these joined in the dunce with
their charges. There were girls in
satin, girls In lingerie, girls in chiffon
and girls in foulard. Kiu-li a brilliant
intermingling of colors was never be
fore seen. There was not a single man
in his gloomy evening clothes to spoil
the spectrum.
But for all their care to exclude the
men the dancers little realized that
there were two within their very midst!
True, nobody could account for the
two strangers who bad appeared sud
denly at the door and flaunted card
ed admissiou before the eyes of tin
doorman, but in *he ensuing hurry
and bustle they had been temporarii;
forgotten. Garishly, almost ludi r.■il
ly, dressed, the two had .later m
peared in the ballroom to sp t< --.
and dance together. One of i; «> pa
ironesses had even gone over to ho
friend them, hut she had l>-.>e!i one
rageously rebuffed. And yet n• • I>> <1 -,
sus|iected the wily Moggs or his friend
North.
Except for this little incident, ev
erytbing ran along smoothly at flr<t
There were waltzes and twosteps
the ancient lancers and the newfan
gled barn dance. The latter came
near proving the undoing of the two
masqueraders, for. first of all. North
wasn't an adept at it. and then barn
dancing tends to show the feet to
good advantage And such feet! Clad
I

I
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la saffron colored satin slipper*. It waa
a miracle where Mme. Falcone had
been able to purchase such monsters.
They looked incongruous amid the
dainty dancers. After one round of
the room North grunted something to
Moggs, and the two returned to their
sent* to remain wallflowers during the
rest of that number.
But their Waterloo was yet to come
I "Figures" were presently announced,
■ In which everybody was expected to
take part. This was to be the Anal
I number for the evening, after whieh
; refreshments were to be served to the
dancers, so Moggs pressed North's
band, and North pressed Moggs' hand
In a grip that said. "We must get
through this or we are lost." Two or
three figures passed off successfully
and the young men were beginning to
hng themselves wben a final figure was
described. Half of the girls present
were to remove their right slippers and
deposit them In a general pile In the
center of the room. The other half
would then dance across the floor, play
football to secure a alipper and dually
waits with the girl whose foot the slip
per fit And. as luck would have It.
Moggs and bis friend were among
those chosen to remove the right foot
fear.
There was nothing left for them to
4o but comply with the choice. How
•ver, North wanted to protest that he
had n sore foot and dare not remove
the slipper, but then Moggs objected
because there would be no excuse left
for him to give. Moggs* theory was
that misery liked company. And mis
ernble they surely were In the face of
probable discovery; but, accepting tbolr
fate, they stepped quickly to tbe mid
dle of the room, where the slippers
were rapidly accumulating, and with a
quick jab thrust their betrayers deep
Into tbe pile. Then they limped hnck
to their seats and bid their feet be
neath tbe friendly skirts.
The ensuing crash of music sounded
more like a dirge to the high strung
Moggs than like the tuneful air it
really was. With a light cry part of
the girls executed a lively dive dance
for the slippers and were soon intent
on snatching out a pretty one. Several
Urnes the ycung men saw their brogan
ish slippers tossed high In the air as
though some damsel had refused to ac
cept the owner of such clodhoppers for
a partner. Finally only two young
ladles remained to pick slippers—un
fortunate maidens!—and there were
only two slippers left to be picked.
There was nothing else for the young
ladies to do but rescue these, which
they did with n bad grace, hesitating
and glancing suspiciously at them.
Fortunately the other girls were too
busy finding partners to notice their
dilemma.
Moggs saw that something must be
quickly done to prevent a catastrophe.
He rushed over to the bewildered
young ladies, with North trailing along
behind.
"Here," said Moggs in a voice of
anguish which he entirely forgot to
tone to femininity, "that's my slipper.
I'll put it on."
"And the other's mine," chimed in
North.
The young ladies stared in amaze
ment at the claimants.
"There, there." pleaded Moggs sooth
ingly as he raised his foot In a most
unladylike fashion to ndjust the slip
per; "don't say a word."
They obeyed him. They didn't say a
word: they just screamed. And flint
scream reached the cars of everybody
er
/
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abacs. eJ
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TUET WERE BEATEN, TRET WERE BIRCHED,
THEY WERE SCRATCHED.
in the room. Dancing and mush
ceased as though a thunderbolt hud
suddenly descended upon the assem
blage.
"It's all up." Moggs had said he
tween his teeth, and tbe two bad made
a dash for the door, which they had
little trouble in reaching. Surprise had
been so general that it was easy for
them to get out of the room before an
olarm was raised, but they found
I
PREPARING FOR
WMJH EUROPE
HALF OF EUROPEAN ARMY GET
TING READY FOR INLAND
SERVICE.
LONDON. Nov. "4.—Half the arm-1
ies of Europe are being prepared,
secretly, f or instant war service, in
the event the call to arms should
come as a result of serious difficulties
over the division of the conquered
Turkish territory. Austria last night
had 400.000 men under arms. Of this
number 300,000 are massed on the
Servian frontier. Reservists are re
porting for duty at every military post
in the country.
Russia is rushing her forces to the
Austrian frontier. Owing to the cen
sorship it is Impossible to judge of the
umber of men being prepared for duty
under the banner of the Czar. It is
known, however, that the don Cos
sacks have been ordered to mobilize
•nd experts declare that Russia can
put more than 1,000,000 men on the
field on brief notice, should necessity
arise.
Germany has ordered 130.000 re
serves to be prepared for instant ser
vice .Other re-ports. all of doubtful
value because of tbe censorship de
clare that mobilization on a large scale
already has started in the empire.
It is also stated tht Italy, Austria's
ally is quietly making arrangements
to put her forces in the field whenever
he call comes. Britan's fleet has been
ready for weeks. It ean be rushed In
to service whenever orders are Issued.
ALLIED ARMIES
SURPRISE EUROPE
THE TURK PICKED AS WINNER
PROVED LIKE CHAFF BEFORE
STRONG WIND.
LONDON, Nov. 23.—'The phenomen
al success of the Allied armies in tin
war between the Balkan states and
Turkey is a feature of this bloody con
Hct that has dumbfounded the military
experts of all Europe. Like so much
chaff before a strong wind, the sup
posedly invincible Turkish army has
been swept thru its domain by the
Balkan invaders.
When the little kingdom of Monte
negro on the west raised the curtain
on the present conflict by declaring
war and rushing across the Turkish
border, all Europe expected a hard
struggle, but the Turks were picked
by military experts as winners. The
sudden reversal of orm on the part of
the Turkish army came as a distinct
j Surprise.
j Not only has the Turk been attacked
mud defeated by the Bulgarian, Servian
land Montenegrin on the north, but the
most despised Greek on the south has
Iliad the satisfaction of heating his old
time enemy and capturing the neigh
boring cities. It has been presumed
I for years that Turkey was possessed
I el' an excellent fighting machine. The
j present struggle lias revealed a total
lack of organization. The Allies, on
the other hand have 1...... silently pre
paring for this conflict several years.
With a patience and cunning sur
passing even that of the Orientals
1 against whom they have pitted, Servia,
: Bulgaria, Greece and Montenegro have
j fostered their hatred, strengthened
; tln-ir military and hided their time.
'or months and years before the actual
i outbreak of the war the officers of
those four countries have percolated
thru the devious defiles of the moun
tainous country that separated their
countries from Turkey. Here they
observed the Turkish positions and
plotted battery stands for their own
artillery. The sum total of their ob
servations left tln-ir advance on Con
stantinople planned step by step be
fore the first rumor of trouble filtered
across the telegraphs of Europe.
+ LABOR NOTES ♦
******************
Laundry workers in C'hieknsha, Okla.
have formed a local
Very few print cutters in the United
States and Canada are outside of labor
I organizations; in fact 95 per cent of
them belong to unions.
The Butchers' Unnion at San Fran
cisco, will take action on a proposition
to reaffiliate with the international
union.
The flour, feed, cereal, mill, and
rain warehouse workmen at Kan Fran
ciseo are discussing a proposed organi
zation.
At a recent convention of the Cigar
.Makers' International Union, a resolu
tion to inaugurate an old age pension
. .S s v
Send for
the KC
COOK'S
BOOK-.
Its FREE.
JBy
Jfrs.
JKKenziemi. „
Read Caref ully In the wonderful K C Cook's Book,Mrs. Janet
McKenzie Hill, of Boston Cooking? School
fame, tells every housewife how to become an expert cook-how to prepare
^fore*Ü»em an,î ' ,SlM * tlle <ttmily wil1 8° simply wild over what you^t
Ü C Cook s Book is illustrated In 9 colors, contains 90 tested and
proven recipes that will be successful every
tinu if the few simple suggestions are' followed.
The K C Cook's Book has been prepared
at an expense of many thousands of dollars,
and if purchased at a store would easily cost
50 cents, yet we give it absolutely free as we
want you to know exactly what K C Baking
Powder is and what it will do for you in
your own kitchen. You need this won.
derful book—it is of vital importance
io every housewife.
Qg gy CAN GUARANTTt
<5
How to get the
Cook's Book
Jaoi'ES \
Mfg. Co.\
Dept, «ui«
Chicago
Write your name and address
plainly on this coupon. At
k tuch the colored certificate
packed in 25-eent cans,
i », sending liotli to ns.
\ Yon will lie mighty Kind you
\ did. JtiQUFS Mfg* Co
\ Chicago
r*?i close errtifi
n<! I lie Cook
K 1 . 1 .,
JA QUES MFG.C0.
-Chicago
Lçan guaranS
Name
f P
*r
m
Ml
.-T"»
Oac *1 tke May bailfag* pit ay by as s Raaafap. riaa» tad Eitiautri cbaarfaU* fs rs i xLad
J. H. GRANT Contractor
ROUNDUP. MONTANA
GET THE HABIT
*********** AND TRADE AT ♦♦♦ ********
Hendrix's
WALK A BLOCK AND SAVE A DOLLAR.
dVO
■W- S I AI
LANTERNS
Don't Blow
Out in the Wind
They are built for rugged use.
Built strong and durable.
Built so that they won't blow
out; so that they won't leak and won't smoke.
When you buy a RAYO, you buy a well : made
lantern — the best that experts can produce.
At Dealers Everywhere
CONTINENTAL OIL COMPANY
Danvar, Pueblo, Albuquerque,
Chejreene, Bulla, Be La, Sail Lake Cil».
system was defeated.
The Moving Picture Operators' Un
ion at San Francisco lias made a de
mand upon owners of moving picture
theatres for a six-day week.
The controversy between tho theatrl
al syndieates nnd the American Feder
ation of Musicians, which for a time
threatened trouble, has been adjusted.
Members of the Hotel and Restau
rant Employes' Alliance, at Mlnneapo
is, Minn., are advocating the formation
of a seperatc local, to be composed
only of waitresses.
An A. F. of L. national transporta
tion department, to Include the miners,
railroad men, freight handlers, clerks,
longshoremen, teamsters, tugboat and
lighter rneti) and the sailors, was
recommended to the A. F. of L. Con
vention at Rochester, N. Y.
i !.. industrial Accident Commission
; ; pointed by Governor Tener, of Penn
- - 'v inia. to provide a Workmen's Com
•I -ation Act, will recommend the
bill approved by tho State Federation
of Labcr, which provides that all com
ation shall be paid direct by the
• 'over to the employe.
T b e Associated Anti-Japanese
League of .California, with headquart
ers iu San Francisco, has been organiz
ed. The object Is to promote the
movement against Japanese occupation
and industry. At the coming session
of the State Legislature the league
will work for the passage of an Allen
Land Law.
Nearly a hundred thousand employ
es of the United States Steel Corpora
tion in Ohio will be insured against
death and injury under the Workmen's
Compensation Law-, when negotiations
now pending between representatives
of the corporation and the state Lia
bility Board of Awards are consum
mated.
BELGRADE, Nov. 23.— The body of
General Fethi Pasha, former Turkish
minister at Belgrade who commanded
the Cth Turkish army at Monastlr was
found by the Servians among the
corpses on the battle field. It Is con
sidered probable that he committed
suicide.
Your hat Is here—Fad.

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