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The roundup record. [volume] (Roundup, Mont.) 1908-1929, March 21, 1913, Image 1

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HELENA, MONTANA
Historical öocl«t;i
The Roundup Record
VOLUME V. NO. 52.
ROUNDUP, MUSSELSHELL COUNTY, MONTANA, FRIDAY, MARCH 21, 1 913.
$2.00 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE
BOND ELECTION
IS TOMORROW
GENERAL 8ENTIMENT IN FAVOR
OF $13,100 BONO IS8UE TO
COMPLETE SCHOOL.
Tomorrow, Saturday, the qualified
voters of District No. 55, which in
cludes the city of Roundup and Camp
No. Three, will vote on the proposition
whether or not the district shall be
bonded in the amount of $13,100.00
for the purpose of building an addition
to the present school building. The
election will be held at the school
house, the polls being open from two
o'clock to six p. m.
As far as The Record has been able
to ascertain sentiment seems to be in
favor of the bond issue almost unani
mously, and there is no doubt that it
will carry. Anyone who is undecided
in the matter should take the trouble
to investigate conditions at the local
school before casting his ballot. On
account of the congested condition of
the school the board bas found it
necessary to rent two additional rooms
down town to take care of the child
ren applying for admission
With the steady growth the city is
undergoing the matter of providing
facilities for the increased number of
school children would become a seri
ous problem if the bond issue should
not carry
As the $13,1100.00 bond issue con
templated at this time is not quite
sufficient to complete the school build
ing as originally planned, the school
board has called a special school meet
ing for Saturday, April 5, for the pur
pose of authorizing the board to ex
pend any surplus there may be after
providing school for nine months in
improving the building and grounds.
It is expected that the surplus after
meeting the running expenses of the
year will be sufficient to take care
of the deficit.
OR. FRIEDMANN TELLS 8UF
FERERS TO AWAIT RESULTS
NEW YORK, Mar. 20.—Dr. Fried
mannn, the German specialist, issued
a statement today advising persons
who have intended to come to this
city from different parts of the coun
try for his vacc ine treatment to await
until the government tests of his
remedy have been completed. "Dc.n't
come to New York at the present time"
said the statement. ''Stay at home
and keep your patience. It will not
be long before you have the oppor
tunity of receiving my treatment. A
trip to this city would consume your
strength and vitrdity. So do not come,
because I can new trea only those suf
ferers selected by the government
physicians."
FIVE DEAD IN XPLOSION
MEDICINE HAT, ALBERTA, Mar.
20.—Five are dead and ten badly in
jured as the result of an explosion of
gas when the three-story building of
the Western Canada Cold Storage and
Packing Plant burned here last night.
The property loss exceeded $100,000.
Despite reports that many were caught
in the ruins no bodies were found by
searchers today. Many of the njured
were spectators who, watching the fire,
were crushed when three of the walls
were forced outward by the explosion.
All the injured are expected to recover
PARIS, Mar. 20.—Jean Barthou,
minister of justice in the retiring
French cabinet, was requested today
by President Pcincare to form a new
cabinet to take the place of the minis
try under the premiership of Aristide
Briai'.id, which resigned owing to its
defeat on a vote of confidence in the
senate upon the proportional repre
sentation bill.
ENGLAND SS 3ÏS
PLEASEDAT BRYAN
VIEWS EXPRESSED AT ST. PAT
RICK'S DAY BANQUETS CAUSE
CRITICISM
LONDON, March 19.—Following up
the Post's attack on William J. Bryan,
the American secretary cf state, ferj
his speeches at the St. Patrick's day:
banquet at Washington Saturday even-|
ing and the Irish Fellowship Club ban
quet at Chicago Monday, the Standard!
says:
"If Mr. Bryan rea'liy expressed the
views of the cabinet and the president,;
the relations between Great Britain;
and the United States may enter upen
a phase which would be regarded with
extreme regret by a majority of the
sensible moderate persons of both
countries."
The Standard describes Secretary
Bryan's speech as a fine example of
"virulent and inflated nonsense which
the inferior kind of demagogue talks
when he wants to catch Irish votes."
The Standard regrets the speech
which, it says, is impossible to pass as
a more discretion just as the Panama
bill w coming before the house, and
fear
that the Irish electioneering ma
Chi t
■ry> will be sought to b ar in
cf discriminatory toils, "and"
add'
he standard, "if this is to rr
ceiv
the open snport cf the admin
l ;
ion, the prospects of R just and
fnv
cloi. • ■
!' settlement weu'd
fut."
♦+♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦+♦♦♦♦♦♦
♦ ♦
♦ AGED COUPLE MARRY ♦
♦ BELLEVILLE^ ILL,, Mar. +
♦ 20.—When J. H. ftcott. 73 years ♦
♦ old, and Mrs. And& V. Brim, 63 ♦
♦ fears old, were married here ♦
♦ yesterday. He took his fourth ♦
♦ bride and Mrs. Brim for the *
♦ fourth time became the wife ♦
♦ of a civil war veteran. Scott ♦
♦ hobblbed to the court house <8
♦ on crutches, the result of a ♦ j
♦ bullet wound received at the ♦
♦ battle of Shiloh. ♦
♦ ♦
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
BALKAN SITUATION
CLOSE TO CRISIS
AUSTRIAN GOVERNMENT MAKES
8EVERAL PEREMPTORY DE
MANDS ON MONTENEGRO !
VIENNA, AUSTRIA. Mar. 20.—The !
Austrian government brought the Bal- ;
kan situation close to a crisis today
in making several peremptory der j
mands on Montenegro. The Austrian I
minister at Cettinje, the Montenegrin ;
capital was instructed to inform the j
Montenegrin government that it must !
comply with the following: The freej
exit from the fortress of Scutari of all
non-combatants. Explanation of the
death of a catholic priest named Palie,
who is said to have been killed be
cause he opposed the violent con
venions of prisoners. Violent conver
sions must ceqse instantly.
Full satisfaction must be given for
the violence shown by the Montene
grins and Servians at San Giovanni de
Medua on.-ihe Adriatic coast toward
the crew of the Austrian merchant
vessel Skodra. Three Austrian battle
ships and three smaller warships left
Pola, the chief Austrian Naval sta
tion yesterday for an unknown desti
nation. It is supposed they are to
support today's demands.
ALBANY, N. Y„ Mar. 20.—The re
port of the state labor department in
its investigation of conditions among
the Little Falls textile workers
brought to public attention by the
recent strike has been made public.
"Certainly it is a matter of grave
public concern," the report says,
"when a considerable body of wage
earners are found living in such con
ditions as are revealed by this re
port. There is reason to suppose that
more or less similar conditions are
to be found elsewhere/*
The men received a weekly salary
of $9 or less. The women received
css than $7.50. Monthly rent of the
space occupied by a single family or
groups runs from $0 to $1S. Of living
conditions, the report says: "The
mouses are f-ame structures, built sin
■gly or in groups. Bathrooms are en
tirely absent, leaky roofs make dry
rooms impossible. Ventilation always
Is bad. Cellars v. i re found filled with
water, ashes, waste, garbage and ma
nure.
' Sleeping rooms a;v small, and mus
ty when the number vhk-h they ae
comodafe is considered. gcvV- are
windowless. Over croud 'ng is the
ml. Owing to ignorance cf the need
i' fresh air, in a sleeping room, win
dows are kept contsantly closed, even
the cracks being filled or covered.
Dealers state that the mill workers
buy a fairly good grade of food, but of
the children enrolled in the schools
cne-sixth are sucering from malms
trition."
WOMAN WILL HAVE ANOTHER
PARADE AT WASHINGTON
WASHINGTON, D. C„ Mar. 20.—
Another parade here is planned by
the executive committee of the nation
al American Womens' Suffrage Asso
ciation for April 7, when the extra
session of congress convenes. This
time the parade will be neither so
long nor o elaborate as the one mar
red by the disorders March 3. 531
women Including representatives from
each congressional district and from
each state at large, will form and
march to the capitol where they will
present to the members of congress
their arguments and petitions in favor
of equal suffrage.
DR. ELIOT MAY BE AM
BASSADOR TO ENGLAND
WASHINGTON, D. C., Mar. 20.—
At the White House today it was said
that the reported declaration of Chas.
W. Eliot, president emeritus of Har- •
vard, that he would decline a diplo
matic pest if one were offered, might
not deter President Wilson from urg
ing Dr. Eliot to reconsider and take
under advisement an offer of a foreign
post. The appointment to London was
thought to be the most likely offer if
one w-ere made. It has been report
ed that Dr. Eliot declined a similar
offer from Mr. Taft. John H. Mott
of Montclair, N. J.. it was said today,
has declined an offer of appointment
as minister to China.
LINCOLN, NEB., Mar. 20— Back to
his Lincoln home for the first time
since the day after the election in
November which ;.!;:fed Wood"* w
Wilson in the presidential chair and
paved the way for him to becoin • a
■art cf fir
re :en.
v :i" jrre-'tiriî. ? • r n cp-o of X» *
1 raska.
ST. PAUL, Mar. 19.—Initiative and
: - ■ <'. ■; bill ? ■■ r pass d last
nicht ly the rr rate r.f Im ' -
' ; ; TV y * ' \ r for
THE EXPRESS COMPANIES ARE NOT THE ONLY ONES
HIT— PERHAPS.
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PA*C eL
J§ POST IN
' CATAVIA
OHIO
H. P. LAMBERT BE
COMES A6ENEDICT
RETURNS WEDNESDAY WITH
BRIDE WHO FORMERLY WAS
MRS. FRANCES H. SEEGER
Altho rumors were quite persistent
several weeks ago when Harry P.
Lambert left for the East on a "busi
ness" trip that everything was not
just exactly as he would have his
friends and associates here believe,
it remained until Wednesday noon when
he stepped off the train with a bride
on his arm to dispel all doubt as to
the real motive of hist "business"
expedition. The bride proved to be
Mrs. Frances H. Seeger, well known
here, having lived on a homestead five
miles west of Roundup until some
time last year when she returned to
her home in Council Bluffs, la. The
marriage took place at the home of
the bride's parents, Captain and Mrs.
G. H. Richmond, in Council Bluffs,
Saturday evening, March 15th.
After spending a few days in the
Twin Cities the newly married couple
returned to Roundup, arriving here
Wednesday noon. On the evening of
their arrival Harry was inveigled up
to ihe Pioneer Club where he was
required to explain things and right
himself with his numerous friends who
gathered there to extend their con
gratulatons.
Next Thursday evening a reception
v i 1 be given by tin* Pioneer Club, of
which Mr. Lambert is president, in
honor cf the newly weds.
GOVERNOR OF CONNECTICUT
VETOES FREE PASS BILL
HARTFORD, CONN., March 20 —
Gvernor Baldwin has vetoed the "free
jiiiss bill" as unconstitutional The
measure would have amended the
charters of all common carriers in the
s:ate so as to provide for passes to
members of the legislature. An at
tempt to repass the measure over his
veto failed.
iNDICTMENTS AGAINST JACK
SULLIVAN IS DISMISSED
NEW YORK, Mar. 20.—The indict
ment against Jack Sullivan, "King
Newsboys," charging him with com
plicity in the murder of Herman Ros
enthal, has been dismissed for lack of
evidence. This disposes of the last
of the indictments found against the
seven alleged murders. As Sullivan
left the Tombs he was rearrested on
an indictment charging him with bri
bery. This indictment was found by
the grand jury investigating police
graft.
LITERÀRY SOCIETY PROGRAM
Tne Following is the Program to be
Rendered at the Meeting of the
Literary Society at the
School House Tonight.
Male Quartette.
Recitation............Delbert Cawley
Vocal Solo...........Raul B. Burlians
Monologue..........Margaret Lennon
Recitation.............Hazel Hopkins
Trio.
Recitation............Lawrence Fisco
i dnlc-guc,..........Christian Knudsen
Raymond Kibble
Ria.io Duel
Oct : to:—"Resolved, That Woman
Si.ru'd Be Admitted to file Right of
Suffrage." Affirmative: Rev. R.
I I»'!:,.ns, Mr. H. J. Jeffries, K.;q.
'' sive: Coîcnt I Cru!! and H. S.
OPPOSED TO TOBACCO TRUST
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THE
STANDING OF
HE CONTESTANTS
THE BIG CONTEST CLOSES AT 9
O'CLOCK MONDAY EVENING,
MARCH 31st.
Standing of the contestants in the
$400 Piano Contest for week ending
Wednesday, March 19,1913.
No. 1....................... 0,152,180
No. ?....................... 5,585,080
No. 7....................... 6,395,200
No. 9....................... 5,441,824
No. 10...................... 6,222,316
No. 13......................11,643,866
No. 14...................... 5,Uhl,360
No. 15...................... 5,357,430
No. 17...................... 7, 771,21g
No. 19...................... 4,938,020
No. 20.......... 16,587,020
No. 22...................... 5,622.150
No. 23...................... 5,005,455
No. 26...................... 5,264,300
No. 32......................14,513,035
No. 35...................... 9,099,100
No. 36...................... 5,020,090
No. 38...................... 6,605,530
No. 43......................15,417,145
No. 49...................... 6,227,025
No. 50,.....................16,775,060
No. 52...................... 5.474,030
No. 53...................... 7,973,610
No. 66...................... 4,639,875
No. 57...................... 9,190,865
$ I Of;/.CO BURGLAR HAD
A WOMAN ACCESSORY
'AN FRANCISCO, Mar. 19. Mr
Catherine Pope, alias "Kitty," under!
arrest, in Detroit in connection with
tlie operations of Owen D. Conn, the
$100,000 burglar, held in this city, i
was indicted as an accessory in Conn's!
alleged crimes late last right here by!
tiie grand jury. A detective started j
for Detroit today with requisition pap
ers for her return. The grand jury
heard n witnesses, including residents
whose homes had been looted and
pawnbrokers with whom the jewelry
had been placed. An indictment was
also returned last night against Ru-j
pert F. Hooper, former head of Ihe I
trust department of the Mercantile |
Trust Company of this city, charging I
embezzlement. Hooper is in custo dy j
and his shortage is said to total over
$14,000.
WASHINGTON, D. C., Mar. 19 —
Rresident Wilson's statement of the
administration's attitude towards
American bankers' participation in Ihe
Chinese loan and foreign loans gi-ner
ally has attracted wide spread coin
'ment intimations that negotiations
may now proceed as a live-power nf
jtVr, without the American group. It
is pointed out today that the bankers
of China's creditor nations especially
may now- be counting on the moral
: report of the government to continue
to press provisional President Yuan
Shi Kai to grant, the loan, but there
also some indi n* Ions cf discord
fr ■ d in the conflict in ' claims of the;
va-'ous .rationalities for prédominât-'
i.nfloonci in the appointment, of
inistrators cf th lean and for its;
'M r.d ' > .
" URTH CLA nr. POSTMASTERS
t- RE SENDING IN -E5!G
ONS
' }- ;
Mirth ;
"
part
n * a
ly •
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*******++
♦ ♦
+ DANCERS MUST REGISTER ♦
+ -— ♦
♦ GRAND FORKS, N. D. Mar. +
♦ 20.—Patrons of Grand Forks *
♦ dance halls will have to régis- ♦
♦ ter their names at the doors ♦
♦ as they enter under the terms ♦
♦ of an ordinance just passed ♦
♦ by the city council. Girls un- ♦
♦ der 18 years aer barred entire- ♦
♦ ly unless they are accompanied ♦
♦ by guardians.
♦ ♦
♦♦♦+♦+♦♦+++**+♦**+
KING'!
ASSASSIN
WAS ANARCHIST
HAD GRUDGE AGAINST THE KING
WHOM HE SHOCTS IN THE
BACK.
NEW YORK, Mar. 19.—Aleko Schiti
as, the assassin of King George of
Greece, was a confirmed anarchist, ac
cording to information obtained by
Demetries- Dotasis, Greek consulate
here. The man had a grudge against
the king. Mr. Botasis was told so to
day by Greeks in this city who knew
Schinas well, because the government
had closed a pchool of anarchism
which Schinas had established at Huto
the chief city of Thessaly. Schinas
was born at Huto.
i
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SALOIKI, Mar. 19.—Aleko Schinas,
murderer of KLtig George I. of Greece
appears to have lived much abroud.
lie returned to this city when it was
occupied by the Greek army, after the
surrender of the Turkish gurrison.
Premeditation appears (o be establish
ed liy the fact that Schinas lurked in
hiding. He rushed out when his
royal victim was only six feet away
and fired point blank into the back of
the king. The shooting took place
only a few yards from police headquar
ters.
Lieutenant Colon Franicound, the
king's aide camp, was beside Ills royal
master anil immediately drew his re
volver. Schinas turned and fired at
Ihe aide camp, but the shot, went wild.
Two military policemen, who were
acting ns ail escort to the king, dashed
at. Schinas ami pinioned his arms be
fere he could fire again. Wlicti Fran
eound saw I bat the assassin iiail been
arrested ho supposed the king had es
caped injury and was surprised to
find his majesty stretched on the road
way. Frnncound raised the stricken
monarch from the pavement, but the
king was already unconscious and lie I
lever spoke again. Soldiers who had I
been summoned lifted the king from
I lie ground and carried him to a In spb:
tab Ik- expired on the way without
recovering consciousness,
FURS TO BE DEARLR.
LONDON, Mar. i!t. Altho the de- i
maud for furs has not been so great !
this season as in former years, many |
women who buy them at this season I
he< ause they are cheaper, reserving,
them for next year, are startled at |
the pn diction that furs will be dearer;
next year. The Easter trade lias in
creased tiie price in furs from 20 !
to 30 per cent, over last year's figures. I
A prominent feature of the sales is;
the increasing popularity of the!
Américain skunk. The only skin which
has showed a decline is the lynx.
SEATTLE, Mar. 19.—The snow
storm last tight and this morning ex
tended over the greater part of Wash
ington and Oregon with an average
fall of about five inches.
NEW YORK, Mar. 19.—The wed-;
dug on April 4 of Miss Ethel Rouse-!
velt, daughter of Colonel and Mrs.,
Theo. Roosevelt, to Dr. Richard Derby,
will take place in the episcopal church
Bay and will be followed by J
a breakfast to a large company, sev- ;
oral Viundrod in number, at Sagamore
Hill. The bridal couple will sail for
Hun pc tie day after the wedding.
CHICAGO AUTO BANDITS GIV
EN INDETERMINATE SENTENCES
CHICAGO, Mar. 19.—Robert Webb 1
an Thomas Burke, two leaders of the!
automobile bandits who terrorized this
city during the winter, phadod guilty
to burglary today and w< re ordered
to prison under the indeterminate s' n
' r-nr f
law why h unj;
« a
minimum
.r c
• y nr •" d a r. ;
ix'inui.
n or 21.
;
NOF( DAVID l
NVINC
ÎÎTQNE
;
ary
: t: -
• hilt: f • M
Li v ju -
■ . ie (lie
, d thru-'
out 1
:nglai »1 today.
in th!
s city the
animr ; j
■> ' ( l Dyn
erbury
I. es'd d
WILL SHOW US
HOWTO FARM
BEI . . FARMING TRAIN WILL
BE IN ROUNDUP NEXT
TUESDAY EVENING
I
I
The "Mlwaukee's" Better Farming
Train, which is making a trip cross
state under the auspices of the Mon*
tana Farmers' Institutes of Bozeman,
Mont., will be in Roundup next Tues
day evening. According to a schedule
received by The Record from the rail
road officials the train will arrive here
Tuesday evening at 6:00 o'clock, leav
ing again at 9:30 the same evening,
Quito a little interest is being taken
in the train by farmers as well as
other people, and it is expected that
It will be visited by a large number
while at the depot at this place.
The train consists of ten cars.
There will be 20 instructors along,
aiiid free lectures on important sub*
jects will bo given. Better farming
methods of all kinds will be demon
strated in the cars, and the train
should be seen by every farmer in thli
district.
The object of this train is to afford
farmers and others interested an o^
portunlty of securing at firsthand valu
able Information with regard to scien
tific farming in all of Its branches, In
cluding diversified farming, stock rais
ing, use of latest machinery, control
ing both animal and vegetable diaeaaM
use of Bilos, domestic systems for wa
ter, lighting and sewers, etc. House
hold articles designed to save time
and stremgth will bo shown by the d»
mestlc science department.
TOKIO, Mar. 20.—Ninety-nine of the
Koreans, charged with conspiracy
against Governor general Count
Terauchi of Korea in 1910, were found
not guilty by the court today, accord
ing to a dispatch from Seoul. The
judges sentenced Baron Yun Chi Ho, •
former Korean cabinet minister ae
well ns Yan Ki Tak, a Korean editor,
and three others to six years impris
onment each.
KIN6 OF GREECE
IS ASSASSINATED
IN PERSONAL COMMAND OP
HIS TROOPS WHEN 8TRUCK
DOWN
SALONIKI, Mar. 18.-—King Georgs
of Greece was assassinated here this
afternoon, King George, who had
taken personal command of his troops
during the earlier part of the war, had
been here since November, when the
Turkish fortress was occupied by the
Greek after a short seige. The Queen
of Greece also hns been here and has
paid great attention to the care of
the sick and wounded. King George
i,n December had a meeting with King
F< rdinand e| Bulgaria to discuss the
late of the eantured Turkish territory
after the war.
King George was in his fisth year
and had rilled 50 years. He was a
brother of Queen Mother Alexandria
of England and a son of the late King
of Denmark, lie was ehosen King of
the Helenes In 1863, in succession to
Otho I. A previous attempt to assas
sinate him was made in 1898 hut was
frustrated. King George was married
in October, 1867, to Princess Olga, eld
est daughter of the Grand Duke Con
stantine of Russia, a brother of the
late emperor Alexander I. Crown
I'rince Constantine, who has been in
active command of the Greek troops
throughout the hostilities in tho east
ern part of Turkey in Europe, and who
was at the head of the army which
recently captured the Turkish fortress
of Janina with its garrison of 32,000
men, will be the successor of his
father. Ills wife is Princess Sophia, a
sister of the German emperor.
LONDON, Mar. 18. Tho news of the
assassination of King George came
from the correspondent of the Greek
semi-official news agency at Saloniki.
It was filed at Saloniki at 6:35 p. m.
It is believed here that the censorship
is pp v< nting the dispatch of details.
Both the Greek embassy and tho
British foreign office are without offi
cial news of the assassination. Crown
Prince Constantine is still at Janina
with the Greek army. Queen Alexan
dria, who is King George's sister, had
not received any news at n. late hour.
King O'-ergo was often rated as an
autocratie monarch hut in spirit was
democratic: and did much for the
prosperity of Gre-ee, which advanced
rapidly und
r Ills rule. He took great
; rite rest i II
■ : ive fi r
c i rcmlzation of the do
R country, and with
the a: sista li
bre light 'he
• > f the Crown Prince
mi,!, io a slate of effi
eic icy V hie;
i ■ nahlfd it. to ovreome
the Turkish
r : ' rince at the begin
. . . f .- ( ,' f . -,
- — : " . name was men
r
i tilii i- • broke cut ns a
d' ney of n per
: :'t f: 1
• i of the Balkan.
- y*-.fop, coMsi*
;iire- f Bulge"t*!. Servla,

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