OCR Interpretation


Montana farmer-stockman. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1947-1993, June 15, 1951, Image 1

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075096/1951-06-15/ed-1/seq-1/

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3 ^ 444 . S'
Good pasture and hayland development, as illustrated
by this scene from the Beaverhead country, are im
portant phases of the grassland program being spon
sored by Montana State college in co-operation with
the United States department of agriculture.
v
9
im
AGRICULTURISTS ARE GENERALLY
agreed that grass is basic to a stable, profit
able and lasting agriculture. They also be
lieve that only by building farming and
livestock operations around this basic crop
can the nation continue indefinitely to sup
ply the food, fiber and shelter in the quan
tity and quality that is in keeping with the
standards Americans have set for them
selves.
In this belief in the basic nature of a
"grassland agriculture" the United States
department of agriculture and the land
grant colleges have launched jointly a pro
gram aimed at placing renewed emphasis
on the use of grass and legumes in strength
ening the nation's agriculture for the long
pull ahead.
The nature of the grasslands program will,
of necessity, vary according to the needs
and conditions that exist in each of the
states. Here in Montana the grasslands com
mittee at Montana State college has pre
pared a program designed to put greater
emphasis on helping farmers and- ranchers
MONTANA AND NORTHERN WYOMING
E
What Is the Program?
IT IS NOT a program, as a few have
been led to believe, of putting every acre
into grass and legumes at the expense of
cultivated crops. On the contrary, the
program is aimed at stimulating greater
interest among producers in making
grasses and legumes a PART of well
balanced farming and ranching systems,
that will conserve the soil, maintain pro
ductivity and at the same time build a
permanent and profitable agriculture.
Fundamentally Montana's grassland
program embraces five major phases—
range, irrigated pastures, nonirrigated
crop land, utilization- of grassland and
conservation.
The first of these—-range—is discussed
in this issue of Montana Farmer-Stock
man (see page 6) by Ray G. Johnson,
range specialist for the Montana Exten
sion service. The other four will be
treated in later issues.
make the best possible use of their range,
irrigated pastures and hay lands.
Actually most of the objectives of the
Montana State college grasslands program
have been a part of the institution's program
of service to farmers and ranchers for a
good many years. County extension agents
and specialists have long been advocating
the greater use of irrigated and dryland
pastures, improved grasses and the produc
tion of high quality forage.
So today's "grassland program" is largely
a fresh effort to encourage Montana farm
and ranch operators to make more and
better use of grasses and legumes in de
veloping a well balanced, long term agri
cultural economy in the Treasure state.
And, as Ray G. Johnson, extension range
specialist says, in this issue (see page 6), the
range program is set up to make available
to range producers the same caliber of pro
duction information on range as has long
been available in the field of cash crop pro
duction and animal feeding and breeding.

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