OCR Interpretation


Montana farmer-stockman. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1947-1993, July 01, 1957, Image 26

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075096/1957-07-01/ed-1/seq-26/

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PUTS LEANING & DOWN
GRAIN IN THE BULK TANK4
ORDINARY BAT TYP! REILS WILL NOT
PICK UP LEANING OR DOWN GRAIN.
THEY "KNOCK" HEADS AND KERNELS
PROM STANDING GRAIN. EVERY TIME
A BAT ENTERS YOUR STANDING GR
AIN IT KNOCKS "DOLLARS OUT O»
TOUR BULK TANK"! GRAIN THAT HALLS
TO THE GROUND IS LOSTI WHY FERT
ILIZE TO RAISE MORE GRAIN AND THEN
KNOCK STOUT AND LOSE IT WITH OB
SOLETE BAT TYPE RSELSf
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A Chaney Groin Sever will save you from Î to 4 bu. or mm pw acre... trow ton you
ASK YOUR DEALER
WRITE FOE NAME OF ÎTOUR DEALER—DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED
_afford irorip hove one?
FERRIS 'KILLI0N IMPLEMENT CO
■>
DISTRIBUTOR
119 Central Avenue West
Great Fail», Montana
IT WEIGHS 25% LESS... IS 40%
STRONGER

I
-NEW«
All-Steel Groimside
by
" C'-* 7 '• j
-VI
Built for the farmer who wants the best qualify at low cast, thisnew farm
body has all (he heavy-duty features that will save him time and money,
Help him realize more profit from smaller acreage at current market
prices... or to farm more land with less labor...by reducing his
hauling costs year after year. Matches the higher speeds and greater
capacity of modern harvesting equipment. There never has been a farm
body like Ihis before. From its new. extra-wide (32' x 1(F) grain gate to
the convenient places for tying tarpaulins, it is brand new. Fabricated
from high-slrengtb, cold rolled steel, in the modern manner of a stream
lined train—depending on scientific forming for strength rather than
weight—(he Streamliner weighs 25% less, but is 40% stronger. It is
embossed for extra strength and has four more stakes than similar
bodies. All joints have reinforced grain-tight flanges. Available with
"Slip-On" Stock Racks for hauling livestock or bulky loads and grain
tight Tip-Top Sections for increasing payloads, the Streamliner is truly
an all-purpose truck for every farm hauling job.
ED
I
TIP-TOP SECTIONS
INCREASE PAYLOAD
iiaia
wo west mm (\m manufactures, paris, iuinois
Ask Your loco! Truck Deofer or Write Yovr Noar ori ù lêMbvtor
SUP-OH STOCK RACKS
ro* uve stock hauuno
MIDLAND IMPLEMENT COMPANY, INC
KILLINGS
GREAT FALLS
26 —July 1, 1957
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Sfesa
By GILBERT GUSLEK
INFLATIONARY FORCES appear to
predominate in the non-farm sector of
the national economy. Industrial pro
duction has held nearly level for the
last 10 months, but incomes have con
tinued to rise because of the up-trend
in wage rates. The general level of
wholesale prices of commodities other
than farm products and foods continues
to creep higher.
CATTLE—Prices for upper grades of
fed cattle are likely to be steady to
moderately higher in the next few
months. They have been chopping up
and down without much net change in
the general level in the last two months.
Prices for lower grades of fed cat
tle and for grassers, which have moved
higher all spring, probably will soon
start a seasonal decline. However, sup
plies will be smaller and prices will
stay substantially higher than last year,
at least until late fall. Growers prob
ably will hold back grassers for maxi
mum weight gains, which will throw
an increased proportion of the supply
on the late season market.
Prices for stocker and feeder cattle
probably will decline as marketing of
grass cattle increases, but will con
tinue higher than last year and rela
tively high compared with fat cattle.
Recent sales of Good and Choice grades
on the range for fall delivery were
reported at $19-20 for yearling and two
year-old steers, $17.50-19 for yearling
heifers, $23-25 for steer calves and $21
22 for heifer calves.
HOGS—Prices are likely to fluctuate
widely in the next few weeks while
passing the peak for the year and the
price cycle. Market supply probably
is close to the low point.
This year's spring pig crop was
practically the same as that of 1956.
Growers plans point to an increase of
1 per cent in fall pigs. The ratio of
hog prices to feed costs probably will
continue favorable enough in the next
six months to stimulate a further
cyclical increase in hog production.
LAMBS—Prices are in a seasonal
downtrend that may not end until late
fall, but it will be interrupted by sharp
temporary upturns. Movement to mar
ket will gradually increase as more
of the Cornbelt and range crop reaches
good weight. It will pay to hold back on
sharp price breaks and sell on price
bulges,.
In recent range trading, sales of
Wyoming feeder lambs were made at
$18 a cwt. and Montana lambs at $18
18.50 for fall delivery. Many producers
are holding for more. White-faced year
ling breeding ewe sales for fall delivery
sold at $24-27 a head.
WHEAT—Cash prices probably will
IRRIGATION EQUIPMENT
Pumps • Parts
Sprinkler Irrigation
(Hand or Wheel-Move)
GRAHAM & ROSS
'"Everything fair the Growing West
524 1st Avenue South
Great Falls, Montano
Markets at a Glance
Prices—Inflationary trend continues In non
farm wages and prices.
Cattle—Prices for grassers will average sub
stantially higher than last year.
Hogs—Favorable feeding ratio will continue to
stimulate production.
Lambs—Waiting for price rallies probably will
pay.
Wool—Prices probably will hold, although
demand is slow.
Wheat—Price drop below support is probable
during harvest.
Feed Grain—Large production is again in
prospect.
Flaxseed—Price is already moderately below
new crop support.
Seeds—Weather is favorable for large new
crops.
Feedstuffs—Near-term prices are likely to be
steady to slightly higher.
Hay—Larger crop, smaller demand, are in
prospect.
Dairy Products—Milk-feed price ratio will con
tinue best in several years.
Eggs—Good seasonal price rise probably has
started.
Poultry—Summer increase in demand may
sustain recent price gains.
Potatoes—Light early summer crop will help
prices in next few weeks.
be steady to weak during the harvest
movement, then gradually move higher
as offerings taper off.
Crop prospects probably remain near
the early June forecast of 971 million
bushels, consisting of 73G million bush
els of winter wheat and 235 million
bushels' of spring wheat. Final out
turn may be reduced by rust or dam
age at harvest or raised by favorable
growing weather.
Domestic usage and exports during
the new season may approximate the
present crop prospect, but part of the
exports will come from government
owned carryover, so that placement
of 150 million bushels or more under
price support may be necessary to
cause enough tightness in "free" stocks
to pull prices up to support levels.
SEEDS—Price changes in the next
few months will depend greatly on new
crop harvests. Except in flooded areas,
weather has been unusually favorable
for starting new seedings and for
thickening old stands. High yields of
hay and forage will tend to increase
acreages available for making seed.
DAIRY PRODUCTS—Prices for milk
will work higher until around Novem
ber. Production will decline one-fourth
or more. Since consumption of fluid
milk is relatively constant, output of
manufactured products will drop more
than milk production. Milk prices will
continue the best in several years com
pared with feed costs.
Milk production in May reached an
all-time high and was 2 per cent over
a year ago. Although pastures were
the best in several years, dairymen
were feeding more grain per cow on
June 1 than ever before on that date.
EGGS—Prices appear to have started
a relatively strong seasonal rise that
will continue through the next three
months. They are likely to hold up

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