OCR Interpretation


Montana farmer-stockman. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1947-1993, October 01, 1960, Image 16

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075096/1960-10-01/ed-1/seq-16/

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My steers make market weight
3 weeks sooner since I paved
my feed lot with concrete!"
àé
Says ALFRED ASK, Triumph, Minnesota,
veteran feeder of choice and prime cattle
m
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m
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2*:
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I put steers into the lot at 650 pounds. On concrete,
they double their weight 21 days earlier—and do it on
less feed. Besides that, I save at least 30 minutes a day
getting feed out, plus cutting my cleaning time in half.
On concrete, you can always get feed to cattle-easily,
even in the worst weather. And in the dry season, there's
less dust. Cattle stay healthy the year around.
A concrete feed lot makes cleaning easy, fast. Tractor
scoops don't tear it up. No refilling. Concrete is a life
time investment in efficiency. Yet initial cost is low.
«
CUP —MAIL TODAY
.PORTLAND CEMENT ASSOCIATION
Mezzanine—Placer Hotel, Helena, Mont.
Dept. F-110
A national organization to improve and extend the uses of concrete
Please send free booklet, ''Pave Your Barnyard With Concrete.
Atso send material on subjects I've listed:
h
NAME.
ST. OR R. NO.
-CITY.
STATE.
When Writing to Advertisers, say
I Saw It in
ft
Montana Farmer-Stockman
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rStop irrigation failures with
\ Transite Pipe!
)
Q
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long lengths and light weight. Transite can be installed by
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disastrous system shutdowns, choose easy-to-install, main
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ers throughout the country. For full details write: HRHBlilBiil
AtmJfOTOM
*03
004 sro:
Johns-Manville s/w 1
Marketing agreements and federal
orders in several important fall crop
states will again limit market supplies
through size, quality and maturity re
strictions on shipments into consumer
channels and to food processors. Last
year these agreements covered about
70 per cent of the fall crop. State orders
covered a small additional amount,
Coverage probably will be much the
same this season.
Fortunately, per capita consumption
of potatoes seems to have halted its
long decline and turned up slightly be
Potato Prospect
Up to Last Year
I By GILBERT GVSLER
Market Analyst
POTATO MARKET PROSPECTS look
about as good as last season. The crop
is larger than in 1959, but demand may
increase about as much as the supply.
Prices should average about as high,
but probably will rise less during fall
and winter than last season.
The September estimate of the crpp
was 253.1 million cwt., up 9.8 million
cwt. from 1959. Part of the increase has
already been used. 3«rnmer and fall
crops that will "supply the market
through the- next six months are ex
pected -to turn out 218.5 million cwt.
against 212.6 million cwt. last year.
Heat and drought in early September
may have cut the crop below the fore
cast in some areas. Whether fall weath
er will add to the damage or repair part
of it remains to be seen.
Crop Exceeds Recommendations
The crop is bigger than the U.S. De
partment of Agriculture recommended
in its acreage-marketing guide as the
amount that would satisfy all require
ments. The guide called for total plant
ing of 1,341,050 acres which, with
projected yields, would have produced
238 million cwt.
Actual planting was about 93,000
acres more and the total crop promises
to be about 15 million cwt. more than
the guide. The excess acreage was in
the summer and fall crops. The guide
called for an outturn of 207 million cwt.
from these crops, or 11.5 million cwt.
less than the predicted harvest.
Marketing Agreements
X JUST PASSED ED
WARD'S PLACE--HE > HELP?
SURE MAS As
LOT OF HIRED
HELP THIS YEARÎ
HIRED
HE TURNED HIS
FARM INTO A
REST HOME [
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THEY'RE
GUESTS,
WISBY'
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HE CALLS THE CHORES
PHYSICAL THERAPY.'' AND
GUESTS PAY HIM S50**
A WEEK TO PO THEM »
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fill
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cause of growing use of processed forms.
With population increasing over three
million persons a year, total use is ris
ing slightly.
The Department of Agriculture fig
ures total needs at satisfactory prices
at 238 million cwt. for this crop year
against 233 million cwt. for the 1959-60
season. Its percentage estimates of
actual utilization of the 243-million
bushel 1959 crop are: Table stock, 58.7;
food processing, 16.5; starch and flour,
3.2; sale for livestock feed and seed,
8.4; food, feed, seed and shrinkage on
-r. farms where grown, 13.2.
More Processing
Around 40 million cwt. went to
processing plants other than starch and
flour, chiefly for chips and cU ^e d
frozen potato products. Usage v m this
form was up about 6 million cwt. from
the 1958 crop year and is almost Cer
tain to be greater this season. Demand
from starch and flour plants and live
stock feeders for off grades and sizes
withheld from consumer channels under
marketing agreements probably will be
much the same as last season.
Prices for the 1960 crop thus far
have averaged substantially higher than
in 1959. The last crop cleaned up rather
early. Winter and early spring crops
were light and weather delayed part of
the large late spring crop, but over
lapping did not prove serious. Most of
the early summer crop was out of the
way by early September.
Higher Fall Prices
Last year the average price received
by farmers for potatoes advanced from
$1.59 a cwt. in October, the season's
low, to $2.65 in March" and $3.15 in April,
For the 1959 crop, the average was
$2.27 a cwt. This year's August average
price was $2.25. Early fall prices prob
ably will not go as low as a year ago.
Growers are likely to hold more off the
fall market in hope of a repetition of
last season's price rise. If they do,
prices are likely to advance less than
last season unless disaster hits winter
and early spring crops.
To this observer it seems best to sell
at least a normal proportion of the late
crop at harvest. Gains from storing are
likely to be substantially less than last
season. Keep pushing sales on price up
thrusts through fall and winter. Hold
back when markets slump.
and

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