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Montana farmer-stockman. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1947-1993, October 01, 1960, Image 6

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075096/1960-10-01/ed-1/seq-6/

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WASHINGTON, I). C—Another step
toward revision of Federal beef grades
comes up on Nov. 11.
Americas National Cattlemen's
Association has scheduled an im
portant meeting on that date in
Kansas City. Invited to attend are
representatives of all segments of
the beef Industry and the Agricul
tare department.
The beef leaders will discuss USDA
proposals for changes in grading prac
tice« which have been quietly circulat
' ing through the industry for study for
more than a year. The heart of the
new suggestions is the thought that con
sumers want less fat in top grades.
The last revision of Federal beef
grades was a decade ago, and there
have been a lot of changes since then
in the average consumer's attitude to
ward foods and fats. The Kansas City
meeting may well produce some in
dustry recommendations to back up
USDA's suggestions for grading
changes.
ALLOTMENT PROTECTION
A new law now offers acreage
history protection for folks who
have land under Conservation Re
serve or Great Plains Program
contracts.
In the past, the acreage allotment
planting history on lands under con
tract in these programs was protected
only for the life of the contract. After
that, failure to use the allotments could
have led to cuts in future allotments.
The new law gives absolute protec
tion of allotment history for double the
period of the contract. In other words,
if you have wheat allotment land under
a 5-year CR contract, the allotment
history is now protected for 10 years
from the beginning of the contract.
i
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October 1 to 18
By OSCAR L. MOLDENHAVER
A WIDE VARIETY of weather is indicated for Montana and northern
Wyoming during this forecast period. Three moderate storm periods are
likely to release beneficial amounts of rain .and possibly snow over prac
tically all of this region. Storm-precipitation activity should take a notice
able upturn between October 10 and 20 but may drop off temporarily there
after for the remainder of the month. Excessive cold, wet and stormy
weather will return early in November, however, and give the northern
Plains and Rocky Mountain states an early taste of winter.
Livestock growers and farmers will be wise to prepare for some ad
verse weather a little earlier this year than usual. There is a good chance of
OCTOBER PRECIPITATION - TEMPERATURE MAP
7
North Central
MONTANA
Northeastern
Western Division^
1.691&L u . ,
1.60 Jf* A T *
Hat. 44. 8 ° A Ut - 45°
t A T. 430 U - N.J- r "k
R P.
0.66
0.75
45.7°
t p.
R P.
0.69
0.65
N. A. T. 45.9°
EAT. 46°
RP.
I
E P.
E P.
rO'
Central
y
0.90
0.95
N. A T. 46.2°
N. P.
E P.
Southeastern
EAT. 45° N. P. 0.93
\j T W* °; 9 °
N. P. 1.13 VN. A T. 47.8 W
) E P. 1.20 A- T. 48°
H RAT. 47.9° I
E A. T. 47 Ô ^3
\
Southwestern
. N.P. 0.99
. t P. 1.00
r RAT. 43.4°
V. E AT. 43°
^C^H ^
X
WYOMING
A
^"'Drainage
N.P. 1.03
EP. 1.00
/MAT. 47.3°
.X*x
LEGEND
IL P.—Normal
precipitation.
E. P.—Expected
precipitation.
1.08
1.10
N.AT. 44.8°
O EAT. 45°
R P.
> E P.
West
r*
ef
48°
Divide
N-P. 1 ,3©v d.
EP. 1,26 Fw
N.AT.41.4%
AT. 42* X
R P.
1 o09
lo00 Ä
RAT, 46.1°
P Pra in og e EAT. 46®
average
E. A. T.—Expe c ted
average temp era
E P.
Keeping in Touch With Washington
Federal Beef Grade
Changes on Docket
SIMILAR SOLUTIONS
Vice President Nixon's campaign
proposal to turn surplus grains into
^ meat, milk, and eggs for donation
to needy people underlines the slm- '
llarity between Democratic and
Republican promises in the food
use field.
Differences between the aims of the
two parties on price supports and pro
duction controls are considerable. But
when it comes to methods of disposing
of the surpluses we already have,
there's a remarkable similarity.
In brief, the GOP presidential nomi
nee now says be is for an expanded
Food-for-Peace program, creation of a
series of emergency food stockpiles
near major population centers, an ex
panded "payment-in-kind" land retire
ment program, and "urgent study" of
plans for converting surplus grain into
protein foods for gifts to the needy at
home and abroad.
The Democrats use slightly different
language and don't put quite as much
emphasis on land retirement, but in
general they've endorsed the same food
disposal methods Nixon is now advo
cating. Some Democrats, in fact, are
complaining loudly that Nixon is try
ing to run on a Democratic platform in
these particular fields.
Most interesting of the Nixon pro
posals is the suggestion that grain sur
pluses be whittled away by converting
them into protein foods which the gov
ernment would buy up for giveaway
programs. If carried out on a large
scale, this could be tremendously ex
pensive. But unless the government
were willing to sink large sums into
the program, most livestock producers
might not be willing to expand too far
for fear of collapsing prices.
GOOD-WILL BUILDER
Agriculture Secretary Ezra T.
Benson will probably make himself
pretty scarce around Washington
after the November elections.
Benson, the travclingest man in the
cabinet, plans another set of far-and
wide tours after the political campaigns
are over. Probable destinations include
Latin America and Some Pacific and
Asian areas.
These trips, like past Benson tours,
will be billed as a combination of good
will promotion and visits to step up
overseas sales of American farm
products.
STILBESTROL IN RATS
Another warning flag about fu
ture scientific probing into the use
of stilbestrol in livestock feeds was
hoisted In New York recently.
A Kansas biochemist. Prof. Anthony
W. Gawienowski, reported to the
American Chemical Society that he
had injected stilbestrol into the hind
leg muscles of young rats. When the
rats were slaughtered, he found traces
of stilbestrol
breakdown products
in the body tissues of the rats.
There appears to be no need to fear
that this lone experimental report
9?
44
light snow in some of the farming regions of this forecast area around
October 12-13 and 18-19. November, of course, is expected to have the peak
of autumn storm activity and may have frequent storms and cold spells
during the month.
Four cool spells, some quite vigorous, are indicated to cover this region
during this forecast period. There will be a few brief periods of slightly
weather, too, but warm days will be scarcer than usual through
warm
October 25. The lowest temperatures of the month are expected between
October 13 and 25.
Precipitation: Normal or above.
Temperatures: Average below normal.
These miniature weather maps are designed to give you a quick, easy-to
read forecast of approximately when certain kinds of weather may occur,
but the actual occurrence may be occasionally as much as two or three days
early or late. With these variations, the map forecast should prove correct
at least three times out of four.
MHOCÏ 7
S VERY COOL
JUE OCT 4
LQ N OCT 3
ss
1?
VERY COOL
TRY COOL
:•
.VERY
\COOL
£:
:ry cool
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y.
V
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m oci 7
THU OCT 6
AI OCT a
Q
COOL
COOL
WARM
WARMER
A*
J.
ARMER
WARM
COOL
A
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IUL
sm
n
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MOD..
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tMER
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■W OCT 13
JK *
VLy^lYCOOL
%
ARM
fBI OCT 14 .
^ SLIGHTLY
COLD
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u
&
iC.
%
WARMER
c
!Y COOI
ARMER
. V*
LEGEND
m
El
$h«w.rv m eiw rt at
Major dorm;
o
sporty pr ociprt stieo.
ita4ptaopdtttoe.
Snowstorm; m o doroto
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p/v nf ? flatten.
FT
■mm

A&J activity; wkiaipffMl.
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threatens the use of stilbestrol In live
stock. Government officials have told
ns that stilbestrol is still approved for
feeding because under present practices
the hormone-like substance—which can
cause cancer in some lab animals—
leaves NO residue in beef as far as sci
entists have been able to discover. Prof.
Gawienowski, however, says his ex
periments apparently reopen this ques
tion for further study.
It has been pointed out, incidentally,
that the method the Kansan used in
hiSr -experiment was entirely different
"from the methods used to give stilbes
trol to food animals. His dosages, for
instance, were 100 times as great as
the dosages used in beef cattle and the
method of administering the hormone
was entirely different.
bon
ci
STUDY SUGAR SOURCES
USDA sugar officials were quietly
to to work study
preparing go
of considerable importance to all
sugar beet growers—and to would
be growers who are plugging hard
for expanded beet acreage.
The House Agriculture Committee,
which will write another new sugar
hill next year, has asked USDA for a
factual report on what sugar supplies
are available. The committee wants
a rundown on how much sugar can be
obtained in the future, both from for
eign sources and expanded domestic
production.
It's believed the report will show that
domestic beet production can be ex
panded about 10 per cent with present
processing facilities. Further expan
sion would depend on congressional
guarantees of extra acreage over a
fairly long period so as to encourage
private investors to build additional
processing plants.

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