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Montana farmer-stockman. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1947-1993, October 01, 1960, Image 9

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075096/1960-10-01/ed-1/seq-9/

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Research And
Field Notes
By
RON E. ROSS
Office of
Information
Montana
State College
THE FOLLOWING item was taken
from the U.S. Forest Service's North
ern Region News. The News editor, in
turn, got it from Forest Ranger E.
DelMar Jacquish's column in the West
ern News, Libby. And it is well worth
repeating
Wish you were here .
This is probably the most worn out
summer time phrase in America. Nev
» I
14
ertheless I wished that you were with
me when I rode to a small forest fire
a few days ago. The fire was at Lower
Cedar Lake in the Cabinet Wild Area.
It was not a large fire, as fires go,
but it left a black acre scar on the
shore of a lovely high country lake.
The fire had spread from a campfire
left by some careless camper. When
the fire was controlled, I rode on up
the trail to look for a lead on the care
less camper.
Again I wished that you were there.
It is a beautiful ride by lakes and
waterfalls, through timber and moun
tains. Beautiful except for beer and
pop cans along the trail, paper plates
and garbage at camp sites, and fish
entrails and refuse in drinking springs.
The cry in America is to protect
wilderness by law. Protection by law
has its place but the law alone is not
the answer. The natural wonders of
our Cabinet Wild Area or any other
wilderness must be provided by you
—the people that use them. No pro
tective law can relieve the responsibili
ty of the individual to be careful and
clean in the woods.
Wish you were here—for a beauti
ful America.
14
»•
The man in the picture elsewhere
in this column is not tending a county
jail, as much as it may look that way.
He's Thelmar Mosdal, Broadview, and
he's standing beside his new double
decker farrowing pens, which he built
himself a couple years ago. Thelmar
figures that with the 12-unit setup,
he'll be able to farrow about 1,150
pigs per year* with 144 sows. He plans
to farrow three groups of Berkshire,
Montana's No. Is and Hamp crosses,
and market 3-4 times a year when
prices are high.
Thelmar's 415 wheat allotment is his
main farming operation, but he started
raising hogs to supplement his income.
He built the farrowing sheds and build
ing in 1958 at a cost of about $2,500,
about half of what it would have cost
commercially. And the farrowing crate
system, efficient enough that watering,
feeding and cleaning are automatic is
fast paying for itself. "Without this
type of setup," Thelmar says, 'T
couldn't handle both the crops and
hogs." And he figures he'll gross about
$45-50,000 a year when he gets up to
' around 75 sows.
He's feeding a ration composed of
20 pounds salt, 20 pounds di-calcium
phosphate, 20 pounds mono-sodium
phosphate/ 30 pounds soybean oil meal,
30 pounds tankage and 4 pounds ar
senilic acid to a ton of barley. Cost
is about $2.16 per cwL
m
I
■0
Thelmar Mosdal, Broadview, stands be
side his double-decker 12-unit farrow
ing set-up. He figures the pens will
handle a maximum 1,130 pigs from 144
sows when he goes into full production.
SAIT ROUNDUP LES1,E
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About Feeding Salt to Sheep
We are told that 80 per cent of the income from
farms is made using scientific discoveries. How
ever, one profit maker that hasn't changed since
the time of David is the feeding of salt to sheep.
Even here, our hard-working scientists have
uncovered the value of feeding salt to sheep by
special additives and new salt forms.
The Very Old and the Very New
An interesting contrast in time is the mixing of
the very new antibiotics in the long-proven and
used salt. Leslie Antibiotic Salt with Terramy
is designed for free choice feeding of your
sheep on the range or pasture. Not only does the
wide spectrum antibiotic increase the weight gains
made by your lambs but it also has been shown
in large scale feeding tests to lower death rates
from 4.3 per cent to 1.0 per cent. For 1,000 head
of sheep this means 33 extra lambs to market.
Our figures show that $600 spent for Leslie
Antibiotic Salt would bring back $1,600 in in
creased weight and lambs. .We would be glad to
send you our Fact Sheet on Antibiotic Salt for
Sheep. Just drop us a post card.
ein®
Salt Sheds?
You have sheep sheds, lambing sheds. Why not
salt sheds? Some months ago, we offered the cat
tlemen plans for salt feeding bins to keep their
loose salt and salt-mineral mixes protected from
the weather. While we don't think our plans will
win any prize for art work, we would be mighty
pleased to send you a free leaflet detailing a salt
feeding bin for sheep. The sketch shows this
salt bin which is
art easy-to-build
box with several
desirable features.
A divided trough
used for feeding
Leslie Salt with or
without additives
and mineral mix
tures slides for
ward for easy fill
ing and quick cleaning. The bin is low enough for
lambs to use but still provides enough headroom
LESLIE SALT
SPECIFICALLY FORMULATED FOR EVERY
WESTERN FEED SALT AND LIVESTOCK NEED!
Reclamation Assn.
To Meet at Helena
THE MONTANA RECLAMATION
Assn, will hold their 18th annual meet
ing Oct. 16, 17 and 18 at Helena.
Convention speakers include William
E. Welsh, secretary-treasurer. National
Reclamation Assn., Washington, D.C.,
who will speak on "Washington Office
Activities."
Reclamation's Challenge
in Montana" is the title of an address
• .
to be given by Bruce Johnson, Regional
Director, Region 6, Bureau of Recla
mation, Billings.
William Rossiter, president, Helena
Valley Irrigation District, will review
the history of the Helena Valley unit.
Walt Mauritson, Flathead county ex
tension agent, will discuss the "Soil
Fertility Program in Flathead Coun
ty " Norman Blevins, executive secre
tary, Montana Hardware Dealers Assn.,
(2' 8" minimum) for the larger sheep. The feed
ing trough has rounded edges to protect the fleece.
The roofing made of either metal or shingles
protects salt from wind and rain and the sides are
well-braced for long term wear. You'll find the
skids make it easy for you to move it from one
area to another. Sizes will vary with your needs,
of course. The one sketched here can be made any
where from 2*4' to 4' long.
Sheepmen Are a Bag's Best Friend
Burlap bags are pretty much a thing of the past
for salt packaging — except for sheepmen. One of
our last big uses for the burlap bag is the 50 pound
burlap bags to be packed to the summer grazing
herds. Most sheepmen know that the sheep much
prefer loose salt. Sheep will wear their teeth down
and rub their tongues raw on salt blocks so it's
worth that extra effort to get loose salt to them.
Besides, those burlap bags can always be used to
bed down the dogs or wipe out the skillet — (not
necessarily in that order, however).
This Is Your Commercial!
The Leslie Salt Co. is very proud to work with
your American Sheep Producers Council in pro
moting the use of
lamb with the all im
portant housewife
purchaser. Leslie's
many salesmen will
soon be decorating
7,500 Western gro
cery stores with ex
tremely attractive
Lamb - O - Rama
banners showing what a tasty dish lamb can b£.
Keep your eyes peeled for them. We hope yd*i
will agree that they will sell lamb. __ ^
Write Me Anytime
If your feed dealer is unable to tell you all you
want to know about the feeding of salt and anti
biotics or about any use of salt, drop a line to me
at Leslie Salt Co., 505 Beach St., San Francisco
11, California.
Remember, look for your product as featured in
Lamb-O-Rama. We'll
see you at the meat
«counter.
lA
IÄ]
3S&
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**
3
Helena, will speak on "Our Associa
tion's Interest in Reclamation."
Guest speaker at the banquet ses
sion will be LaSalle Coles, president.
National Reclamation Assn., Prine
ville, Ore.
Two panel discussions will be pre
sented. "Considerations in Financing
Irrigated Farm Operations" will be
discussed by bank representatives
Charles W. Moore, Great Falls; Bud
Nelson, Sidney, and Eugene Coombs.
Billings. Moderator will be Richard D.
Rubie, Havre.
N. A. Jacobsen, extension livestock
specialist, Montana State College, will
moderate a discussion on "Livestock
Feeding." Panel members will be Rob
ert Lenhardt, Billings; Blake Tippetts,
Fort Shaw, and Henry S. Hibbard,
Helena.
The convention will conclude with a
tour of the Helena Valley Project, coo
ducted by Bureau of Reclamation
personnel.

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