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Montana farmer-stockman. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1947-1993, December 15, 1961, Image 12

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075096/1961-12-15/ed-1/seq-12/

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Magic
Il 1
Gift
m
tj
Since the first Christmas Day heal
ing has been the greatest gift of all—
a miraculous and heartfelt thing that
only the sick can really appreciate.
Today drugs, skill and science aid
in healing, but still the truly magic
ingredients are understanding and
love, the kind you have helped us
give our boys and girls.
Your love endures forever in a bequest to
Montana Children's Home
and Hospital
Shodair Crippled Children's Hospital
840 Helena Avenue, Helena, Montana
It'*
YOU PAY LESS MONEY
a fact!
For
CAPP-HOMES CONSISTENTLY OUTSELL
ALL OTHERS IN THE NORTHWEST BE- *
CAUSE OF LOWER COST FINANCING '
HIGHEST QUALITY AND BETTER SERVICE '
Here's what you get with the
Capp-Home Purchase Plan
• low monthly payments!
• Your own home mortgage free
and clear in less than 10 years!
• You tan refinance or pay up
anytime without penalty!
• Plumbing, heating, cabinets and
electricity with fixtures!
• Credit-Life insurance!
•_ -
100's
THE MONTEREY 26 » 46 '
CASH PRICE $«789
ONLY $71 per month
delivered and erected with all fin
ishing materials tor inside and out.
KITCHCN
DINING
li a'-r*«s'-o* r-e*xir-e*
SED ROOM
ir-i'* ii'-e*

OF OTHER j
PLANS
OR USE
YOUR OWN 1
CL
•ATH
CL
NALL
ONLY $95 per month
living room
«i'-rx ts'-s*
BCD ROOM ISCOROOMP
ir-t'xir-r I r-o'xio '-JT
inc
iing complete plumbing, heat
electrieai with fixtures and
ing
cabinets.
Matty Capp-Homes have bean financed by the
Form Hem* Lean Administration & Federal Land Banks
Contact us or your local representative
CAPP-HOMES, 1143 Dupont Ave. N..
Minneapolis II, Minn. Dept. 55.
$3989
PRICES FROM
t WESTERN MONTANA—Ed Sincavare,
■ 823 4th Ave. SW., Conrad, Phone CR 8-3104
■ EASTERN MONTANA—Warren Bloomdahl,
814 1st St. W., Roundup, Phone 347
*
Christmas Spirit
(Continued From Page 4)
gaver and his piping baby voice
drummed on Ma's heart like a small
invisible hammer from the edge of
the crowd as he was dragged away—
an I be'n a good lit-ta boy.
He was earnestness and innocence
combined; and for the moment he stole
the show.
There was a smile on Ma's lips
and a lump in her throat. The moment
passed, but the message lingered—
echoed—and mingled with the night.
Ma felt a mittened hand in hers. It
was the brown eyed moppet, stars and
all. The other mitten clutched her
treasured gift from Santa.
AN AGED MAN, who Ma knew lived
alone, stepped in front of her.
The Christmas Spirit is certainly
with us this night, Mrs. Robison," said
he. "A fine thing it is for the young
ones!" His cheeks and ears were red
from the frosty air and his old eyes
shone with the un-accustomed excite
ment.
9 9
4 4
* •
Yes—uh yes—Merry Christmas Mr.
Barker," she tried to match his conver
sational mood. But the words were
barely spoken when the thought oc
curred: how could he be merry, this
solitary old soul in his humble cabin?
But he glowed, as though she had
just handed him a gift. "Thank ye
Ma'm he smiled, "and may the Good
Lord bring the same to you." Then he
shuffled busily away, as though to
absorb enough merriment to sustain
i i
him to the end of the season.
The crowd had divided into little visit
ing groups; and these in turn, began
to move toward the warmth of their
cars.
"Merry Christmas" rang out from all
directions, and became lost in the roar
of exhausts. Mary Ann handed over
her other two youngsters saying, "They
want to ride home with Grandma.
SHE AND THE three tykes went to
warm their hands at the dying bon
fire.
99
"Grandma," piped the brown eyed
one.
What dear?
Did you see the 'Kwissmus 'Pirit?
Ma was somewhat taken a-back.
Why a—yes dear—yes I did.
"What did it look like?" persisted the
moppet.
Well," Ma thought hard and fast, the
events of the evening passing in review
before her.
6 4
99
< i
9 99
i «
9 9
4 4
Well," she began again,
< 4
sometimes
it looks like a very small girl with
a
stars in her eyes.
"Like me?
99
99
"Like you," affirmed Ma.
And sometimes it looks like Grand
pa, or Mike, or Bernadine—or even an
old-old man," she finished.
It was true as she knew how to make
it. Each was a symbol of Christmas,
the spirit was little boys and girls,
youth and age, friendship, and doing in
his name, for those we love.
I hope I see the Kwissmus 'Pirit
sometime,
I hope,
the embers.
All abo-a-r-d!
from Pa.
OHMYSTARS!" Ma came out of her
reverie, gathered her grand-babies and
headed for the Robison sedan.
Pa flipped the lines over the horses*
backs and headed back to the Robison
ranch.
He had discarded the mask, and
under the rakish red cap his face wore
a grin of honest pleasure, for he had
exchanged his pack of sweets for a
cargo of happy youngsters hitching a
ride—their first in Santa's sleigh.
4 t
ii
9 9
said the dreamy child,
answered Ma, staring into
that you never lose it.
It was a bellow
« 4
9 9
4 4
99
4 4
99
4 4
Little Lifts
In Living
by EMELINE
OUR LITTLE DEBBIE keeps busy
these days wearing out the Christmas
catalogs. Old Santa will probably have -
one hard time filling her order. Every
day she picks out a different doll.
♦ • •
Two times we were wakened in the
night by the brassy sounds from a
radio up-stairs—our son's radio. Going
up to shut it off, or just listening to the
blare, sleep is gone for sure. Tonight as
went wearily to bed, Billie's dad
layed down the law. "If that radio isn't
shut off, and wakes me just once more,
it is going down the basement and it is
going to stay there!" "Well," our son
replied in an injured tone, "Since you
put it that way, IT! shut it off about
nine or nine-thirty.
• ♦ •
GetHrg 'Debbie out of mischief is
almost a full time job. I can't always
da?h off to see where she is, so I call
to her saying,
demg?
povest little off-hand tone, "Anything!
Yes, it is ANYTHING, that's for sure.
we
Debbie, what are you
Invariably she answers in the
44
99
99
D-ar Joyce: Now you know. Santa
Claus is make believe. Your discovery
affected me more than it did you. Hav
ing known your imaginary friends
"Shevie" and "Maldo," it was an easy
transition slipning away from the Santa
Claus myth. It was another milestone
for me, and passing milestones are al
wavs just a little sad. Adults have fun
"laying the Santa Claus game. My deep
est happiness though, comes from the
sure knowledge that you know the
Christ of Christmas and his Love and
Kindness, is not make believe, but
real and ever lasting. May His Love
and Kindness reign forever in your
heart. Love, Mama.
• • •
Your daughter was so sweet and ,
dignified at the 4-H meeting!" My moth
erly heart warmed at the compliment,
but my mind had a different picture,
a picture of our dignified daughter brac
ing her foot against a wall as two of
her dignified friends tried to push her
out of bed! So what wall can withstand
three determined sweet seventeeners?
So it caved in a big gapping hole. Ah,
sweet dignity, where art thou? Well, of
course, they'd hung it up for the night!
• • •
< <
Poison is pretty potent stuff. We
adults label it and treat it with the
deference due it. Have you ever thought
that poison comes in word form too?
People that consciously or unconscious
ly plant seeds of suspicion about others
are certainly dealing in poison. A few
words can churn around in the mind
and stir up enough disturbance to wreck
homes and alter lives. Perhaps a few
imaginary shelves in our minds would
help, A place to lay away and forget
the poisoned words we have had handed
to us, or those we might be tempted to
hand out ourselves.
• • ♦
Arlene was a candidate for queen
last month for Homecoming, and for
the Harvest Ball. Of the four candidates
for each, she made it for one, and
one of her friends made it for the
other, so she was very happy. Of course
you know what happened. With some
crowns I made for my Sunday School
class, plus a couple of old curtains,
Joyce and Debbie were all set. We've
had two little queens around here «ver
since.

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