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Montana farmer-stockman. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1947-1993, December 15, 1961, Image 17

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075096/1961-12-15/ed-1/seq-17/

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MiuWf OuUook
By RAY REIMAN
AVERAGE PRICES received by the
nation's farmers during the month just
past dipped slightly below October and
below November, 1960. At 238 per cent
of the 1910-14 average, the November
price index was three points under a
year earlier.
The all-crop price index of 223 weak
ened from October but held at four
points above last fall. While the over
all year-to-year difference was the re
sult of a downturn in the livestock and
product index, the real break came in
dairy, poultry and eggs, which are in
cluded in the livestock and product
category.
\
The index of prices paid by farmers,
meanwhile, remained at 301 for the
fourth straight month. It's the highest
November index on record, standing at
about 1 per cent above a year earlier.
BEEF CATTLE—Outlook for the win
ter and spring looks more "normal
than it has for some time. With top
quality making up a smaller share of
the winter-spring total than a year ago,
„and weights due to average lighter,
price spreads will widen and heavy
animals will suffer less price discrimi
nation. It creates the incentive to put
on more finish during winter.
Try to have steers cleaned out before
spring, however. Even though prices
won't dip nearly as sharp as a year
earlier, the expected weakness plus
spiraling feed costs on heavy animals
may remove a big chunk of the profits.
After maintaining strong prices
throughout the big fall movement,
stockers and feeders won't likely ad
vance any more after December than
the slight gains of last year. With corn
costs up and the year-ahead slaughter
outlook similar to this year, feedlot
operators won't have much reason to
push spring feeder prices up either.
99
HOGS — Substantial price improve
ment is due shortly . . . carrying
through about the next 60 days or so.
Good chance February prices will reach
about $1.50 per cwt. above fall lows.
Marketings will soon shift to a summer
pig crop about the same size as last
in contrast to 10 per cent
year
slaughter increases through much of
the fall.
Strength won't likely be soon enough
or great enough to justify holding back
hogs now much above 200 lbs. With
lard very plentiful, overfat hogs will
continue to be discriminated against
during weeks just ahead. Plan to carry
current lightweights up to 230-240 lbs.
during early months of 1962.
ACTUAL vs. PARITY PRICES
Comparison of U.S. average prices received by farmers on Nov. 15, 1961, with parity
Ices, as reported by U.S. Department of Agriculture:
Actual
Parity As
Farm % of
Price Parity
$21.30
23.70
26.20
25.20
Average
Farm
Price
$15.70
19.90
23.70
15.10
74
Hogs per cwt. .
Beef cattle, per cwt. ...
Calves, per cwt. .
Lambs, per cwt. ..
Wool, per lb. .
Butterfat, per lb. .
Milk, wholesale, per cwt. . , .
Chickens, live, per lb..
Turkeys, live, per lb. .
Eggs, per doz. ..
Wheat, per bu. .
Corn, per bu. .
Rye, per bu. .. ..
Oats, per bu. .
Barley, per bu. ....
Hay, baled, per ton .. .
Flaxseed, per bu...
Potatoes, per cwt. ..
Apples, per bu. ..
Beans, dry edible, per cwt. .
Average farm price adjusted for seasonal variations:
Milk, wholesale, per cwt
Eggs, per doz.
84
90
6U
54
.405
.749
81
607
.749
5.12
80
4.53
46
.116
.251
.346
53
.184
.36
.47
70
79
1.87
2.38
1.62
38
.94
71
1.05
1.47
.84
77
.64
1.00
1.25
80
20.50
25.30
81
3.12
3.79
82
1.24
2.45
SI
84
2.27
2.69
9.00
82
7.39
4.08
.327
*
Outlook at a Glance
FARM PRICES—Averaging slightly
below last year.
BEEF CATTLE — More "normal"
outlook for winter-spring; less price
discrimination against heavy steers.
HOGS—Substantial price improve
ment is due shortly.
LAMBS — Fall feeder shipments off
more than 10%.
WHEAT — Little profit to be gained
by holding most classes.
RYE—Sell now, unless you want to
defer income into 1962.
FEED GRAINS — Corn strength may
be long coming; oats and barley are
well "overpriced" as feeds.
HAY—Quality hay prices will likely
advance.
DAIRY — Off-season chick hatch is
up 30%.
POULTRY — Consumers will resist
mutch broiler strength; huge frozen
stocks to weigh on turkey prices.
POTATOES — Diversion payments
drop 20 cents after Dec. 31.
LAMBS—Shipments of feeders into
North Central States have been off
much more from last fall than the 6
per cent cutback in number on feed
Nov. 1. It indicates total feeding op
erations may be down 10 per cent or
more.
Lighter marketings from fed crop,
plus a marked shift from last winter
spring's liquidation to a firm holding
attitute, paves way for about $3-plus
gains during the next three to five
months.
WHEAT—Strength since harvest has
been aided by rapid export pace and
tight farmer holding. But prices at
some points have worked up to levels
permitting CCC to move out stocks.
And exports aren't expected to keep
up the price of recent months. Except
possibly on quality soft wheat, profit
able gains for further holding are be
coming highly doubtful.
FEED GRAINS—The administration
appears determined to keep the pres
sure on corn and sorghum prices
throughout the winter. And CCC has
ample supplies (and authority) with
which to do it: about a Kblf billion bush
els of "certificate" corn plus any that
might be going "out of condition." Dur
ing late spring and summer, market
should work closer to loan levels. It
means corn must be of safe moisture
and in good storage to return a hold
ing profit.
While oats and barley supplies are
down, prices will likely move up little
so long as corn doesn't show much
gain. They're already overpriced In
terms of feeding value, when compared
with corn. If you need feed, sell small
grains and replace with corn unless
transportation costs eat up the advant
age.
HAY—For the country as a whole,
hay prices aren't averaging any higher
than last fall. The over-all supply is
ample, and even drought-stricken areas
have generally moved in about enough
total forage to carry them through the
winter. It's still best to buy now if
you need winter supplies—prices on
quality hay are still due to advance
several dollars a ton.
DAIRY — Milk prices will probably
work lower through the winter and
spring under the pressure of seasonally
increasing supplies. Class I milk prices
are due to show the greatest year-to
year spread.
With returns being squeezed further,
culling the money-losers with a sound
production-testing program is becom
ing even more important. Market the
boarders before prices weaken sharply
by late summer and fall.
EGGS—The higher average rate of
lay will keep production up and prices
sagging through most of the winter and
spring. In addition to the current flock,
the July-November egg-type chick
hatch was up 30 per cent from last
year; increasing supplies from these
3k**
-7a
HIGGINS BROS
HEREFORDS
RINGLING. MONTANA
t.
BULLS A FEMALES FOR SALE
Phone 5201 or 5202
White Sulphur Springs
Bill Higgins Cow Herd
Eldon King, Herdsman
FOR SALE
14 Yearling Bulls
30 Bull Calves
Some Heifer Calves
MOREHEAD HEREFORDS
Phone DA 7-2481
E. D, Morehead, Jr.
FISHTAIL, MANTANA
Larson Hereford Ranch
See the Calves by these top
herd sires: King Promise B3
and Domino Heir 107, Vis
itors always welcome.
LOWRY LARSON
Phone INgersoll 6-2255
Bynum. Mont.
CHRIS JACOBSON
REG. HEREFORDS SUN RIVER, MONT.
1
Bull Calves for Sale
Phone AM 4-3231
'Specializing in the Cowman's Kind"
2T HEREFORD RANCH
Yearling Bulls
MUNGAS BROS.
Philipsburg, Montana
JENSEN BROS.
HEREFORDS

Quality I.P.R. Bulls For Sale
Real Prince A Zato Heir Breeding
Phone HU 5-2733
CIRCLE, MONTANA
Farming is a hazardous business. Guard
carefully against accident but protect your
self from loss by taking out a Montana
Farmer - Stockman SPECIAL ACCIDENT
INSURANCE POLICY Full information on
request.- Write Insurance Dept., Montana
Farmer-Stockman, Great Falls. Mont.
pullets in the spring may well offset the
expected strong demand by breakers.
POTATOES — Active processors and
liberal use of the diversion program,
especially in the West, are keeping this
year's price situation from being even
worse than it is. Without much winter
price recovery in sight, keep moving
spuds out gradually, making use of di
version program if it's offered in your
area.
drop from 60c to 40c per cwt. after
Dec. 31.
Note that diversion payments
Weather Summary
Mean Temperature and Total Precipitation
November, 1961
United States Department of Commerce
Weather Bureau Office, Helena, Montana
*
£
e
«
a
-
3
a
S
fi
f S
h L £ L ||
s g.1 « ||
O «S »>o 'S g g 1 «
S Ûfc H OZ
Billings . 31.2 —4.6 1.55 +0.87 13.30 +0.88
Butte 25.1 —3.1 0.36 —0.33 10.80
Glasgow . 27.6 —0.4 0.19 —0.33 8.73 —4.00
Great Falls 30.0 —5.2 1.49 + 0.82 10.18
Havre . 26.2 —4.7 0.22 —0.26 9.30
Helena . 27.8 —3.9 0.37 —0.27 7.63 —3.06
Kalispell 26.6 —5.4 1.07 —0.48 14.20 —0.61
Miles City . 30.0 —3.0 0.56 + 0.07 9.96 —2.37
27.1 —4.8 1.38 + 0.27 13.12 +1.19
Boz, (St. Col.) . . • • 1.10 + 0.03 15.87 —0.84
• 0.56 —0.05 12.33 —1,25
• 0.04 + 0.08 10.87 —0.20
• 0.11 —0.27 9.11 +0.24
• 0.19 —0.17 12.42 —0.36
• 0.50 —0.21 13.15 —3.00
• 0.12 —0.23 8.69 —3.32
Medicine Lake . * • Tr. —0.38 10.34 —1.97
•—Temperature data not available at press
time.
S
■u
!S
». S J» B
s. I s I
s
0
1.26
3.15
.62
Missoula
Broadus
Cut Bank
Dillon
jrlendive
Lewistown
Malta
Prescott HI erefords
BELGRADE, MONTANA
"Where . Buyers . Repeat
and . Become . Our . Friends
AMMEN
HEREFORD RANCH
Yearling Bulls for Sale
at the Ranch
GEORGE A. AMMEN
Fh. FB 9-4687
MONTANA
TURNER
HEREFORD
RANCH
LUND
RESERVE, MONTANA
Conformation Plus Gainability"
Member Montana Beef Performance Assn.
I
YEARLING BULLS
FOR SALE
English and Canadian Breeding
BEN G. PETERSEN
herefords
Telephone FRankiin 4-2297
BUFFALO,
MONTANA
GOLDENSTEIN BROS
YOUR VISITS TO THE RANCH
ALWAYS WELCOME
2 Miles on South 3rd, Route 2
BOZEMAN,
MONTANA
HEREFORDS
FRASER
Featuring Evan Mis
chief. Colorado Bald
win and Tex Regent
breeding.
REEDPOINT, MONTANA
Hereford
Ranch
BAYERS .
HEREFORD RANCH
• •
TWIN BRIDGES. MONTANA
Founded in 1918 Specializing in Low, Thick,
Heavy-Quartered Hereford^
MONTANA SHORTHORNS
The profit factor for your beef production.
Purebred Sale March 2-3, Billings.
Breeding Stock available. For current listings
contact:
MONTANA SHORTHORN ASSN.
Roy Gfeller, Sec.
Big Timber, Moat.

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