OCR Interpretation


Montana farmer-stockman. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1947-1993, December 15, 1961, Image 9

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075096/1961-12-15/ed-1/seq-9/

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THE USDA 1962 feed barley pro
gram is unusual in several respects
Due to the fact that premiums are
paid for malting barley, it was con
cluded that malting barley was not in
surplus and thus the grower of malting
barley should be encouraged to produce
more, not less, barley of malting
quality.
Three regulations under the program
are pertinent here. A producer of malt
ing barley is eligible for price support
on his 1962 crop without participating in
the 1962 feed grain program provided
he meets the following conditions;
1. Planted a malting barley variety
for commercial purposes in one of the
last five years in the 14 states desig
nated by the U. S. Department of Agri
culture.
2. Plants only acceptable malting
3. Does not plant a 1962 barley
acreage in excess of 110 per cent of
the farm's 1959-60 average barley acre
age.
The fourteen states designated are
California, Colorado, Idaho, Illinois,
Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana,
Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South
Dakota and Wisconsin. The 21 eligible
varieties are Atlas, Barbless, Betzes,
Forrest, Hanna, Haisa II, Hannchen,
Heines Hanna, Idaho Club, Kindred,
Manchuria, Montcalm, Moravian
O.A.C. 21, Oderbrusker, Odessa, Park
varieties in 1962.
The projected effect of the Feed Grain Program of the barley acreage in eight states. Averages for 1959-60
and percentage acreage is used as a base.
Per cent of total production and
planted acreage, avg. 1959-60
Malting Varieties
Per cent
Estimated 1962 acreage based on 1959-60 averages
Malting Varieties Feed Varieties
20 %
Decreased
Acreage**
Average
acreage—
all barley
North Dakota 3,811,000
Montana .1,936,500
California 1,739,500
987,000
Washington .... 710,500
Idaho
South Dakota .. 558,000
Oregon . 550,000
8-state total . 10,834,500
U.S. total .16,218,000
* This is assuming that malting barley producers can and will take advantage of the 20 per cent increase provision in
the 1962 barley program. These values could be larger as the grower need only to have grown a malting barley variety
in one of the last five years.
This is assuming that the average barley acreage reduction by farmers is 20 per cent.
Data compiled by the U.S.D.A. Marketing Service and cooperating state agencies served as a basis for the above calculations.
10 %
Increased*
Acreage
Net
Feed Varieties
Per cent
Increase or
Decrease
Acres
224,468
—244,967
—234,659
95,739
— 60,677
— 62,872
13,113
— 35,705
—305,606
State
Acres
Acres
3,288,893
474,442
377,472
977,130
271,411
151,760
415,710
247,500
6,204,318
86.3
522,107
1,462.058
1,362,028
9,870
439,089
390,240
142,290
302,500
4,630,182
13.7
328,889
47,444
37,747
97,713
27,141
15,176
41,571
24,750
620,431
—104,421
—292,412
—272,406
— 1,974
— 87,818
— 78,048
— 28,458
— 60,500
—926,037
24.5
75.5
21.7
78.3
Minnesota
99.0
1.0
* 38.2
61.5
.. .. 542,000
28.0
72.0
74.5
25.5
45.0
55.0
**
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Members of the Montana delegation to the 40th annual 4-H Club Congress at Chicago were, 1st row, left to right, Judy Lohr, Devon; Cliff Balzer, Worden;
Vangie Stenslie, Winifred; Boyd Iverson, Townsend; Gloria Boe, McLeod; Clarence Domire, Rudyard, and Linda Crow, Roberts. Second row, Jo Ann Staff,
Chinook; Caroline Hermes, Paradise; Charlotte Webb, Poison; Carolyn Gibson, Helena; Kathleen Holmes, Fishtail; Rose Swigart, Sidney, and Charlotte Klein.
Sunburst. Third row, Donna Undem, Terry; Sandra Fink, Forsyth; Shirley Minear, Paradise; Robert Banfill, Columbus; Eddie Green, Chester; Coral Powell,
Caldwell; Alice Pierce, Glendive and Gloria Spain, Bozeman. Fourth row, Ken Ross, Fergus county agent; Mrs. J. C. Wilson, Billings, past president of leaders
Assn.; John Baber, Miles City; Lloyd Petersen, Collings; Harlan McKechnie, Shelby; Larry McGill, Powderville; Mary Jane Stängel, 4-H home economics
specialist, and C. W. Vaughn, acting state 4-H leader. Three of the youths received national 4-H awards, Vangie Stenslie, for her project work in home beauti
fication; Robert Banfill, entomology, and Betty Medvit, home economics. Dorothy Spain, Bozeman, represented Montana in the National 4-H dress review.
1 1961 —9
Under Malting Exemption
Montana Takes Rap
In Barley Progra
II
By ROBERT F. ESL1CK*
land, Traill, White- Winter, Winter Club
and Winter Tennessee.
Barley Acreage
Utilizing data compiled by the USDA
marketing service and cooperating state
agencies, it is possible to calculate
what ma y happen to barley acreages
under certain assumptions. The tables
below presents one of such calculations
representing about two-thirds of the
total United States barley acreage.
Since varietal survey percentages were
available from only eight states, it
was possible to predict acreages for
only these eight states.
The second to fourth columns of the
table show the relative acreage planted
to feed varieties and malting varieties
in each state, based on the two year
average 1959-60. The total possible acre
* Professor of Agronomy. Montana State
College.
age that could be planted to malting
barley is probably much higher, as any
producer who grew a malting barley
variety .in any one of the past five
years is eligible as a malting barley
grower. He can qualify for supports by
shifting all of his acreage to a malting
barley variety.
The last column of the table shows
the net effect of the program, assuming
that those who have grown malting
barley the past two years will increase
their acreage by 10 per cent and those
who have grown feed barley will de
crease their acreage an average of 20
per cent.
Acreage Cutback
It. is interesting to note that if there
was an across-the-board reduction of
20 per cent, in barley acreage that the
total reduction for the 8-state area
would amount to 2,167,000 acres, where
as the malting barley feature results in
a net reduction of only 305,606 acres.
Since California is generally con
sidered a feed grain deficit area, the
question could be raised as to the
amount of compliance by California
producers, perhaps further reducing
this decrease.
If the values in the table were based
on bushels of barley rather than
age, the net effect of the program would
probably be even less because of the
generally higher yields in such states as
North Dakota and Minnesota
pared to Montana. Even in Montana,
the malting barley variety Betzes is
more generally raised under conditions
that result in higher yields than the
conditions under which the feed variety
Compana is raised.
Those who have grown malting bar
ley realize it is not wily the variety
grown, but also the quality of the
barley that will determine the malting
premium. Only 20 to 25 per cent of the
annual U.S. production is used by
maltsters and the remainder is used
feed.
Careful examination of the table, and
considerations previously set forth,
might lead one to believe that the net
effect of the program could be small on
total barley production but would
suits in a shift of feed barley produc
tion from Montana to North Dakota and
Minnesota.
acre
as corn
as
re
MGGA Joins National
Wheat Growers Assn.
THE MONTANA GRAIN Growers As
sociation was admitted to membership
in the National Association of Wheat
Growers at the national convention held
in Boise, Idaho, Dec. 6-8.
The convention was attended by a
delegation of 13 members of the MGGA
headed by Larry Erpelding, Forsyth,
president.
Headquartered in Washington, D. C.,
the National Association of Wheat
Growers is the legislative policy arm of
the grower groups and wheat commis
sions in the states of Idaho, Washing
ton, Oregon, Colorado, Oklahoma,
Texas, Wyoming, Kansas, Nebraska,
South Dakota, and now, Montaan.

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