OCR Interpretation


Montana farmer-stockman. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1947-1993, November 01, 1962, Image 11

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075096/1962-11-01/ed-1/seq-11/

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FARMING A RANCHING
NATIONAL RECORD for al
falfa hay production is now held
by Hancock and Son, Riverside
County, California — 16.2 tons
per acre in 10 cuttings. Average
protein content was 21.9 per
cent. Former record through
1960 was 12.3 tons per acre.
Hancocks applied $59.46 worth
of fertilizer per acre for an ex
tra return of $202.40 per acre,
Average production in the area
is 7 tons.
f
YOU CAN'T JUDGE a cow's
ability to produce milk and
cream on looks alone. Production
records tell the true story. The
University of Minnesota Agricul
tural Extension Service conducted
a 16-county contest where dairy
men attempted to judge a cow's
production ability from pictures.
Only six of the 4,953 dairymen
managed to place the animals
correctly. The Extension dairy
man says that from the laws of
chance, only one person in 720
should have placed all the cows
correctly. Also, most contestants
would have been farther ahead
to disregard the cow's looks and
simply guess at a top and bottom
animal. One out of every 10 con
testants placed the top producer
in the right place, and less than
one in 12 put the poorest ani
mal where she belonged.
WHILE MUCH AGRICUL
TURAL research has been con
ducted for the purpose of grow
ing agricultural products many
are developed for the specific
needs of the consumers. For ex
ample, seven out of every 10
crop varieties grown today were
unkown just 20 years ago. Many
of these were developed for a
specific use —and the consumer
—in mind. Most of our frozen
foods today are tailor-grown for
the consumer. New varieties of
peas, beans, sweet corn, straw
berries and other vegetables and
fruits are being sought that will
keep their farm-fresh flavor,
color and texture during freez
ing.
IN A RECENT study conduct
ed by the University of Illinois
farmers who were
concerning
forced to leave the farm it was
found that 27 out of the 200
interviewed had purchased self
propelled combines to harvest
less than 200 acres of beans and
small grain. It is estimated that
the break-even acreage at which
a farmer could own a self-pro
pelled combine or hire the work
done is 269 acres in Illinois. In
addition, over one-third of these
farmers had inadequate forms of
record keeping systems.
PIGS GAIN faster on less feed
if it is finely ground. This is in
dicated by tests conducted at
North Carolina State College.
Finely ground and coarse ground
feed was fed to pigs raised in
confinement and on pasture.
Those fed finely ground grain ate
about 7 per cent less feed per
pound of gain than those on
coarse feed. Pigs in confinement
gained faster than those on pas
ture but those on pasture ate 5
per cent less feed per pound of
gain, although it took them a
week longer to moke market
weight.
CATTLE MAKE better use of
protein if they are fed often, ac
cording to research at the Uni
versity of Wisconsin. Frequen
cies of two, four and eight times
a day were tested. It appeared
that when feedings are widely
separated, much of the protein
is lost in the urine. Animals ap
parently get more than they can
use at one time and have no
place to store it. When they get
feed in smaller doses, temporary
surpluses do not build up and less
protein is wasted.
BOOM SPRINKLERS reduce
labor 40 to 60 per cent as com
pared to conventional, hand
move types of irrigation systems,
University of Minnesota Institute
of Agriculture reports. With pro
per selection and design of noz
zles, the boom sprinkler is also
capable of giving good uniforrrl
Get Information On These New Lines From
Your PARKER MONTANA DEALER ... Or
Mail the Coupon.
ifftÄ
Miff .
%
GUlAl
''
HANSON
SNOW
BLOWER-PLOW
INTRODUCING
BOLENS
LAWN & GARDEN TRACTORS
an
- /*
Parker Montana Company is
pleased to announce their appoint
ment as distributor for the
famous Bolens line of outdoor
power equipment. Bolens pi
oneered the manufacturing of out
door power equipment, having
introduced the first garden trac
tor in 1919 ... 43 years of lead
ership backed by a promise of
quality.
y A
%
SS
m
The First Snow Blower-Plow at
A Sensible Pricef
I Rear mounted to provide easier removal of snow. Fits all
I standard 3-point hitches. Blows snow as far as 50' "
I either side. Cuts o 6' path of snow. Adjustable for height
with hydraulic system. Plus many other features for easy,
! efficient snow removal.
to
BOLENS HUSKY 800
Here is the newest of the compact lawn and garden tractors.
It's a real "power package" . . . big tractor power and per
formance at a small tractor price. Its compact styling, handy ,
controls and exclusive HUSKY "Fast Switch" system of
coupling and uncoupling attachments, make it a truly out
standing, useful, time and labor-saving unit around a farm
or ranch. Use it for lawn mowing, tilling, hauling, grading,
snow removal and many other chores.
THE HUSKY 800 features: the famous Wisconsin engine,
power-take-off driven attachments, plate clutch drive, speed
ranges from 3 /4 mph to 6 mph, and geared transmission and
controlled differential.
See a BOLENS demonstration and see how useful it can
be to you!
NEW IDEA >
125 BU.—PTO DRIVE
Manure Spreader
The new 202 PTO spreader is built to do a superior job of
shredding and a controlled, uniform pattern of spreading.
It's a new concept in paddle design. In addition, there ore
a new concept
12 more important improvements that make this spreader
the best buy. But get all the information. See your dealer
or write for Booklet No. 202.
NORTH AMERICAN
GRAIN-O-VATOR
I
HAULS small grains, corn
or feed.
UNLOADS
Vator for all grain or feed
handling jobs.
ELEVATES with auger ele
vator or blower.
MIXES feed or supplement
with feed while it elevates
or unloads.
TURBO-DOME
PISTONS
mm
Use Grain-O
ÛÉ
m
A
m
i :v
M&W TURBO-DOME PISTONS, with inverted tur
bulence chamber, greatly increase tractor per
formance and operating economy, Found m no
other piston at any price, the inverted turbulence
chamber concentrates firepower, squeezes every
ounce of power from every drop of fuel, increases
horsepower and saves fuel at the same time. Wear
of pistons, rings, connecting rods and crankshaft
bearings are radically reduced. When you consider
installing new pistons, consider M&W TURBO
DOME PISTONS!
•V
il
MIXING MODEL—85 Bu. Cap.
The Groin-O-Votor is specifically designed to handle oil small
grains, corn, ground feed, mash, pellets and other free flow
ing material'. Available in 85 or 1 25 bushel sizes. Eleven-inch
dia. elevators available in 7, 8 or 9 ft. lengths and will
unload up to 50 bu. per minute. Single or two-compartment
boxes.
MAIL THIS COUPON TO
BILLINGS, MONT.
PflflHtfl,
moimuifl
P.O. BOX 1798
a.
; *
Pleas« send Information on and the name of my dealer for: □ BOLENS Lawn A
Garden Tractors, □ OBAIN-O-VATOB. □ HANSON Snow Plow.
Manure Spreader, □ MAW Turbo-Dome Pistons.
□ NEW IDEA
NAME
WHOLCSALC
DISTRIBUTORS
ADDRESS»
ity of coverage. Savings appear
to make increased cost of boom
sprinkler system justified on
fields of 40 acres or more.
AN INEXPENSIVE hay wafer
ing machine which can process
hay at almost any moisture con
tent has been developed in Mich
igan. The machine was built
from parts of a baler by Mich
igan State University agricultur
al engineers. It is expected to be
on the market in about two years.
The machine is supposed to
make wafers from hay with a
moisture content of 65 per cent
without the use of an artificial
binding agent. Wafers are then
artificially dried with convention
al driers. Leaves are saved be
cause hay is at such high mois
ture content when they are
wafered.
INCREASES OF LAMB sales
up to 27 per cent have been
measured as a result of coopera
tive advertising programs and up
to 10 per cent as a result of gen
eral promotion, according to the
Economic Research Service of the
USDA. The study was made in
six metropolitan areas: Three in
the midwest, where lamb is a
slow seller, and three in the
Northwest where lamb is more
popular.
FARM PRODUCTION costs
today are about four times os
high as they were in 1940, ac
cording to USDA Research Serv
ice. About 70 per cent of a
farmer's gross income went to
pay for production costs in 1961,
compared to about 50 per cent
in 1940. In 1940 U.S. farmers
spent $1.75 on machinery and
buildings for every dollar spent
for hired help. By 1960 the ra
tio had risen to $2.77 to every
dollar for hired labor. In I960
property taxes were about 3.4
times higher than in 1940.

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