OCR Interpretation


Montana farmer-stockman. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1947-1993, November 01, 1962, Image 13

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075096/1962-11-01/ed-1/seq-13/

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We have the answer
to your
spreading problems
CZ
f
my
Cl
J
PRECISION
FERTILIZER
DISTRIBUTOR
AND SEEDER
wr
Now available in 3 models — 3-point hitch
P.T.O. driven as illustrated. Tow type
ground driven and Tow type P.T.O. driven.
Hopper capacity up to 1000 pounds. Do
your own "Bulk-Spreading" now and have
these plus features too!
• Speed — spreads up to 50 feet wide, does
25 acres an hour.
• Economy — adjustable pattern, wind control/
no waste.
• Versatility — one spreader for all your
needs — fertilizer, lime, seeds, pelletized
24D etc.
• Sound Investment — you get better crops
for less due to the amazing accuracy of the
LELY.
At Your Local Dealer or Contact:
MONTANA OLIVER
DISTRIBUTING COMPANY
Billings, Montana
P.O. Box 1358
MORE
POWER
FOR YOU WITH
[TIT.
A
! A
AMD POWER UNITS

IB
mt
m % !
There's a modern-designed Ford
Industrial Engine or complete
Power Unit that's built for your
job.
See Your Nearby Dealer, or Write
Rocky Mountain Distributor
The BRUHN CO.
1025 Broadway, Denver, Colo.
VACCINATE and BE SAFE!
V
ths peak of quality
COLORADO
Veterinary biologicals
Dependable Protection!
r^OLORADO brand Serums and Biologicals
have a trouble-free record for over a
quarter century in controlling livestock dis
eases. Produced under Government supervision.
VACCINES and SERUMS
for Cattle, Swine, Horses, Sheep, Turkeys
SEN*
MOW
Local Dealrtf Nation Wide Distribution
COLORADO SERUMCO. JS
4,50 VOLK STREET • DENVER UCOIO. ORTAOO
When you advertise in MONTANA
FARMER-STOCKMAN you reach more
than 35,000 farm families.
ing into the manner in which initiai
infections occur. It could be that the
disease is harbored and transmitted
by native grasses.
If the manner of infection can be
pinned down it may lead to more effec
tive control measures. There's a chance
that some selections or varieties of
barley carry a resistant gene. This re
quires inoculation, screening and eval
uation. All of these require time and
patience.
A real need right now is for an ac
curate but more rapid method of de
tecting the presence of the disease in
the seed. To devise such a test will
undoubtedly require a lot more ingenui
ty on the part of the scientific mind.
Many Diseases
Barley stripe is only one disease that
the plant breeders and the pathologists
have to contend with. There are many
more, and a division of time has to be
made. An all-out crash program to
whip a situation is not always possible,
nor necessarily desirable, or perhaps
practical. There are other investigators
outside of Montana concerned with this
problem, too. As time goes on we will
all be better informed.
Now you can remove the danger of
excessive yield loss by careful clean
ing. Screen out all the small kernels
—save only the plump for seed. Buy
seed stock known to be disease-free.
Renew your seed stock every three or
four years. It's good business anyway.
&
Kernels
and
Chaff
'-7
^ 'î
»
—It may be the same old story — bad
politicians are elected because "good
citizens" slay home election day.
—When you get discouraged, think
about Billy Bryan, the great orator,
who tried for the presidency of the
United States three times.
—It is well to bury some of our ugly
thoughts and sow seeds of happiness
for a bright future.
When we carefully observe those In
dian arrowheads we find, we note
those old hunters used just as precise
and accurately made hunting equip
ment as our modern hunters, although .
more simplified.
—Believe it or not—most of us have a
tender spot for some tree or group
of trees.
—Thanksgiving is the time we should
take notice of how little we have done
for others and how much others have
done for us.
—We fee! like pikers when we read of
Dr. Tom Dooley's wonderful work j
in his short life and Dr. Albert |
Schweitzer's who is still doing great j
work in his eighties.
—Man is the world's most peculiar ;
creature. One laid his silk coat on a
muddy spot for his Queen to walk on (
and others drop bombs on helpless
women and children.
—Thomas Jefferson, one of our most
brilliant presidents, said, "As we de
velop our resources and learn how
to govern ourselves we will need to
change our laws accordingly.
•Mr. Jefferson was one of the first ad
vocates ©f soil and water conserva
tion and he advised farming on the
contour wherever such practice would
prevent erosion of soil.
I
If your heating bill is around $300°°. . .
You could be wasting
*100°° in fuel every year!
Mem
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CHECK HUMIDITY—Do you feel cold at 80 degrees? Dry air speeds up evapora
tion from the body . . . has an actual cooling effect. An inexpensive humidity
gauge will tell you when the air is dry. Check the humidifier on your furnace.
Here's where to look for heat
waste and how to stop it.
The average home in the nation
wastes one-third of its home
heating fuel. To figure your own
probable loss, add up your heat
ing bills and see what one-third
amounts to. Chances are you
could save that money and be
more comfortable, too.
Here are four general areas where
you can cut fuel costs.
.
1. Save the heat you pay for
your house is poorly insulated
you can be wasting 30 % of your
heat. Check your roof a couple
days after a snowfall. If the snow
has melted everywhere but over
the eaves, you're probably losing
heat through the. roof. Weather
stripping windows and doors,
caulking cracks, and making sure
that storm windows and doors
are in good condition will save
additional dollars.
Your family can help save heat,
too. Train your children to close
doors tightly. When you bid
guests goodnight, do it inside . . .
not with the doors open.
2. Get more heat from less fuel
By maintaining proper humidity
in your home, you can lower the
FOLDER
23 WAYS TO SAVE ON HOME HEATING COSTS"
Helpful check list tells you where to look and
what to do. Ask for it at your local co-op.
FREE
U
COOP
For either "RID-TREATEO" BURNER FUEL or CO-OP LP GAS
call your local co-op affiliated with
FARMERS UNION
ST, FAUL I. MINNESOTA
CATTLE FEEDERS
See us, with no cost or obligation,
on planning your feedlot:
• Screw Conveyors
* Electric Motors
* Pillow Blocks
• V Belts & Pulleys
• Bucket Elevators
* Sprockets & Chain
* Speed Reducers
CARL WEISSMAN & SONS
INC.
Greet Falls, Mon*.
300 3rd Ave. S.
thermostat setting from 5 to 10
degrees . . . save another 10%
on fuel. If some rooms are too
hot, others too cold, check the
dampers in hot air ducts. You
can adjust them easily to balance
your system. Check furnace fil
ters every month. Clogged filters
block air flow. Keep spare filters
on hand, change often.
3. Buy high-efficiency fuels
CO-OP burner fuel, treated with
RID-172" rates at the top for
heat units per gallon. Keeps your
burner system clean, prevents
i i
rust, eliminates clogged fuel
lines, dissolves sludge. CO-OP
LP gas gives you maximum heat
per gallon. It's super-clean burn
i n g . . . gives you fast, thrifty
4. Save on the fuel you buy
heat.
Everyone can make this saving
by buying from a co-op. Savings
average 10% or $10.00 on every
$100.00 worth of fuel. You pay
the regular retail price at time
of purchase, but at the end of
the year you'll get back a good
part of what you paid,
You can use the convenient Co
op Budget Plan, too. It levels off
mid-winter fuel bills. You pay
the same amount each month.
No extra cost.
W-W PORTABLE
FARM & RANCH SCALE
WILL HANDLE UP TO 3.000 LBS.
{i $ 586.00
.1 . M ._ JL'_ (f. o. b. factory)
10-Year
I .
'
Guarantee
1
WRITE FOR
DEALER
NEAREST YOU
BOX 728 Z- DODGE CITY, KANSAS
a VfrfcW t - ,

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