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Montana farmer-stockman. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1947-1993, November 01, 1962, Image 4

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075096/1962-11-01/ed-1/seq-4/

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INTRODUCING THE BRAND NEW
PORTABLE
SPACE HEATER
LLL CHAMP
Lowest Priced
Oil Burning
Space Healer
On (he
Market
Today!
75,000
B.T.U/s
•8 gallon tank, 15 hours
burning time.
• Burns kerosene or No. 1
fuel oil.
• Operates on 110 volt AC.
1/12 h.p. motor.
• Weighs only 45 lbs. empty.
•24" high, 16" wide, 30
long.
• Optional remote thermo
stat.
• 8 inch rubber wheels.
Offers 50 % more burning time than any heater
in the 75,000 B.T.U. class, yet , . . COSTS
LESS! The Li'l Champ is shipped assembled,
ready for you to fill the tank, plug in and flip
the switch-producing safe, clean heat for
shop, garage, barn, etc.
/ /
0

»Y
#
116 Central Avenue West
Great Fails, Montana
E
Please send LI'L CHAMP literature and the name of my dealer.
NAME
ADDRESS
i J »
10
k
»
i
£'4
D
A
ADJUSTABLE
ANGLE CUTTING
UP TO 45°
Y
&
APPtOVfO
fï« e
A
TERRIFIC
VALUE
T
FEATURES
Powerful % Horsepower
Motor
Universal Type 115V—
AC-DC
3500 Strokes per Minute
Length of Stroke—11/16
Comes with. Rip Guide plus
3 Blades
R
I All Purpase Sc roll,
1 Metal Cutting
Mirror Finish
FACTORY
GUARANTEED
/
ONLY
RIPS
V
/-r
» 15 "
CIRCLES
A
'r; : >
SCROLLS
0
*
1
f
CUTS
A ✓
L
7 '
CUTS METAL
^ ' LUMBER
Send $15.88 plus $1 postage to:
B & B DISTRIBUTING CO.
Three Forks, Mont ana
Box 127
YES! i accept the 10-day free trial. If not satisfied after ten days, I will return
the Sabre Saw for prompt refund.
Nome
Town
• Route
Stote
Cheatgrass, Erosion—
Nature's Blessing?
(Continued from page 1)
h i c h empty into Montana's main
This summer the Powder,
w
99
arteries.
Tongue, Yellowstone and many other
rivers in Montana were so loaded with
silt and soil that at times they had the
viscosity of light oil.
They flowed with such speed that the
soil was held in suspension. Most of it
probably deposited on the flood
a
was pi — —
plains of the Missouri River m the
Dakotas, Nebraska and on down to the
Mississippi Delta.
The ideal situation, of course, would
be to maintain such a heavy cover of
vegetation that no erosion could take
place. This isn't always possible, par
ticularly during and following a dry
period such as we have just experi
enced. And many parts of eastern and
southeastern Montana is rough, badland
country with nude clay buttes that
won't support vegetation under any
conditions.
Erosion and silt-filled streams are a
fact of life.
But erosion to Bruce Orcutt isn't just
unavoidable evil. Like cheatgrass,
he regards it as a blessing of nature.
Erosion made this country," he ex
claims. "All of our rich farm land was
built up from soil that was
our rivers.
an
deposited by
Natural Law
Soil erosion, says Orcutt, is an ex
ample of the Natural Law. "Man,
through the use of his personal intellect,
adapt himself to nature's laws and
'use' erosion for his benefit and
can
can

well being.
How does Man adapt to the Natural
By turning on his brain. By
i i
Law?
grabbing a shovel, a hoe or a stick of
dynamite; by climbing aboard a tractor
and working to adjust nature's laws
and by putting them to work for him
according to his own individual circum
stances," he says.
"Our opportunities are limitless.
Thank Heaven there is no allotment
program on opportunity," he adds.
Bruce Orcutt adapted to the Natural
Law of Erosion by slowing down the
water and allowing the soil to settle
out on his ranch instead of flowing on
down to the Yellowstone River.
Created Meadows
Through a series of step-down dams
that spread the water out over the
creek bottom, he has literally built
hundreds of acres of fertile hay mead
on what was formerly rough range
ows
land.
Orcutt's reclamation project started
30 years age when he threw a
some
rock and log dam across a deep gully.
Silt-bearing runoff water backed up be
hind the dam and spilled over onto the
rough, eroded sagebrush land. Silt filled
in the low spots. Sagebrush, unable to
tolerate the hi eh moisture, gradually
died out. Western wheatgrass began to
grow in the newly deposited soil.
Where water flooded out over the
land, the need for another dam became
evident to further snread and slow
down the water, which led to the build
ing of another dam . . . and another
. and another, until today he has
over 25 dams on one creek that have
built up some 2,000 acres of hay mead
out of successive layers of sedi
ows
ment. The fields are as level as a table
top.
Four-Ton Yields
On most fields alfalfa was broadcast
directly in the mud with a cyclone
seeder. In years of normal runoff yields
better than four tons to the acre.
During "alfalfa seed years" the mea
are
dows produce thousands of pounds of
excellent seed.
Orcutt's land building program has
followed no set plan. It evolved. It grew
the need arose. His first dams were
built by shovel and horse-drawn fresno.
In later years more modern earth mov
ing equipment was used on some of the
larger structures.
"Anyone can do what we have done.
It's just a case of recogni
as
î )
he states,
tion of and adjustment to Natural Law.
Bruce Orcutt is always pleased to
information about his
9 9
pass on any
man-made meadows
which were
built by using "controlled'' erosion. But
he derives his greatest satisfaction
from the fact that they were built with
sweat and imagination instead of gov
ernment assistance.
Water," says Orcutt, "is our least
appreciated but most important and
irreplacable resource." Practical ranch
ers and water users, he says, should
give thoughtful consideration to the
Western intermittant stream watershed
law, as is presently interpreted, and
encourage sound, long-term, non-subsi
dized development of this great re
> i
* *
source.
Wheat Yield May
Be World Record
a WORLD RECORD winter wheat
yield on dryland may have been pro
duced in Washington State this year.
Grogan Bros., Cheney, Wash., har
vested 132.379 bushels per acre on 39.5
acres. The wheat was the new Gains
(shorty) variety.
Russia is credited with the world's
top wheat yield of 144 bushels per
acre in the proceedings of the 1961
International Soils Science Congress,
but it is not known whether it was pro
duced on dryland or under irrigation.
Regardless of the conditions under
which the Russian yield was produced,
another Washington grower, John Bain,
Quincy, probably holds the record for
irrigated wheat. This year he harvested
155.5 bushels of Gains per acre on an
11-acre field in the Columbia Basin
Irrigation Project,
The Grogan Brothers' dryland yield
was produced on a field that had been
in wheat in 1959. In 1960 it was seeded
to barley and sweet clover. Last year
the sweet clover was plowed down for
green manure.
The field was seeded Sept. 20 at a
rate of 42 pounds of seed per acre. It
was fertilized with only 32 pounds of
ammonium nitrate per acre. Because
of a wet spring, the Grogans were un
able to spray with 2,4-D. Normal pre
cipitation for that area is 16 inches a
year.
No Marketing Quotas
On 15-Acre Growers
MARKETING QUOTAS will not apply
to farmers who plant 15 acres or less of
wheat for harvest in 1963, according to
an announcement by the U.S. Depart
ment of Agriculture.
Farmers who planted no wheat in the
past may seed up to 15 acres without
marketing quota penalties, and those
with a history of less than 15 acres may
plant up to 15 acres without penalty.
This change in the provisions voted
on by growers in the August referen
dum applies only to the 1963 crop.
Details on the 1963 voluntary wheat
acreage reduction program as applied
to 15-acre producers can be obtained
from county ASCS offices.

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