OCR Interpretation


Montana farmer-stockman. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1947-1993, November 01, 1962, Image 5

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075096/1962-11-01/ed-1/seq-5/

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State Fair Arena Proposal
Goes Before Cascade Voters
By DAN THURBER, Secretary-Manager, State Fair
VOTERS OF CASCADE county will
have the opportunity Nov. 6 to vote
for or against the construction of a
new multi-purpose recreation center,
commonly referred to as a State Fair
Arena.
The building is being sponsored by
members of the Fair Board at the re
quest of the county commissioners,
business and industrial leaders, farm
ers and ranchers and interested
citizens.
It is proposed that the arena be built
on the northwest corner of the Fair
grounds, and it is pointed out that the
site is now owned by Cascade county
as a part of the fair grounds. It would
be a steel and concrete structure de
signed to seat a maximum of almost
13,000 people. It would be provided
with heating and air conditioning equip
ment which means it could be used
the year around.
The fair grounds now consists of 102
acres of land and 44 buildings. Except
for the administration building, which
houses the fair offices, none of the build
ings are provided with heating facilities.
Their use therefore is limited to sum
mertime activities when the weather is
fair and to the storage of equipment
and materials that do not require above
freezing temperatures.
Among the facts that have been pro
vided by the proponents of this build
ing project are these:
1. State Fair, as the title might sug
gest, is in no sense the Montana State
Fair. It is completely owned and op
erated by Cascade county and the title
has been adopted purely for its ad
vertising value and because there is
no state fair in Montana supported by
state appropriations.
2. The grounds and buildings, utili
ties and facilities have been built from
Fair revenue plus a small tax levy over
the period of the past 35 years. The
project was started in 1927 by a group
of progressive businessmen who be
lieved that a well managed fair would
be an asset to the people not only of
Cascade county but of this entire area.
It is all paid for and there has never
been a bond issue or debt against it.
3. Great Falls is the largest city in
the state and within 125 mile area sur
rounding the city which is considered
our prime trade area there are 225,000
people. In the city itself there is not a
building with a seating capacity of
more than 2,500 people. We are now
deprived of the cultural and entertain
ment opportunities that would be pro
vided by such attractions as symphony
orchestras, name bands, art shows and
other star attractions of this type.
With this building we could have pro
fessional basketball and hockey and
prize fight. We could have large stock
shows and sales, industrial exhibits,
conventions and church assemblies. Our
schools could hold graduation exercises
to which parents and friends could be
invited, and we could profitably enter
tain nationally known productions such
"My Fair Lady," the "Lawrence
Welk" show and many others.
4. The building would provide a
guarantee against loss during fair week
caused by bad weather. The rodeo and
the night show would be held inside
with comfortable seating and air con
ditioning. A large stock show and sales
similar to the one held in Denver each
as
year would provide an excellent op
portunity for all classes of livestock
to be exhibited and sold.
5. The arena would be financed from
money derived from the sale of general
obligation bonds issued by Cascade
county. Revenue from the use of not
only the building itself but of the en
tire Fair operation could be used to
help defray the operating cost and re
tire the obligation ii. 20 years providing
the bonds are sold at 3.5 per cent
interest.
The Fair is now receiving a tax levy
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<:
W MAKES TRACKS
i
-especially on snow-covered roads. That's how you know it's a Volkswagen. A Volks
takes to winter like a duck to water. Its engine is cooled with air, so there's no
wagen
need for anti freeze. (No flushing, no rusting, no chance of the block cracking, either!)
You can park it outside in sub-zero weather, and it's ready to roll when you turn the
key. Because the Volkswagen engine is in the rear, VW wheels get much better traction
on ice and snow, even without tire chains. If you need a transporter, station wagon
sedan that will get through (when others simply get stranded) make tracks for your
or
Volkswagen dealer's now.
m
Volkswagen Sales & Service, 3823 Montana Ave., Billings
K & L Motors, Inc., 25 So. Church St., Bozeman
Nordwall Motors, Hi-Way 2 West, Glasgow
Western Motors, 617 10th Ave. South, Great Falls
Pat Strong Motors, Inc., 533 N. Last Chance Gulch, Helena
Glacier Motors, City Route No. 7, Kalispell
Universal Motors, Inc«, 920 Kensington St,, Missoula
k
a
f
of 1.9 mills. It is estimated that an ad
ditional 1.5 mills will be required for
only a period of three years, after which
time, no additional taxes will be re
quired because revenue from the use
of the biulding and the Fair grounds
will be adequate to pay the bill.
More than 7,000 signatures have been
secured on petitions to place the issue
on the ballot in the general election
Nov. 6.
THE 4-H idea is spreading. Brazil
has 200 clubs with over 4,000 members;
Columbia has 600 clubs with 9,000 mem
bers; Ethiopia 101 clubs with 6,000
members; Iran 600 clubs and 12,000
members; Philippines 4,700 clubs with
116,000 members; Taiwan 5,300 clubs
with 65,000 members; Thailand 190
clubs with 7,000 members and Turkey
1,000 clubs with 25,000 members.
P,
2M
4PO»* a. BaHg&Cti
F4 BTCH&
A63(Cü(.Tc/RAl
BXPSRiM€NT
STATION
t
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A
~ y
"GIVE UP ON THIS ONE AND GO GET
SOME SLEEP - AFTERALL. ZIPPERS ON
SHEEP SO THEY WON'T HAVE TO BE
SHEARED,IS A TOUGH IE!"

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