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Montana oil and mining journal. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1931-1953, January 25, 1936, Image 4

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075103/1936-01-25/ed-1/seq-4/

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Ooumal
Hvonta
TO
rß*r
PUBLISHED WEEKLY
ESTABLISHED 1921
Owned and published by the Montana Oil Journal, a Montana
corporation. Address all communications to 818 First
National Bank Building, Great Falte, Montana.
O. I. DeSCHON, Publisher.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES;
$2.00 Per Year in Advance. Canada and Foreign Subscriptions $2.60
Per Year. $1.25—6 Months. Foreign, $1:76—6 Months.
Published Every Saturday.
Entered as Second-Class Matter April 23, 1921, at the Post Office
at Great Falls. Mont ana, Under Act of March 3. 1879. _
The Montana OH and Mining Journal endeavors to insure the
honesty nd trustworthiness of every advertisement it prints and
tc avoid the publication of all advetlsements containing misleading
statements or claims
ADVERTISING RATES ON APPLICATION
LAUGHING AWAY AN OPPORTUNITY
Darius Green and his Flying Machine" did more to delay
the development of aviation than any other factor, for the reason
that it is easier ho laugh away a new enterprise or idea than to
prove its value. It required a Lindberg, spanning the ocean in a, 1
non-stop flight, to wipe derisive grins off the faces of disbelievers.
In like manner, the greatest enenfy of mine financing today is
Mark Twain's definition; that a mine is a hole in the ground owned
by a liar. Any who has read Twaiin's experiences in a mining
ture is ready with a grin when approached on the subject of mine
financing.
That the fafmous Mr. Clemmins should be highly successful as
an author and a failure as a miner is not surprising, Harry Sinclair
was a failure as a merchant and a druggist. He "went broke" in
practically everything he tried, until he went into the oil business,
in which he aanjassed millions. That is true of men in every line of
business. Few ribbon clerks can become successful mine operators
and by the same token, few gold miners could hold a job as a rib
bon clerk. Yet there is a prevelant idea that anyone should be able
to succeed in induing.
The human element will always be a deciding factor in the suc
cess of a mining project. The great Homestake mine is paying mil
lions of dollars in dividends from the mining and milling of low
grade ores—ores so 'lean" that the average miner could not af
ford to handle them. The success of the Homestake in the hands
of a Mark Twain would be highly improbable. Yet oddly enough,
Twain 's failure laughed a,way many an opportunity for profitable
investment.
<<
ven
Oil Trade Notes
Of Interest to Refiners and Marketers
TAXES GIVE GOVERNMENT 57% PROFIT
The Alabama gasoline dealer who posted a sign at his
tkm explaining that while motor fuel costs 10c a gallon retail, he has to
charge 22c because of taxes, has started oil men of Oklahoma, where
mudh of the gasoline comes from, wondering Just who really makes
money from gasoline— dealet or government.
Oklahoma oil men sell gasoline wholesale, In carioad lots. Taey say
an ordinary carload of common white gasoline sells at the refinery iw
$376. Costs of wholesale and retail distribution, which Include the wages
of the filling station attendant, transportation, equipment, waste, loss
and profite, if any—are estimated at $400 per carload.
Federal and state governments then add taxes amounting to $440 ,i
which represents a net profit of about 57 per cent for government, s '"çe
the oil men have to collect the tax themselves. Motorists eventuaUy buy
at a cost to them of $1.125, this carload of gasoline worth $375 F. O. U.
refinery and $775 put-ln-tank, roadside.
Sixty Continental station operators met in Great Falls this week
hear Frank Moore, sales promotion manager, of ™*' B8 ™nt
to
who gave the sales promotion program
division manager of Butte presided.^ ^ ^
John L. "Chick" Sulgrove has changed the name of his service sta
tion in choteau from "Tom's Service Station" to Chick s Shell Stat on.
Brlthh-Amorican OU Co., owning the Coutte refinery has Phased
the distributing system of the Okanagan-Kootenay Oil Co., in interior
British Columbia, including the holdings of R. J. Christian, manager of
the comipany, at Penticton.
i>
I For Complete Satisfaction
Two Grades Of Our Gasoline:
SILVER GAS the crystal-clear, high-octane white
sensation In the motoring
gas that is creating a
world. CHIEF' MONTO GASOLINE that Is a de
pendable and popular gasoline for all gpnorkJ
motoring.
Various Types Of Greases and
Lubricating Oils: =
RING-FREE MOTOR OIL and ROYAL
SOOT MOTOR OIL sold In all weights
for all type« of lubrication.
Dependable Distillate =
And Good Deisel Fuel
i;
Two motor fuels that meet spec- |5|
ial needs in a highly satisfac- jjjjS
tory and economical manner.
is
'A
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s
\
An aü-Montana Institution"—Great Falls
*<
(
Son Wit
SbsfS
, v
A customer stepped Into a gun
store, apparently Intent on making
purchase. The salesman set about
showing him what was in stock.
The first weapon brought out was
a handsome, elngle trigger, over
and-under FVancot, and just about
the last word in a very swell shot
gun. The customer was very much
interested, but Che price, $60i0 was
far beyond bis means. The next
assortment shown was a group of
a
7T
John Smith Finds A Homestead
Into 640 acres. So when John
Smith took up 320 acres, he
had a "half section."
His half section might be
described as the Elast Half
of Section 1, It might be
the North Half of Section 1.
It is easy to recognize any
given half of a section.
However, ' all nomesteads
were not confined to a sim
ple description. Sometimes
the homesteader had 160 acres
in one section and 100 acres
in the adjoining section. So
it was that he described his
half section as the Northwest
Quarter of Section 1 and the
Northeast Quarter of Section
2. A quarter of a section is
a fourth of 640 acres, of 160
acres. A quarter of each of
two sections gives him 320
acres.
Perhaps he had only 80
acres In section 1 and 240
acres in section 2. That call
ed for this description: the
West Hhlf of the Northwest
quartet of section 1: the
Northeast quarter of Section
two and the East Half of
the Northwest Quarter of
Section Two.
It is apparent that a half
of a quarter (160 acres) i g
80 acreg. Likewise a quarter
of a quarter (160 acres) is
40 acres. That is the lowest
common unit In land des
cription: 40 acres. Thus the
northeast quarter of the north
east quarter is easily loca
ted and instantly recognized
as 40 acres.
In the Blackfeet Indian
Reservation the Indians filed
on all sorts of tracts which
the white man has difficulty
in describing and which gives
headaches to abstractors :
Thus we may have such a
description as this: N% E%
SE% SW14 Section 1.
To locate this we first find
the SW V *, then we take a
quarter- of that and get 40
the west half of that
is 20 acres, the east half of
that ig 10 acres and the north
half of that is five acres.
Armed with these fficts,
John Smith could easily spot
his farm buildings on a plat
of his land. He could drive
a stake somewhere
half section and give a des
cription of the location so
that a surveyor could walk
directly to the stake, or con
versely mark It on a map.
Thus If a stake were 220
feet north of the south line
and 220 feet east of the west
line of Section 1, the sur
veyor or anyone else could
quickly locate tihe söuthwest
of the section, walk
due east 220 feet, thence due
north 220 feet and find the
stake.
Each township Is numbered
to show itg position with re
gard to meridian Hnes. The
Montana principal meridian
runs through Kevln-Sunbur g t
field. The townships WEST
of this meridian are number
ed from that line westward
startling with 1, then 2» 3
During the past three weeks
we have reviewed the A. B.
C's of geology, giving the lay.
man a general idea of the
source of oil and how it ac
cumulates and the conditions
commercial
m
NU Nil
WEST HAXf
OF
NORTHWEST
QUARTER
which
under
amounts of oil may be found.
NORTHEAST
QUARTER
We saw that oil is gene
rated by heat and pressure
exerted on certain shales In
the process of mountain build
ing. Waters of present and
past ages traveling by gra
vity from high to low points
carries any oil that may seep
into porous i'ocks, suclh os
sandstones back away from the
mountains. This oil. in drops
particles of microscopic
size gathers over countless
ages, floating on top of wa
ter. It comes to rest at a
point where the water ceases
to circulate. The places where
underground circulation of wa
ter Is most frequently halted
are called "faults" and "anti
clines."
Then comes the birth of
mankind and eventually the
establishment of government
and an American we call John
Smith goes west to get him
self a piece of land where he
can find the Independence so
alluringly described by Hor
ace Greely. He picks as good
a piece of ground as he can
find and files a homestead.
To "prove up" Smith is re
quired to live on the land for
three years, to plow up 40
acres, build a home and out
buildings and bnild a fence.
He is allowed a total of 320
acres of farm land or 640
acres of grazing land. This
completed, he gets witnesses
to prove his assertion that he
hag so "proved up" and a
benevolent Uncle Sam gives
him a "patent" to his land,
bearing tihe autograph of the
president.
Thus are base titles es
tablished. Before 1919 the
man who so proved up on
hlg homestead owned that 320
acres from the gky to the
center of the earth, includ
ing all the mineral rights of
every kind.
But few homesteaders filed
on land in the belief that it
was oil land, although if peo
ple had known as much about
geology before 1919 as they
do now, everyone would be
looking for a chance to file
a homestead on an <511 struc
ture. That is no longer pos
sible because the government
now reserves all minerals in
the public domain.
The first thing John,. Smith
had to learn was how to lo
cate hlmeelf on the homestead.
He had to know the meaning
of such terms as "township,"
"range" and "section."
Briefly, here te his lesson:
A township
square miles; six miles long
by six miles wide. Each square
mile is called a "section". So
& section is a mile long and
a mile wide (5,280x 5,280
feet). Each section is divided
SEJ NEl
1
or
SOUTH
BAUE
i
and so on up to 34, the west
border of the state. The town
ships BAST of this meridian
are numbered from that line
eastward in a like manner.
1, then 2, 3, 4 and so on up
to 68E.
These are called RANGE
LINEÎS. We must not say
"range four hut must say
range four WEST or range
four BAST. Knowing the lo
cation of the Montana Mer
dian, we can easilly locate
range 2 east by traveling due
eastward from the meridian
for a distance of six mlle g .
The townships are number
ed north and south of a line
which passes through south
central Montana, crossing the
Montana meridian near Three
Porks, Gallatin County. So a
townships is described by a
second dimension; either north
or south of this line. Town
ship 37 Is 37 times 6 miles
or 242 miles south of this
line. That Is the northern
most township In Montana.
The southernmost township
is 15 south.
So we locate a tract in
Kevin^Sunburst field by lo
cating the range, then the
township, then the section and
finally the division of the
section. Thus we describe the
Barr farm in Kevln-Snnburst
as the North Half of Section
Two, Township Thirty-five N,
Range Two West of the Mon
tana Principal Meridian. We
can instantly locate the tract
on the map. If a well is jot
ted in the center of the SB%
NW!4 we (find the northwest
quarter, then the southeast
quarter of that and mark the
center of the 40 acre g so es
tablished.
However, we have gotten
far ahead of the narrative
of John Smith, whose land
may or may not be oil land,
in this story,
dure of the leasing of his
land la the next step in our
narrative.
i
i
1
1
S:
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g
§
1
h-:
Ig
g
^=5
acres:
*
=5
i
in hla
S

corner
i
constitutes 36
1
Th© proce
I
NOTICE TO MEMBERS: Some time ago we sent out a bulletin stating that an IM
PORTANT EVENT—the most important in the history of this orgamzaion—^was pend
ing. It has been CONSUMMATED: thé greatest stroke of good business m our history.
It pertains to Kevin-Sunburst Those interested in this field can receive the full news by
asking for the forthcoming confidential bulleton.
m
1
1
v
Landowners
Royalties Co,
Box 1225
LANDOWNERS ROYALTIES COMPANY
GREAT FALLS. MONTANA.

Without obligation pleas« send me yjnr publications
Kevin-S unburst. . 1 .
on
i,
f .
(-our Name in Fail)
:
i
xt
:
I'r*
►A
HEAD OFFICE:
GREAT FALLE, MORAVA
:
-
-
• a
3 f
English doubles brought out by
gunsmiths known all or er the
world for their expert craftsman
ship. Still too high, thought the
customer, and then asked If they
had something cheaper.
Yes. the salesman said, there
were some inexpensive models that
were made In this country and he
could let him have one in the
neighborhood of $40.
"I'M* take ene of these,'' the
customer told the salesman with
considerable enthusiasm. "It's really
going to be a very simple wed
ding.'*
• •
»
CLEVER THESE CHINESE
A new Chinese cook employed
on a ranch in the Far West, was
the buM of a good many practical
Joke . On the first night, the hands
nailed his shoes on the floor. On
the second night, they poured cold
water on him as he lay sleeping.
This went on for about ten days
without a single protest from the
cock. The hands decided he was
a good sport.
''Ling," one of them said flnal
ly. "you're all right. Wei! call off
the practical Jokes.
"No more plaotical Jokes?" Ling
asked, " All light, no more kel
osene in coffee.
ft
' •
The bearded lady in the circus
died today, leaving a wife and four
children.
• ••••••
Visitor (to little girl) "Was your
grandpa covered by insurance when
his home burned?"
Little Girl: "No'm; just a night
shirt.'*
After the golf game, having Just
refused a drink and a smoke, the
new member explained as follows:
"Gentlemen, it may surprise
you, but I do not drink, or smoke,
or swear, or run around with wo
men. In fact. I have but one vice."
"What's that," someone asked,
and the new member replied, "Well,
I He just a little."
Drill Contractor (to applicant);
I am inclined to grive you the po
sition If you understand the dou
I
bie-entry System of bookkeeping '
Applicant: "I do, Indeed! At
my last place I had to do a triple
entry—a set tor the active part
ner, showing the real profits, a
set for the sleeping partner, show
ing profits, and a set for the In
come tax officiate, showing no pro
tits.
• ••••••
"I am sending a little more ma
terial for the Badger just in case
he might run short some time in
the future," writes W. E. Jones
of Joplin, Mo., a steady contribu
tor. "Of course, I am not expect
ing this to put me in anywhere near
in line for the grand prize which
1 understand is to be a fnr lined
bathtub. Nevertheless it would be
appeciated just now as we are
having quite a spell of winter for
this part of the country."
No Mr. Jones, The prize this
year is a demountable cuckoo clock.
You know how much trouble it is
to take the old fashioned kind out
for excercise. Well, that's the 1936
prize.

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