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Montana oil and mining journal. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1931-1953, August 08, 1936, Image 6

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075103/1936-08-08/ed-1/seq-6/

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Breastworks Sind Grave
attle Site, Trails
on
Now Highways, Tell of Gen. Custer at Glendive
By WILLIAM WEST
The ill-starred General George A.
Custer blazed one of the earliest
trails across Dawson county In
eastern Montana, and around Glen
dlve, the county seat, there are
many reminders of the early ac
tivity of "The Glory Hunter." In
1876, General Custer, in command
of the Seventh U. 8. cavalry, was
ordered by the war department to
lead his troop to the mouth of the
Tongue river, join forces with Gen
erals Terry and Crook, and Major
Reno, and subdue the Sioux In
dians, who were making life mis
erable for white settlers. The trail
blazed by Custer on that fateful
journey was, for many years there
after, used as a mail route between
Bismarck and Fort Keogh, near the
present site of Miles City. A portion
of the modem highway, U. S. 10,
follows the route taken by Custer
on that last campaign.
Custer had been In this region ,as|
early as 1873 and near Glendive there'
is a spot of tremendous historic Inter-1
est where a part of his Seventh cavalry
battled Indians In the winter of that
year. The old battleground is
knoll in the pasture of a farm now
owned by Dr. R. H. Good. Here are
seen the well-defined remains of
breastworks and graves. Here the army'
escort to the preliminary surveying I
party of the Northern Pacific railroad
fought a band of Sioux and Cheyenne
warriors. The surveying party was a
large one, with many wagons and a
large supply of foodstuffs. It was pro
tected by the 13th and 17th infantry,!
a part of the Fifth cavalry and the!
Seventh cavalry under the command of |
General Custer. The soldiers and the !
survey
camp
In the fall of 1873. A battalion of sol
diers and the supply wagons they had
been detailed to guard crossed the Yel
lowstone and made camp on the knoll
which Is now a part of Dr. Good's farm.
One morning at daybreak both this
camp and the (rider, larger camp on the
east side of the river were attacked by
Indians After a short but fierce en
counter the tribesmen were repulsed
and the two camps united. A number of
soldiers had been killed in the smaller
camp and they were buried within the
earthworks which had been hastily
thrown up for protection. Today the old,
sunken graves and the earthworks are
still plainly seen and the deeply rutted 1
wagon trail leading up to them Is also
on a little
my had m,ade their winter
the mouth of Glendlve creek
plainly discernible. Some of the men
who took part in this early skirmish
were killed three years later in the
famous Custer massacre.
"Coster Lookout" a Misnomer
There is another landmark in ih#>
Glendlve area which is connected at
least bv Wend with CiSlt l, «
bold, squared toppecT butte which to Ln
west of highway 14, five miles south•
of Glendlve. The butte has long been
known as Custer's lookout. However,
Charles Guiles, pioneer and veteran
army teamster of Glendlve, declares
that Custer would never have been so
thoughtless as to climb this prominent
point to look for Indians. Such an act
would have made him a target for any
énemy Redman within miles. Accord
ing to the story told by Mr. Guiles,
some "fool subordinate officer," who
had never fought Indians, sent a body
of soldiers to the summit of the butte
to act as sentinels and watch for the
approach of hostile Indians, The sol
diers. victims of ignorance on the part
of their superior, were picked off by
sharpshooters among the Indians. The
wlse officers directed their men to
hunt the Indians as the Indians hunted
them, by crawling through the grass.
It Is also said that Custer's lookout
was used by the Indians as a signaling
point. According to legend, early white
settlers often saw smoke signals rising
from the summit of the butte.
McCone Also Knew Indians
A little booklet published by the late !
inator George McCone, shows that
he was closely connected with the early :
history of Dawson county as well as
with that of all eastern Montana and
Dakota. In 1879 McCone carried mail
over the route between Bismarck and
Fort Keogh, which had originally been
blazed by General Custer. He was then
to the employ of Valle. Miner, Peck
and Co., who were holders of the con
tract to carry the mall over this 320
mile stretch of dangerous Indian coun-1
try. Life on this mail route was one of j
continual excitement and hazard. One
day in late July, 1879, McCone was !
waiting for his relief carrier at Little
Beaver mall station. The relief carrier
was a man named Green who, oddly!
enough, came from Green river. Green
was late and McCone, becoming anx
lous, drove ahead to investigate. Near
ing the stAtion which was known as
I Màjioniki PtSTIUtKS
A consistent leader in the
field of low-priced bourbons,
Windsor is an odds-on favor
ite with men who really know
whiskey value!
■[ ■'
x.
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.
UHnils
\
[ eg g et» ..;
9) PROOF — STRAIGHT BOURBON WHISKEY
NATIONAL OUTILLE RS PXODUCTS CORPORATION. Exeemtier Often N. Y. C
j
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|
___—-
Early-Day Trail Blazer in Dawson County
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GENERAL GEORGE A. CUSTER
Antelope, he came upon his relief car
rier and a man named Donovan. Both
had been shot by Indians. The men had
been riding in a buckboard when the
savages approached. The horses be
ca^e excited and ran aw,ay at the sound
of the war whoops of the Indians and
the two white ^n^mowing thatlt was
the Intention of.the.todtasi teJake
the wagon and horses, abandoned It.
Wounded, they crawled into the sage
had been therefor 24hours when Me
Cone d r^n
in
had been «ho* ^ the side and was in
terrible agony. .McCone put toe two
men h* his bucklward and droyc to a
surveying camp, 35 miles away. Upon
h , ls fc Fï val S* .ff 6 ,
, î£5nn W rtiSfn
the ?!,« „am»
P°*t *«
ouch was the hardiness of the men
^Jio first carried mall to the outposts
the Montana frontier.
Chief Errs, Makes Amends
B ut there was comedv as well as
traeedv on the frontier and in his
poojupt McCone related the story of his
adventures as a fur-trader He was lo
catedata hunttag campofthe Gros
Ventre Indiansat ithe mouth of Ä
teen-Mlle creek, in 1881. There were 40
lodges in the camp and the chief was
a handsome brave named Hard Horn.
Hard Horn's son h,ad been selected by
government authorities tor education
in a military school at Hampton, Va.
The boy had been gone for a long
time and Hard Horn was very anxious,
for he had not heard from him. He
appealed to McCone to do something
for him so that he might know li his
boy was s<ife in the white man's "place
to learn fighting." McCone wrote a
letter to the president of the college,
requesting that he send word to Hard
Horn concerning his son. Hard Horn
could not understand why he did not
receive an answer to the letter at once.
He set a deadline and when the letter
was not forthcoming he was so en
raged that the entire Gros Ventre camp
withdrew from McCone's vicinity and
refused to trade At his store. Finally,
after several weeks, an answer to the
. . ... .. ._.
letter arrived, and withlt was a photo
of Hard Horn's son. The old Indian
chief was so gratified that he made
profuse apology and presented a buck
skin suit, beaded leggings, gun sheath
and other accoutrements to McCone,
These gifts are preserved and are on
display in the Glendlve public library
Dawson county was among the first
of Montana's counties. It was created
five years after the new Montana ter
rltory was created. There were few
whlte people In the country at the
tlme ' 1116 on 'y whl £es being a few sol
dlers ,and trappers. The first large num
of w hite men came in for the buf
faJo hunts and for several yearn each
„inter saw large crews of robe hunters
kl ni ng buffalo and preparing hides for
shipment down the Yellowstone
river steamers. In summer these hunt
erB *P entl their time chopping wood
for sale to the river steamers. Among
the early robe hunters and wood chop
pers were Edward Marron and James
g^jg W h 0 c.ame to the area in 1876
^ W hose names are closely identi
fied with early Dawson county history,
Other early comers were J. L. Burns
and George Harpster, who brought
their families. Their descendants are
residents of the county today. These
men helped erect the Dawson county
courthouse, which was built In 1883.
? is one of Montana's oldest court
house buildings and is still in use.
Town Moves to Railroad
The route of the Northern Pacific had
much to do with the location of Glen
dive. The railroad arrived at the site
of Glendlve in 1881. A little town had
been started on a high flat above the
army supply station on Glendlve creek.
but when It became evident that the
railroad would not touch the site of
the village, the settlers moved their
town bodily down to the railroad,
One of Glendlve's earliest merchants
was H. F. Douglas, who built a great
on
POWDER RIVER
LAST OF GREAT
CATTLE LANDS
By WALTER ED TAYLOR
Many have heard of Powder
river; not so many have beard of
Powder River county.
Powder river gained its fame from
the famous cry, "Powder river, let
'er buck!" It is known as a river
"400 miles long, a mile wide, and an
Inch deep." "Powder river, let 'er
buck!" was the battle cry of the
hard-boiled 91st division of the
A. E. F. Many members of the 91st
were from Montana. The saying
originated in the early days when
a strange cowpnncher. upon being
asked if he could ride a certain
horse, said, "Pm from Powder river,
let' er buck." The phrase became
popular as a cry of derision
cowboys undertaking
task.
Fewer have heard of Powder
River county because there are not
many people in the county to make
a ballyhoo. Broad ns, the county
seat, has only 300 souls. Past its
Powder river, which
originates as a mere trickle of
water In the Big Horn mountains
of Wyoming. It is the center of one
of the last great cattle countries
of the west. Many of the old-time
outfits which came in in the early
1880's still operate. Some of the
pioneer ranchers still actively en
gaged in that country are Charles
Scofield of Cross ranch; George
Pemberton of the TA ranch, who
Used to run as
Lee Wilson of
Cattle Co. Wilson was the first
white child born in the county.
among
a dangerous
doors runs
many aa 30.000 head;
the N-Bar Sheep
I nd
4
FAIR EXHIBITS EXPENSE
County comnilaatnam are not authoriied
law to egpend more than $300 In the col
lection, tranarorttnc and taking care of ea
hibtta for fairs, seed «hows or other agricul
tural exhlbltiona. according to an opinion de
livered by the attorney general at the re
quest of Cugcne L. Morphy. Teton county
attorney The county attorney had asked
whether the commtMdeoers were limited to
two for all purpoaes or whether they
could appropriate «9» ter each fair.
log building to bouse bis general store.
The first drug store was housed in a
tent and was run by Hope Davis. The
first schoolhouse in the town was a
one-room, frame building, completed
in 1881. Miss Hetty Harpster was the
first teacher. This pioneer woman came
to Montana in 1878 and still resides
at Glendive, a charming old lady with
many stories of pioneer days to tell.:
She recalls that her salary as first
teacher was very small and that a part
of it was raised by giving a box supper.
The first installment of her first year's I
salary was paid early In the year but
it was not until the following June that
she received the remainder of her
money.
With the excitement of the coming 1
of the railroad over, in 1881, Glendive
got ready to go. John Trtiscott, who;
lives in Miles City now, surveyed the 1
townslte, settlers came in, and by 1886
Glendlve had a population of 1,200.
Those days, the days of the great cattle
ranches, were the great days, say the'
oid-tlmers. Those were the days when!
hospitality and generosity reigned. The
latch on every ranchhouse door was
out and the children of ranch families
always went out to the bunkhouse in
the morning to count the punchers, so
that breakfast could be fixed for any
strangers who had drifted in during
the night.
Real West Was Here
The larger rAnches gave annual
dances, to which residents and any
travelers in the country were invited.
The guests came from as far as 30 miles
in wagons and on horseback. The dance
continued from nightfall to dawn.
Supper was served at midnight and
the guests danced until breakfast time,
when they had a big meal and de
P One of the big social events of Glen
ofimn£ ay ni to . Mrs
Grace Giimm-e pioneer resident, was
the Pioneers ball, which was given
N ™f£ ear ? 1 VC ' 1883 ' to " lebn L te
the erection of the new county court
house. This was a big affair, done up
in city style. Flowers and programs
were ordered from St. Paul. The hall
was decorated; everything went off per
fectly, as scheduled; "Pop Goes The
Weasel" and the "Virginia Reel" were
the most popular tunes played by the
orchestra: and, because there were 20
men to every woman in the dance hall, ;
there were no "wallflowers." It was a
memorable party and at midnight the !
guests went to Harry Helm's Bon Ton
restaurant for a banquet 1
There are few reminders of the early>
Glendlve to be seen today, but the ortg- 1
Inal log building, built by H. F. Douglas
to house his store in the early '0O's. !
tends. The old logs have been I
d with siding and the building
now used as a rpsidepce.
still s
covere
is
!
^ Q ED v
iir
TH*
m
GOLD«
goddess
m
01
ZHOURS LATER
(GREAT SCOTT?
) GET THE WEN
f WBONGO—
WE U GO AFTER
V THEM I/«S
mmmMA!
SO YOU'D UKE TO \
GO ON A LION HUNT,, , „ ,
EH. JERRY? WEU,?* ir ROBERT,
lU BE READY
BAD NATIVES TAKE
YOUNG WHITE BOV
AND BWANA STERN
OH, SWELL,
WEU. START IN
AN HOUR f _
OF
ny ms fU 08 T CHWl®
SSsattSft-—
:
m
<
1
GOOD LUCKfjj
I'M GOING TO '
y GIVE THE SHIP
R A GOING OVER
e,
m
aaaM Hi
- _
^2
BAD
N
MEN SAY THEY NO GO
SAY THIS IS COUNTRY
j Of GOLDEN GODDESS^,
l MEN AFRAID!
TH£ DEVUS!
WEU DIVE
ON THEM
ITS OUR
ONLY
CHANCE \)
NATIVES [m
RUN THI S I:!.!
WAV - /OH. CAPTAI N^
1 FRANK
wo/room*
c THene* J
u
m
>;
m
WHJ AUR/CHrr
WH.! WE GO ALONE
■l IN MV PLANE.
JBy-vou come,
HfM'BON GO-SHOW
US THE WAV!
j.
L*
M-BEFORE THEY à
îM COME BACK ! 1
GREAT SCOTT !l
SHE'S WHITE f M
HOW IN THE t ,
Inaaaeof..J
mij/, -
WHEN THEY KILLED M- pj
MOTHER AND FATHER. | THAT'S AWFUL ! I
THE MEDICINE MEN VBUT YOU'RE
MADE ME A GODDESS TO) SA FE NOW ! J
FRIGHTEN THE SAVAGES. W . a, pJSM n^
- - m&ÆÊÊW&mmt
mW
m
7 LOOK AT THE DEVILS
RUN? GUESS THEYVE NEVER]
SEENA PLANE BEFORE ! W
U;
%/s
(sAOtMÇ Wl
BY JOVE. YtHATS ALL A MATTER OF KEEPING
HAWKS ? FIT, OLD MAN. THATS WHY I URGE
YOU R ALL MV AIR HAWKS TO EAT LOTS
NERVES OF POSTS BRAN FLAKES.THEYRE
MUST BE 1 MIGHTY GOQ&JOR YOU !/H EVE R. ATE,
k STEEL! « -irM-_ ^ TOO!
AND ITS THE
SWELLEST
TASTING
CEREAL YOU
BOYS AND GIRLS! . . . JOIN
CAPT. FRANK'S AIR HAWKS!
FREE BIKES! «"d hanv other fkeepmzesi
J j;
NLY Capt. Frank's Air Hawks can get
one of these FREE Bikes .. . and the
many other wonderful free prizes! Just N
send coupon with one Post's 40% Bran
Flakes box-top to Capt. Frank Hawks. He ^
will then enroll you in his Air Hawks ... '**'
send you your official
Wing-Badge. He'll tell
you how to enter the m j/j
FREE Bike contest. . .MljfiL
and send you a catalog B
of all the other valu- 1 i
able Free Prizes. V J/
\ J't /'S
o

nM
i
AVMterS KNIFE STRATOSPHERE
AND COMPASS. HELMET WITH
FREE FOR 12 COOOLES. FREE
FOR 13 BOX-TOPS.
BOX-TOPS.
i
SO DELICIOUSLY DIFFERENT
How you'll love these crunchy, golden
flakes . . . with the deliciously different
nut-like flavor! But that is not all! Eaten
daily, they help keep you fit! For they help
supply the bulk food many diets lack. And
sdeqmate hulk is nsctssmrj
fur keeping fit. So start eat
ing Post's 40% Bran Flakes
—the original bran flakes—
right away. A Post Cereal
—made by General Foods.
Equal chance
for boy. and
SirU to win.
-,
r
) CAPT. FRANK HAWKS
*/• Fast's 40% Bran FMtnt, BaM* Crank. Mkk. J
Bran Flakes package- |
1 tops. Please send me the items checked below. I
2 ( ) Official Wins-Badae (send I package-top) J
C ) Cape Hawks' Photo (send t package-top) J
( PmI csrrtct pmsuge mu letter)
1C. H. A I- 10-34
OFFICIAL WING
BADGE. Two-tone
silver finish. Capt.
Frank's head in cen
ter. 1 bog-top.
CAPT. FRANK'S
SIGNED PHOTO,
suitable
for fram
I
• i
»
SVV;
Name.
-Age,
for t boa-.
I City
j iOger pur!mmhmVS.A.mudemeeniO* H.I9Î6) I
f
Trim U/innîiwr Cccatrioé
1110 WlflOlBg tSSaVISl
nr*n t i , V\
W| I Pâf h äf i 111 ff Oil
TT ,U ICÄUI l/UUUU
I
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;
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i
Mi» Erma Young, 21-year-old
"Why I Should Uketo See y New
York," entitling her to a week's
tour of New York city as a guest of
the Pan-Hellenic association, will
teach English in the Dutton high
school this winter. Mi» Young is
a choteau rirl
*
wis-va napiniv nrminn«
HELENA RAPIDLY REBUILDS
The terrorizing din of earthquakes;
that battered Helena for a $4,000,000
or more loss last fall is forgotten today
In the continual day-long symphony of I
snorting power shovels, singing saws
and tapping hammers. Helena has
spent two And a half million dollars in ;
new construction and reconstruction of !
homes and business buildings since
major earth shocks dealt the Montana I
capital a one-two punch last October.
-♦
w '
ERMA YOUNG
Hie difference between stumbling
blocks and stepping stones is the way
you use them.
After the Manner of
Books and UmhreUas,
This Cane Came Back
Given up for lost for 25 years, » val
uable gold-headed cane is again in the
firm grip of Tom Pollard, Red Lodge
hotel owner.
Back ln 1911 Pollard lent the cane
to an avlAtor named St. John, who had
hurt his leg In an accident. The aviator
promised to send It back, but after a
few months, Pollard abandoned hope
of ever seeing it again.
On a recent Sunday morning Joe
Meehan, operator at the Northern Pa
clfic stAtion at Red Lodge, was cleaning
out a closet at the depot. He found
what looked to be an old black wooden
cane, and noticed the handle was heavy
and embellished with some sort of en
graving. Cleaning treatment brought
mit the shiny gold handle bearing an
inscription which showed that in 1903
the Elks club of Virginia City had given
the qane to T. F. Pollard in honor at
his service as grand exalted ruler. Pol
lard once lived in Virginia City.
The stick, apparently, bad been ex
pressed back to Red Lodge by St. John,
had been lost unnoticed at the depot
it
S
I
I
i>*
L>
r' s *.
I
I
for a quarter of a century.
>
J
g)
Ql
*9#
*
*
c*')
iC. and
[( KEEP 1
THE ,1
GtENMORC DISTILLERIES CO., Ine. j
Loul««IIIa • Owansboro
Largest Distillery In Kentucky

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