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Montana oil and mining journal. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1931-1953, August 08, 1936, Image 7

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075103/1936-08-08/ed-1/seq-7/

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— ADVERTISEMENTS —
BUCKS FOE SALE
BUCKS—2M MEAD of yearlings. 100
*»•«* O* J y***.
■ be ** K g 0 ™ "" iî*?. V®* °* " ood *° ■***•
B 0. WEHTE, Buffalo. Montan»,_
RUBBER STAMPS AND SEALS
RUBBER AND METAL STAMPS,
Stencils, check Hens. PACIFIC STAMP
WORKS. W 516 Sprague Ave.. Spokane. Wash,
jssmst
tt» opportunities in the executi*e branche*
<tf this fast rrowins industry, to prepare dur
Sa tt—
—ÆJSBS&jaœssïKSHfâ™
A GIFT SHOP FREE! Pilled with
Oçcjtoi roars without tavest^nt H you «re
boBMt. Ho curiosityseekerx. Sendis .to
cover mailing and information. phyllms nkl
boh, 8908 Beiiefonuine. K«n »«» cur. Mo.
Rwrw parlor AND NIGHT CLUB
"Suf tecteas for »«le Popularly
located at Port Peck project. Must be »een
to be appreciated. Box mi. Port Peck. Mont,
fltM , R A t s T o R E mode nTmeat
Q «£uL^eft A doinf g°d tosiSlSTri ^SSs
aa*eat«te wnte toomäs w. Lows, admin
tstrator Moore, Montane.
inoiTinw rn» nnrrflx
Clyde Part
information '
Montana, for information. -
_TEACHERS' AGENCX;_
M S n pf a A icaify aii *oarTmenu,
spiendid*opport uni ties in Aueuitt. Enroll im
AVIATION
mediately.
Hu« Teachers' Agency. Mlsaoula Montana,
(Member N. a. T. a.) -1
EDUCATIONAL _
rrôuiEGÉ roTOÎTîsnrptt
— «" OOODINO coin».,,
CAREER MINDED—Young women
With some knowledge of shorthand and
typewriting with an eye to the future, who
observed the changes in business struc
ture, to prepare In spare time for executive
wcretariai position, write Box 1435 , Butte,
Montana.
Ooodlnx. Idaho.
SECRETARIAL TKA1XINO.
_h ousekeeper wanted_
MRS PECTABLE. PROTESTANT house
keeper wanted on farm at once. 0. B. Chrl*
topherson, Edinburg, N. D. _
^ AS^AYERSt^pHOi^STS^ _ ^^ ^
LEWIS & WALKER, assayers, chem
laU. 108 N. Wyoming, BOTTE. MONT.
MOTORCYCLES
HARLEY-DAVIDSON8, bicycles, parts,
repair». BLASIUS. INC., Idaho Falls. Idaho.
DIESEL
WE WANT TO INTERVIEW reliable
men. mechanically inclined to start Im
mediate training In this vicinity to Install,
service, operate DIESEL ENGINES. Tool» fur
nished. Write today. Sehoeck Diesel Training
Division. Box 1435, Sutie. Montan».
USED AUTO PARTS
Used parts for ail
car. Great Falls.
Auto Parts Co.
MISCELLANEOUS FOB. SALE
OUR USED SACKS (RECLEANED) for
wbsat. oats—any other purpose—are abso
lutely guaranteed and prices are low. ALASKA
JUNK OQ„ Inc.. Spokana. Waal».
FILM FINISHING
ROLLS DEVELOPED—«
prints, two double weight pro
fessional enlargements, or —
enlargement framed, 38c coin.
Sc each. NORTHWEST
_PHOTO SERVICE. Fargo, N. D.
KODAK ROLLS, SIX AND EIGHT
exposures, developed and printed, also one
Ktl enlargement, 25 cents. Guaranteed "sup
•rgloss' prints ot fine quality. Firm eatab
Babed 28 years. Northwestern Foto Service,
Mandan, N. D. ____
TWO BEAUTIFUL DOUBLE WEIGHT
Professional Enlargements. 8 gua rantee d
Never-Pade prints, 2S cents coin. CENTURY
PHOTO SERVICE, LaOrosae. Wig._
TRACTS FOR JSALE
I
10 ACRES OF FRUIT land and sum
mer resort. 70« ft. of Flathead lakeshore.
10 miles from Poison. 4-room mode rn house;
fit» summer cabin. BARBARA WERNER. Foi
son, Montana.
REAL ESTATE
J. C. MORGAN, Missoula, Mont., sells
real property.
FARMS FOR SALE
FORECLOSED RANCHES ON EASY
TERMS
S29 acres In Powell county near Ovando.
Oood Improvements, partly Irrigated. Price
17.500.00.
2 sections near Maudlow. Gallatin county.
Fenced but not otherwise Improved. Appraised
83.200.00. Price, 12.500.00.
I Vs sections adjoining the above, well Im
proved. may be had with It. U desired.
Section and half. Sweet Grass county. Good
buildings, all fenced, spring. Price »6,000.00.
No commissions.
CONRAD KOHRS COMPANY
Helena, Montana
Box 597
EXCEPTIONAL BARGAINS to Rath
drum Prairie. Improved farms as low as
11,000; also cordwood lands, sab-lrrlgatod.
ORXDLEY INVESTMENT CO., Coeur d'Alene.
NORTHERN IDAHO fertile stock and
grain farms near America's natural play
ground. W. K. STACY, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho.
HAY AND STOCK RANCH for sale.
Pleasant Valley. Montana. Write L. O.
MONEY, Marian, Mon tans
IRRIGATED FARMS AND RANCHES.
ARTHUR O. ANDERSON. Bonded Real Es
tât« Dealer. Oolmnbus, Mont
FARMS WANTED
FARMS WANTED—With tbe comple
tion of Fort Peck dam hundreds of runners
win be obliged to move from their Missouri
bottom lands and will be looking for new
»Mations. If you want to seU your farm
advertise It In THE GLASGOW COURIER,
CHasgow. Montana. Covers fort Peek terri
tory completely. Write for rates.
FARMS—HOTELS—STORES
BUSINESS PLACES OF ALL KINDS
for sale. Acreage and farms. 25 acres to 000
crops. Write C. M.
seres, stock,
DOUGLAS. Port Plain, N. T.
LIVESTOCK WANTED
HORSES, CATTLE, SHEEF wanted.
Have 1440 acres of land; will trade any
part of it. Also 1031 Essex car to trad«. B. J
LITTLE, Buffalo, Minn.
STOCK REMEDY
ABORTION—LASTING Immunity one
vaccination. Government licensed; money
bask guarantee. Free abortion literature
Pansen Serum A Supply Do., Dept. It. Kan
sas City. Mo.
ATTENTION STOCKMEN
RN FOE A GOOD COW—«perry's
Lamp Jaw Remedy bas made good cows from
drag stores or send direct to J. 8PERBY CO
■toux Palis. 8. D.
S HIP Y OUR CHICKENS and eggs to
NYSTRAND POULTRY CO , Butte, Montana,
far Top Prises and Prompt Rétama.
K N. A. AUGUST 10. 1S38 (2)
Some men with the clgaret habit also
have the habit of never having
any for
The Sale of Clough Manor
O
.—. . .
Published b» special Arrangement With The
I Chicago Trlbune-Nsw Tort Kew* Syndicate,
Ruth and EUhu had been to auction
sales before but they had never seen
.r
dying to own one of those cabinets
AtÄÄtJ
S3 gSi
you tot a W hiie? I've a hankering to
the oj d place, You'rebet
thing than I am.
«■ * •<- .„J"; '«»• ' ".*
Buy whatever you want to, dearie. I m
001 goin * *° ®® 036An a ® out 11 •
She gave him An understanding took
I know Just how you feel. But Im
scared about pounds mid guineas. I
& et 50 ^^d up."
He grinned encouragement. "Dont !
you worry. I don't think you'll be up
against any high bidding." He looked
hal l enviously at the calm, uninterested
faces gathered about the table. "I don't
believe they care a dam whether they
get what they . re out for or not , ! su p
pose that's wliy they so often get It."
He felt strangely happy at finding
himself in the grounds alone. For the
first time since he had fallen to love
Incorpora ted
Copyright: 1936: By Maso de la Boche
IN TWO FARTS—FART TWO
away
her. He wanted to be alone in this
spot where for many generations his
j fathers had lived and died. He could
fg ;^'j p Ä i ?Äo" h i!Sm r K
™. v JS,g 8 5? th, cÄ«rt ih,re te
now stood. This part was much older
1 than the mairt portion of the house. He
trqr q 1 ryirutt C|lf*A fhftf nroc Tf
^v there were some one atout who
®" aaDout wno
could tell him all its history! i
There Was an old well in the middle,
of the courtyard and the stables seemed
0 nce to have been cloisters. Refresh
ments were on sale in one of these. He
bought a sandwich and ,a cup of coffee
and stood looking about hlm P to a kind
of dream. He pictured his grandfather
as a young man, on just such a fine ;
November morning as this, riding out
with his brothers to the meet of the
hunt, their horses' hoofs clattering on!
these very stones. His imagination
moved to remoter days. A vista of
strange customs opened before him. He
his people to a dim procession,
proud, elegant, courtly, going out to
battle, riding home victorious or de
feated.
There was a chill in the cloisters. He
found himself shivering. He would go
into the sun and see what the other
side of the house was like, explore the
gardens.
He found that the other side was the
front of the house. Its imposing facade
looked serenely across terraced lawns
that were deserted except for himself.
It was queer, he thought, how every
thing seemed to be arranged so that
he could have this solitary communion
with the place. He stood perfectly mo
tionless for a space, staring at the
house, repeopling it with the figures of
the past—his past.
A classic hunter was on either side
of the steps where he stood, on» wrest
ling with a wild boar, the other grasp
ing a stag by the antlers, his hunting
knife in his hand. Something of the
vigor of these heroic stone figures en
s,aw
tered into EUhu. He straightened him
self and a proud smile curved his Ups.
He had a feeling of possession in all
this. A mad thought entered his brain.
Supposing the new Viscount Tarring
died!
ton and his heirs in England
Supposing he himself became the Vis
count Tarrlngton! He pictured Ruth
and himself moving into this great pile,
taking up the responsibility of this es
täte.
And now she was in the auction room
intent cm acquiring a memento of the
helped up tradition of the past! The
life of his family In the new world sud
denly appeared blank as fresh fallen
snow compared to the inscrutable emo
tions that for long centuries had been
absorbed by this air.
He turned away and followed a broad
path between clipped yews to where
he saw the tower of a gmay stone church,
passed through the graveyard and
t into the chill quiet of the church.
If he had felt Isolated within the past
as he stood on the terrace, here he felt
absorbed into its very heart. He was op
pressed by its weight as he walked slow
ly along the aisle toward the chancel.
The stained glass windows threw a
delicate radiance on the recumbent
marble figures on a tomb Inside an iron
grill. He went up the steps and looked
at the tomb. The figures were of a man
and woman In the dress of the day of
Elizabeth. They lay with hands crossed
on their breasts, their faces upturned,
as though for Elihu's inspection. He
bent over the figure of the man with
ß feeling almost of awe as he saw that
the marble face was the face of his
own father, the very face of himself.
After the sale he must bring Ruth here
to see whether his imagination had
played tricks with his good sense. But
it hadn't! He knew it hadn't! He pic
tured himself standing beside the tomb
with closed eyes and folded hands, so
Ruth might be the more impressed by
the resemblance.
I'm a blamed fool, he thought, as
he found that his eyes were blurred.
He could not clearly make out the
Inscription, but the man's name was
Godfrey Tarrlngton. Godfrey—his own
father's name. This Godfrey on the ;
tomb had been the third viscount. j
He examined tablets set In the wall
and In the stone floor, but he did not
find the name EHihu on one of them.
He was disappointed.
looked at his watch and was!
startled to find how much time had;
elapsed since he had left Ruth. He!
must hurry back to her. He went out!
of the church, but he did not hurry!
back to Ruth. He could not bring him
self to pass a tiny cottage he discovered
beyond the churchyard without ex-1
changing a word with the old woman
who was sweeping the dead leaves
from her cobbled path with a besom,
She made such a picture standing there
in front of the thatched cottage and
she gave him a friendly look as though
she wanted him to speak. She was so
very old that he thought perhaps she
would be able to tell him something of
he said, with his
friendly smile. ''You have a pretty little
cottoge here.
Aye, its pretty enough, she re
turned, leaning on her besom and
looking at him curiously.
JTve been having a took around," he
explained.
£ suppose you are come to tbe sale.
there's a lot o' folk yonder to
the trait."
"Yet. My wife and I Happened to be
passing and we thought we'd have a
look to. It's all strange to us. WeTe
Americans,"
He
wen
Bu
"Americans! Well, now, you have
come a long way!" .
"Prom the middle west. Nebraska
I don't suppose you've heard of it."
tnrtp«f U *ir
f tni^Tlomeone
L5"2L ~ mud
SÄjSSJ?«.SÄV^r
about his gr/indfalMr
at first hand.
ht 80 Ir ° m tB "
*2?Ä S3
And his father was, before him. Now
It's my own son. We've worked on this
estate for generations."
•■Vnji'll E_ t
Youli be sorry to see it sold, i
^HS?' «wild* m. red
M| ^J" 2?, S^stortUythe ^OTd «?s
Ætt ft'JÎTin, oT, »nif
permiC- 11 s jseetog the end of every
***£, "• ÏÏ® ^
** lxelp *i
.-T* 1 ® Tarrlngtons were like that,
eh _. ... , — ■-« _
*5 «wîfîf*' tr. ut j,Vf ^heeled
nf
^Jf®V, bes 6110 ha PP lneSB ot
ev
A®, ^ 0t br |"? ber J®" 16
Hi° U v' b H„ l Vv, < î re .*^ t ° n
^ a |,. he to the one that wcnt fco Amer *
"'■» <*»«<1
h "
* h Sλ^ e f
c ^f®fo^- hat re "
lâtlOIl WÄS ll0 tO t-*lC OIQ iOl^Q f
But ^ waa Quite clear in her head.
she gave a scornful laugh. "Him! Him
«um tv n-hwôni nwc mè
rcjy®?. J r B Î3 l S \,"i y
trf^üîA CTnfi*
e was my own brother, EUhu
. öh ? s . craz £: thought Ullhu. She s to
*® r lÄi H She S g0t eVerything mlxed
U P* s&ici
Tt I w 5q e ^f f) ?n" Y mi^ ta ^rrtnoînn y ~w ? ,
T.imngton who
w ^,_ t ?»îîf5i r î5rî' t _ c „ mt .i„ llc i,,
e ®*J® ;stai ^® d
h Si f n y °i n ff
. himself to speak in an off '
, ,, . t . a
llve next door to the
«fi £_??,*
rnernb€ * old gentleman real well,
She
peered inquisitively up at him.
Good Lord, he thought, what if she
sees my resemblance to them!
"What was he like?" she ,asked. "Is
he long dead? What family did he
have?"
"He was a nice old gentleman,
though sort of proud and quiet with
strangers. He's been dead 20 years. He
left one son. He's dead, too."
"All dead, eh?" she repeated sadly.
"All dead. Dear me, that's sad. That's
— sad."
va
• r i'
wonder what put It into that
young Elihu's head to
he said.
She gave him a shrewd look. "He had
his own reasons. But they weren't bad
ones. He wasn't a bad lad. He'd Just
got into the sort of trouble many a
young man does. But the master—that
was the father of the one just dead—
was hot tempered and pretty hard on
go out there,"
him. And my own lather was harder
still—so he left. He flung off to a tem
per and went to America. And he did
well there, too. He wrote to me three
times and he told me he was doing well.
He was engaged to the daughter of a
well-to-do fanner. But he was vexed
with me when I told him what I
thought of him for changing
Hayball was good enough fi
was plain Impudence for him to take
the name of his betters, and so I told
him. And I told him he'd no right to
a girl under a false name. He
go to Jail for it, I told him. He
was vexed at that and he never wrote
to me again."
EUhu asked thoughtfully, "Why do
you suppose he changed his name?"
"Wefl, he was always an uppish lad.
He liked fine ways and fine names.
And I think he had a feeling that if he
took the old lord's name he was getting
even with him for the injustice he
thought he had done him. He'd never
liked the name Hayball. He was an odd
his name,
or him. It
~ _
that the real cause of thalr
may be tired kidney«. _
Wdn *V "fw 0 *
*** w*T» of taJdag Uy aeMe aaj
H
»*** **
P? *
* " dl " T teb " ■"*
a.% Wlth fw-> *
ofrerTamart and bum. the
nil I— of kidney tu bee may need fioett
iny got. This danger signal may be
Sto beginning ofnag*ln* baekaohei,
i» peine loee of pep and e ner gy, get
ttog op night*, «wetting, fmfflneee»
dar tbe eyes, beedaebee and
Don't wait for serious troubla Aid
your druggist ter Doan's Pills —
___ . _
for over 4* yean by militons
people. They give happy relief i
wlll heJp flush out the U w i l es
kidney tubes Get Doan's FUla.
marry
might
lad
Still EUhu was unconvinced. He
could not bring himself to beUeve this
of his grandfather. Yet it sounded
straight enough. He said;
"I don't suppose you have ,a picture
of your brother? rd be interested to
see if I could recognize in it the old
gentleman I remember."
"Indeed, I have, sir. Come in and
111 gladly show It to you." She led
the way Into the low oak beamed room.
From the drawer of a dresser she took
an old lacker box and out of It the yel
lowed photograph of a young man.
EUhu recognised to it the duplicate of
one he possessed. His father had had
this photograph
It hung now in
He had f
enlarged and framed.
Elihu's own home,
orgotten how time was pass
ing. He might have stayed longer to
talk with the old woman but a clock
above the fireplace struck one. Ruth
would wonder what on earth had be
come of him. He felt very unreal. He;
looked into the face of the old woman
who was his aunt and saw in it a gro
tesque likeness of the face of Viscount
Tarrlngton on the tomb in the church.
MANY NEVER
SUSPECT CAUSE
OF BACKACHES
TU* Old Tr«Hnw*o» Oft««!
Briags Happy fUAo# Of Palm
Many sufferers rolls vs oacflafl
backache quickly, osow they fliaoovwv
with scanty
..
I m :
Its funny," he said. "It's funny
but you look like the Tarr logions
yourself. You look like that figure in
the church."
She gave a low chuckle. Her eyes be
"Queer things happen in old
you know," she said. "My
had. sometime ln the old days, had a
fancy for a orettv Havball maid w
T,'^ rh fi 1 [ f p î®' m AiV°hu SS r«-ufo in 'îh.î
pI ^i hl £* VL of m&s^!
P j( ^®
Sion. He was no longer one With the
Tarrlngton family. He had no real
ri!fht 10 the name he bore. EUhu Hay
bal1 • • • Hlhu Hayball . . He said it
over and over as he walked slowly
a i one the mth But there was no
dou " about it . . . the blood of the
Arringtons did run in their veins
^ ief e was no mistaking the likeness,
And, though he had lost the family, he
had gained the land. It was as though
the fQg had risen ^ b i ot out lts vision
of Clough manor, leaving him only the
M of the land beneath his feet, the
shapes of the oaks and beeches about
his th Q {hl land Hm0 ng these
tree s. his fathers had worked, rolling
the grass, planting saplings, pruning
m &
¥
jL 1
"J
K*
ill
%
...if you watch your diet, exercise sensibly, live moderately
... And, if you drink, choose a whiskey that agrees with you.
F OR months we have examined this vital ques
tion, "How docs the human system respond to
different forms of whiskey?"
The findings of a group of trained, impartial,
fact-finding men engaged by the House of Seagram
have conclusively proved that " Seagram's Crown
Blended Whiskies are A Most Wholesome Form
of Whiskey.
5 CROWN
Therefore, you who have always liked the fine,
rich taste of Seagram's Crowns now know why
these whiskies agree with you so well.
Blended with Seagram skill from one of the
world's largest stores of fine aged whiskies, Sea
gram's Crowns, if taken in moderation, are your
assurance of pleasure without penalty.
CSeagram-Dislillers Corp.—Executive Offices; New York
7 CROWN
n
Seagram's Five Crown Blended Whiskey. The straight whiskies in this product are S yean
or more old, 25% straight whiskey and 75% neutral spirits distilled from American grain.
Bottled under this formula since May 1956. 90 Proof
Seagram's Seven Crown Blended Whiskey. The straight whiskies in this product are 9 yean
or more old, 37*/,% straight whiskies and 62*/j% neutral spirits distilled from American
grain. Bottled under this formula ante* May 1956. SKI Proof
$105
I PINT
$130
I PINT
ill!
T
S
i
sjj
Toas pointing to ourFauily's Wltbkey
being sent over
This bera picture shows the throw
of aa last waak-and when w*
place
|pv
was op visiting Mate of oar re
lation». It'» Tom la front and then
my brother William.
Tom'a hollering at Barney
Wright "Hey, what you gat
there?" Barney claims be*» got
Wilkea Family Whiskey
I customers than any other», and
I Barney's got a good trade with
I a mighty fine class of people.
Harry E. Wilkea
-
WT-.
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p>./i
iW.
i ; X j
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Sk#
iky***',

'irfm
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mm
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••

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mm
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■ ■

Our own Family's Whiskey
folks are fast finding out how they can enjoy
the same whiskey as us distillers!
It can't be just how little money everybody is charged for J
our Family's Whiskey that's making folks so excited over h. K
You just like what we distillers like in our whiskey. You like V
tastiness and something just as smooth as can be—so it just I
sort of oozes down your throat. \
Well, you're getting just the same as us! The Wilken I
Famjly Whiskey has got everything that Dad and us and 1
Grandad ever found out concerning making whiskey extra 1
tasty and smooth. And you can count on this here Family's |
Recipe of ours always being just
one way —the way you like it! ^
AT ALL STATK STORES
m
«
i\ WHI****
kVa.^* **• *•"***
86.« proof—Tbe
n
29
I T9
grain n*u«r«l spirits. S% straight wMafeev 4 yaara
2056 straight vsblsbey 19 months old.
Copyright 1936. Jos. 8. Finch A Co., loc . Schmier. Pa.
% mmsm
* . .. K f. N«. F A M ■ Y
TH I
sowing seeds For generations they bad
knelt In the church yonder.
"T ™
SÄSÄÄ SÄ£'S
anxious lor the reality of her presence
after this fantastic delving into the
But, as he was pissing the court
called to him. He found
-»■».I
yard, her voloeH
her eating an enormous sugared bun
out of her hand. Her face was
How stylish she looked,
all these women In
with happiness,
ne thought, among
their tweeds, with
their heavy shoes
and woolen stockings, and no powder
••
It's DOUBLE
SMOOTH
and Half the Priced
says ED HACKETT
' VE tried a lot of whiskies #% _
and say—Kinggocsdown fll| c „
twice as easy! It costs just - •
half what you'd guess, QUART*15°
which makes it my price." c«*rw«. m LÎxV • ^
MOWN-FORMAN Distillery COMPANY. LoutsnlU, Kentucky ftk.
PINT
/
,4n

i
I
-v.
Ul#]
"Were you worried about me, (bur
Ul S£!Ji 8 "*"£• , . „
ThftSne _
s?; Uke " 4 »• "•
a pr
thui
things I've bought! And at such
ce! I rn not going to tell you any
r about them. Just wait until you
hem! Do get yourself one of these
buns. They taste perfectly delicious. I
suppose that's just because I'm so
. EUhu. to think that
happy . . . O
well
havè your own family silver—your own
family furniture—to our home! Life's
just too marvelous!"
—THE END—
<8>
If vou have been drinking, don't drive.

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