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Montana oil and mining journal. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1931-1953, May 21, 1938, Image 4

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/Journal
A-Wa
PUBLISHED WEEKLY
ESTABLISHED 1921
Owned and published by the Montana Oil Journal, a Montana corporation.
Address all communications to 618 First National Bank Building,
Orest Falla, Montana. O. I. DoS CHON, publisher
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
|S.00 Per Year in Advance—Canada and Foreign Subecrlptlons $2.60,
$1.26—6 Months. Foreign $1.76—6 Months.
Published Every Saturday.
Entered as Second Class Matter. April 23, 1921, at the Post Office at
Great Falls, Montana.—Under Act of March 3. 1879.
Per Year.
The Montana Oil & Mining Journal endeavors to insure the honesty
and trustworthiness of every advertisement it prints and avoid the
publication of all advertisements containing misleading statements
or claims.
ADVERTISING HATES ON APPLICATION
Fred ^Plymlaje, Townsend; Erma
Lust, Kalispell; Elizabeth Mosser,
Chinook; Marion Johnson, Chinook:
Vivian Bainuard, Beverton; Thos.
, Darland, Froid; Louise Behmerwold,
Heron; Robert Krueger, Bozeman:
Merced« Nelson Shelby nnd Joyce
Hendcrcon, stevennylllc.
BULLETIN NO. 29
(Continued from Page One)
Local judges were William Black,
attorney and former superintendent
of Shelby schools; and Mr. and Mrs.
George Downs, the latter formerly
of the staff of w' n '
nesota S'yate judges were Mrs.
Rex Haight, wife of the deputy
superintendent of public instruc
tion; Mrs. John Erickson, wife of
Al her t ° Roher is.^mayor' of" Helena"'
Foiiowing is Mildred's Prize
wîning essay:
MONTANA PEOPLE
MONTANA OIL FOR
By Mildred Anderson
Of the many different sourc
es of Montana wealth, oil is
now perhaps the most import
ant. Everyday it is used in
cars, in trucks and in machin
ery'; besides being valuable as
an export. We can help to
develop this industry by buying
Montana crude oil products.
There is in Montana a great
need for sale of oil. Just re
cently we lost, to a Canadian
competitor, our entire sale to
the Dominion of Canada. Be
cause of this loss, the excess oil
has had to be stored, increasing
the loss on sales by the expense
of storage. As this oil is not
selling, the price is going down,
wells are being closed, men are
losing jobs, and the entire oil
industry is threatened.
The oil from these wells of
Montana, scattered from the
boundary of Canada to Wyom
ing, is of the best possible qual
ity. The oil and cracked gas -
refined in the modern Montana
Refineries is equal to any in
the United States. That in the !
Cat Creek wells is found to
i ,
nave as little asphalt and lube
Oil as to he usable in Diesel
engines without refining.
It would take almost a book
to describe the types of employ
ment provided by the oil indus
try'. In the first place there is
m
PARAFFIN SOLVENT
DOWELL INCORPORATED
SHELBY, MONTANA
Telephone 133
•R»gi»t*rtdU. & Patent Offlc«
■*
DOWELL
eS
RECIPE FOR BETTER CAR
Arro
Gasoline
PERFORMANCE
I
x
ArroyL
Gas Æ
è
V
ii
IT'S "70" OCTANE
FULL OF POWER
NOW
TREA TED
WITH
TETRAETHYL
"A HOME PRODUCT
AS GOOD AS THE BEST"
Oil j REFINING COMPANY
LEWISTOWN, MONTANA
needed on each oil field a great j
number of men to work as dril-j
lers, repairmen, inspectors, iron
workers p j pe fitters, welders, I
rn e f >u an jes ea mente rs land i
mecnaniCS, carpenters. a ,
pumpers, besides truckers or;
railroad men. A refinery em-j
1 p l 0 y S pipefitters, mechanics,-!
carpenters painters, chemists,
guagers, stillmen. firemen, elec
tricians, clerks, salesforce, fore
men, and truckers or railroad
meT1
supports thousands of workers
"
The spending of money earn
ed by these men affects directly
or indirectly, almost every :
other form of business in Mon
tana. Oil workers cannot pur
chase food, clothing and furni
ture without helping the farm
ers, the ranchmen, the mer
chants and the manufacturers.
In short, the oil industry
As oil wells are highly taxed,
these taxes are helping Mon
tana to grow and to expand, i
They make it possible to build |
the highways, schools, and in
stitutions, the citizens of Mon- 1
tana have always prized. Since |
it is possible to help indirectly |
the improvements of our state I
merely by buying oil produced
of Montana, why not buy them?
We would be ungrateful in
deed if we did not answer Mon
tanans call for help when one
of her greatest industries is in
danger.
If we are to help cultivate
home industry, give employment j
to Montana citizens, help Mon- j
tana business grow, and make
money to further the building ;
up of the state we honor and
love, we must not only talk, but
begin now to buy Montana oil
and gasoline.
STATE JOINS UNIT
In compliance with the supreme
court decision approving the uni
tization of state school lands in
* as fields Nanita b. Sherlock of the
f Iand i b ° afd hw taed a con
solidated lease to Glacier Produc
tion company at Cut Bank for ■ Si
natural gas development. The state ^
win have 480 acres of state land ^
1>00 . 1<sd , with Priv»tely-owned land m
unde I_ ^ . totaling 2208 acres -jJ
m
SEND A CONTRIBUTION TO
THE SUNBURST BADGER
► -
àiaburj
If all the boarders in all the
boarding houses were placed aide
by side at one table, they'd reach.
'Jfaàéer
The Pioneers Had No Such Opportunity
HE real history of Montana oil
development is a matter of the
future rather than the past.
The past contains the story of the
beginnings—of the years of pros
pecting and experimentation. The
serious business of the oil industry
is yet to come.
The real history will be written
around three factors :
1. Deep drilling.
2. Geophysics.
3. Improved drilling methods.
Any man who has a dollar invest
ed in Montana oil should take time
to study carefully into these factors.
We believe that anyone who does
examine the facts carefully will see
his way clear to make himself a lot
of money.
In our recent Bulletin No. 473C we
briefly discussed these factors and
gave a general outline which fur
nishes food for thought and investi
gation. Recently, we have discussed
in this column something of the
market situation. That is a prime
factor. Glancing back at the past,
w r e find that Montana has never had
a stable market for its crude. The
crude market has been a day-to-day,
hand-to-mouth proposition ruled by
the uncertainty on the one hand
that there was enough crude avail
able to take care of a stable market
demand; and on the other hand a
uncertainty whether the next week
or the next month or the next year
would see a market for developed
supplies of crude.
Now' that the Canadian domination
of the market is removed, Montana
producers know for the first time
that there will be a definite market
next week, next month and next
year for a certain number of bar
rels of crude. Whether that figure
be higher or lower than in the past
it is for the first time a certain
market. Present refineries and
those building or contemplated will
take a definite number of barrels
of crude per annum FROM MON
TANA OIL FIELDS. There will be
no substitution of ;other crudes.
There will be no market rocking.
For the first time we can see STA
BILITY in the market for petroleum
products, and this market is cer
tain to GROW, because of the' ad
vantageous location of Montana oil
fields.
Then last w'eek we discussed the
possibility of production in horizons
below the top of the Madison lime.
We know that if no wells in Turner ■
Valley were drilled below the top
of the Madison lime that there
would be no Turner Valley oil field.
We know that if there were no dril
ling below the Madison or Missis
sippi lime in New Mexico that
there would be no great amount of
crude in that state today,
same thing is true in the Midconti
nent.
If it is true elsew'here that the top
of the big lime IS THE BEGIN
NING OF THE BIG OPPORTUNI
TIES FOR PRODUCTION, then
why is it not equally true in Mon
tana?
We have seen the history of the •
famous Ohio-Baker No. '3 well. We
now have the spectacle of the Ar
onow-Government well which seems
to have tapped a vug or fissure such
as made possible the Ohio-Baker
No. 3. We know from the best of
T
production engineers that this oil IS
NOT CONTAINED IN THE FOR
MATION TAPPED BY THIS
WELL. The material which blew
out of the Aronow well was non
porous and not capable of yielding
up oil as does a true oil sand.
It has been established be
yond any possible doubt, to the
satisfaction of every petroleum
engineer who has made a
study of Montana oil fields,
that this oil IS COMING FROM
BELOW. If it is coming from
lower horizons, does it not
seem probable that there IS
MORE OIL REMAINING IN
LOWER HORIZONS?
We cannot help but feel that his
tory will repeat itself in Montana oil
fields as it has in other oil states
where deep drilling has been done. g
IF the source of our oil is in lower
formations, and IF operators can lo
cate the structural conditions in low
er formations, it goes without say
ing that operators are going to drill
fbr that oil. They will find greater
rock pressure with depth. They will
doubtless have large flowing wells
for that has been the history of
other states and of Alberta, where
deep drilling has been <jone.
Is it not apparent that the man
who owns a royalty on a farm in
Kevin-Sunbursf * fiel d 'today has
greater possibilities before him than
anyone has en joyrofrr"tfifc past? We
recall the story of Spindletop oil
field, which was a spectacular pro- be
ducer at shallow depth. The produc- ü
tion declined and the field went off
to nothing. The royalty owner on
that field who kept his royalty sim
ply was unable to sell it or give it
away. Everyone thought the field
ready for abandonment. Then came
deep drilling. The lower sands have
produced more than the upper sands,
and the true production history of
Spindletop lays in the productive
history of the deep sands. We be- ||
lieve the same will be true of North
Montana oil fields.
Oddly enough, the average per
son does not realize these simple
facts. Most people think that when
the oil at the Madison lime is ex
hausted that Kevin-Sunburst will be
abandoned. We ourselves base our
Eg
1
i
i
M
One of the attempted deep tests
in Kevin-Sunburst field encountered
oil at the "great depth," as we call
it, of 3390 feet. But it was not
the same kind of oil that is found
in the main field. In the producing
wells which yield oil at the top of
the lime the oil is asphaltic base.
The oil found in the Frazer-Rice
deep test" at 3390 feet was green
oil, high gravity, similar to Turner
Valley crude. Is it at all probable
that the few barrels of oil that
belched out of the Frazer-Rice well
before the terrific gas pressure
wrecked the hole, was ALL the oil
existing below the big lime? None
in the world would vouchsafe that
statement.
It follows that since Turner Val
ley gets its production from the
lower part of the Madison lime, it
would be a good guess that some oil Ktl . „ -, _
will likewise be found in the lower
ar ' of the Madison lime m Kevin- o( the Madi80n | ime> erratic as we
know them to be. At the same time,
when we buy a royalty on 320 acres
we get not only a part of the oil
at the top of the lime but also
in any and all productive horizons
in the lime and in the Devonian and
other formations on down to the g
granite core of the earth. Today a 0
royalty may be earning a few pen- p
nies but with deep drilling this Ü
same royalty may be earning a hun- p?
dred times as much.
With 15 years to study this sit- ||
uation, we consider most fortunate jp
the investor who can come in today ||
and buy royalties. The man who 0
bought royalties back in 1922 had to H
take tremendous odds, because the -fe
sciences on which we depend for our ||
future were not known. There was ||
no possibility of locating structures,
faults and other structural features p
through geophysics; there was no p
drilling equipment to economically M
test horizons below the lime even p
if the oil were known to be present; S
there was no such thing as acidiza- Ig
tion which makes one hole as ef- ii
fective as several holes of the ol- jig
den days.
It was not the pioneers who were
lucky; it is the third generation in- M
vestor who comes in today and buys ^
royalties on such a basis that the
production ABOVE the lime will
pay out and pay a profit, with the
lower sand possibilities awaiting—
fortunately—to make the really
great fortunes of Montana oil his
' tory.
Sunburst. It does not seem prob
able that Mother Nature would de
posit oil below the big lime in New
Mexico, in Wyoming and in Alberta
a"d not in Montana, which has more
oil at the too of the linte than has
Alberta. Alberta development was
held back for years by the theory
that no oil could be expected from
horizons below the top of the Madi
son lime. But Alberta had to drill
so much deeper to reach the TOP
of the Madison lime that the drillers
had modern equipment with which
to penetrate the lime,
that Turner Valley has become one
of the world's maior oil fields:
through drilling to depths of 7.000
feet to penetrate the lower part of
the Madison limestone.
The Madison limestone is around
POO fpet thick in Kevin-Sunburst
field. It offers hard drilling for
cable tools. No rotary has ever at
tempted to cut throucrh it. The for
mations in Turner Valley are just
as hard, however, for it is identi
cal massive limestone, and Turner
Valley rotary drillers are able to drill
through the Madison lime without
trouble.
m
So it was
ÎS
The
It follows that the day is
coming when someone is going
to get equipment suitable for
drilling through the Madison
lime in Kevin-Sunburst and oth
er north Montana oil fields.
The depth of any one of the
producing wells in Turner Val
ley oil field would test not on
to the Madison lime but all the
formations down to and includ
ing the Ordovician, which is the
horizon of the greatest of all
producing formations on the
continent—the Wilcox sand.
1
Persons interested in more ex
plicit facts along this line are in
vited to write to us or call on us.
The attached coupon will bring
our current publications to enquir
ers. *
m
9

Landowners
Royalties Co.
Box 1225
LANDOWNER'S ROYALTIES COMPANY
Great Falla, Montana.
Please send current publications of your organiza- ;
tion (Membership $1.) *
E
&
(Your Name In Full)
m
HEAD OFFICE :
GREAT FALLS. MONTANA
Ç5I
Wi.

Ip
Ducks ud Ducks
A salesman was rattling along a
country road in eastern Tennessee,
when he came to a ford. A darky
was standing by the llttl e stream
where some ducks were swimming.
The salesman said: "Can I get
through the creek with this car all
iflght?'' "Yes. suh, ^rlr© right
through.»' The salesman, thus en
couraged, drove into the stream,
only to Und that the water was so
deep that it flooded his engine. He
and his companion had to get out
into the stream with the cold water
up to their armpits and push the
car to the bank. The salesman
/turned to the negro and slaid
anpri,y: da you mean by tel -
me * ba * Ï could drive through
that creek? 'Well, boss, 1 nevuh
knew dat water was so deep. It
only comes half-way up on my
ducks!''
Smith; "But dear, I am labe for
dinner because I have had my nose
to the grindstone all day.**
Mrs. Smith: "Wefll, you «had
better get a grindstone that doesn't
leave face powder, rouge and lip
stick all over yon.'*
There was a young lady of kent
Who said that she knew what It
meant
When men asked her to dine,
Gave her cocktails and wine
She knew what it meant- but
she went.
OUR SENTIMENTS
This business of thinking up Jokes ■
Has got us a little bit daunted.
The ones yon want, we can't print
And the ones we print aren't wanted.
NEW PIPE USED
for Every Purpose
OUR ODKB FOR HIGH
RB88URB OIL AND GAS LINES
Also Well Casing
IF IN URGENT NEED OF A
QUOTATIONS. WIRE COLLECT
JOS. GREENSPON'S
SON PIPE CORP.
National Stock Tarda
(St. Clair Co.) ILL.

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