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Montana oil and mining journal. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1931-1953, May 21, 1938, Image 6

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075103/1938-05-21/ed-1/seq-6/

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LARGER ACREAGE
OF BEETS PLANNED
PONDERA COUNTY AND SUN BTVER
PROJECT FARMERS AFTER
SUGAR FACTORY
Meeting at Conrad Results In Move to
r-JÜÜL _» plant Rome
Induce Construction of Piant Some
where in Area; Crop Tour Will B*
Made at End of July.
__
A p i?" of joint action to bring
about construction of a beet sugar
factory in the Pondera and Cas
cade county area, regardless of to
cation, was announced following 1 a
meeting of directors of the Pondera
County Sugar Beet Growers asso
elation and of the Sun River Sugar
Beet Growers association, held at
Conrad,
that the only sure way to bring about
construction of a factory in this re
gion was to produce a tonnage of
sugar beets greater than can be handled
by present facilities, and definite steps
to create such a condition were jointly
decided upon.
As a factor in bringing about the)
needed increase in acreage to be sown ;
to beets in this region, it was decided
to sponsor a crop tour at the end of !
July, to take In principal sugar beet j
areas in Montana and In the upper!
Snake river valley in Idaho, with Yel-|
lowstone park a probable recreational
stopping point enroute. It was Indi- !
cated at the meeting that about 75 j
would make the tour.
It was agreed that both associations |
will commence an immediate campaign j
to sign up more good land for sugar 1
beet planting in 1939. It was asserted ;
at the meeting that but little more need !
be sown to beets to overtax the capa- !
city of the beet sugar factory of the |
Utah-Idaho Sugar Co. at Chinook. !
Sentiment of the meeting was that,
only by increasing tonnage to the point
desired can construction of another,
fartorv he assured
factory he assured.
group a-lso v °t ed n P ^?. va 1
the plan of the Great Falls Chamber
of Commerce to hold another sugar
beet field day this fall, and named
a committee representative of each as-•
Hie
sedation, to work with chamber of
ficials in preparing the premium list.
A. W. Walker, manager of the Sun
river irrigation project at Fairfield,
told Great Palls Rotarians that he was
confident that when the sugar beet!
production in the Great Falls district!
becomes of sufficient proportions to!
demand a sugar factory, a factory will
be built in the district.
While last year but 237 acres on the,
Sun river project were devoted to beets.
this year there will be about 1,500 acres,
Walker said. The Sim river irrigation!
project was first conceived in a vague
way by a Helena group in 1894 and!
recommended by the biological survey!
in 1903.
'rvia ir, », M ,i„ _ „I
The project in its early years came
near being abandoned by the réclama
tlon bureau because of the opposition
of certain groups of farmers vritton its
arntint? 3 ,oT^iv,17°
A -^îif y dld
not need irrigation to raise crops.
The project has been going ahead to
recent years by leaps and bounds. The!
big appropriations began in 1933. There
are now about 70,000 acres under thej
ditch. Gibson dam is being raised to;
provide 16,000 acre feet of additional
extended on!
water; laterals are be
the Sun river slope division. About)
17,000 acres on that division late this!
fall or early to 1939 will be open to
homestead filing.
••
CHITTENDEN QUITS
AT STATE COLLEGE!
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY PROFESSOR!
RESIGNS TO TAKE POSITION
IN EAST
_
Will Become Livestock Field Represen
tative for Corn Belt Farm Publica- |
lions. President Strand of Montana I
Institution Has Announced.
Prof. D. W. Chittenden, head of
the Montana State college animal
Jan.
1, 1934, has resigned to become
livestock field representative for
com belt farm publications, it is '
announced by A L Strand, presi- !
dent of Montana State college. The
announcement of Professor Chit
tenden's successor will be made
later.
He plans to leave Bozeman some
time to June to take up his new work.
His headquarters will be In K any»*
City and he will travel out of there
representing about four different I
papers.
As head of the State college depart
ment. Professor Chittenden directed all
animal husbandry work, including re-i
search for the Montana agricultural
experiment station, and teaching. Hej
came here from the University of Mis- I
souri, succeeding the late Louis Vtoke. ;
During his four-year term here. Pro- I
fessor Chittenden has made marked!
improvements to his departments,
to Dr. Strand. These are head
ed by improvement to college livestock
which won many awards at leading
shows of the nation and is the prin
cipal factor to the excellence of student
judging teams. He also added a wool
laboratory and a new meats course
for animal husbandry student train
ing. The department's physical
ties also were improved under
rection.
Improvements to college livestock
during Professor Chittenden's term re
sulted in their earning more than
$2,500 in premiums, seven head were
named grand champions, six cham
pions, two reserve champions; they

ac
ror
faclll
his dl
HAPPY RELIEF
FROM PAINFUL
BACKACHE
Caused by lured Kidneys
Many of thoaa «nawin«, n.«iji f , panful
nu» »«I « « peopla bUme on odd* or «traita
C » of tan «Biuad by «»rod kidney«—and
JMliarad when treated in the right way.
ThaJddnays are Natwe'aohief way of taking '
I .aida and potaoanue waste out of the
r Moat people pane »boat 3 pints a day sr
III pound» at wants,
ft« If milaa of kldnej
n.»y
tubs« and SHsn
matter stay»
may start nagglac 1
, low o t pap and
»
» rweiung, punUMW
ntoBlrfpfffr«» lod dluttM.
'ÄSTyvm Aniwtat lor î w ,
■■VIE
„roar
rm
C3TJ2
Western Life Names Schultz
Superintendent of Agencies
Andy (A. T.) Schultz, who quit the
public utility business in 1935 to en
gage in life Insurance selling with the
Î Western Life Insurance Co., has been
appointed superintendent of agencies
I for Montana to assist in the training
Qf new men and the establishment ofj
new agencies.
His work will give Mr. Schultz an
j opportunity to renew many friendships
i over the state he made when he was
(managing public utilities; eight years;
at Helena, and then three years at
, Kara and Great Falto.
Selection of Mr. Scnultz for tnls
important position was in recognition
; of the exceptionally fine record he
made since entering upon life insurance
selling in 1935," said R. B. Richardson,
r- • «; ■» ■ « ■ ■»yjy «' . ■ î -xawrgpw
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A. T. "Andy" SCHULTZ
_., . ... , ...
P 1 esident of the Western Life. The
volume of new insurance he placed
and its quality bracket him with
to P life insurance agents of the
country "
-, „ . , ...
1 Q ?î r ' w î^. e f u ^^ y ^
in b y a P9 em he
y
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mmmm
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mm
:h
the
3J ? sw 5 r , a / rom . a
; M° 1 3, tar î a _ frlenc ^. h< ^, be
j i^ed Texas. Th e Exile s
| Answer , it is given here,
j , T ... ... _ , „
d ,° country,
f 01 by alright
damn Empire Builders
Monday î] ig , hts
Weren t always remindln
9L t v .. b f£ te l r , stam piii .ground
I 5 ,aJs r?, that homesick feelin
^ ngs t , bat , , car * 1 ^ found
„J^P 1 M P I ?. ta i 1 ?-,
I r f 1 ?. aun >
£ nd folks find time to live some,
wed as play the game,
I
Now work and me ain't strangers
But when I lived un there
I could«irn mv bLm ^id bacon
Ajto still^w ^im^to smre
s? d found life w^th thfulin'
And P leasures ^arn't unknown
Huntin' and fishto' and campin',
W lth friends I'm proud to own;
Real square shootin' white men,
Who were ready with a stake
To keep a pardner goto'
If he had a rotten break,
I ain't forgot the many times
We've camped beside a stream
Our bedrolls spread on fir boughs
In the camp fire's shifting gleam.
And wrapped up to our sougans
Our roof with stars ashtoe.
We listened to the night wind
A stogin' to the pine.
Until sleep overtook us
And then the first we knew.
The sun was up adryin'
Our tarps all wet with dew.
I ain't forgot the breakfasts
Nor the ever changin' scene
As we dropped our flies on water
Crystal clear or bluish green.
Each riffle worth the whlppta',
Each hole a promised fight.
With a trout to make your blood
race,
And haunt your dreams at night.
Such days seemed short, as slowly
Back to camp we made our way,
Stoppln' to try Just one more hole
Tore callin' it a day.
I ain't forgot the momta's
When climbin' through the cold,
We stopped to watch the sunrise
Paint the mountain tops with gold.
Nor when huntin' on the ridges
We startled to the whir
Of blue grouse, at our footsteps,
Seekto' cover to the fir.
Nor when creepto' through green
timber,
We tried to draw a bead
On blacktail buck a leavin'
The country at full speed.
It's hell to be an exile.
But some day thtogs'll change
And I'll hightail for Montana
To ride the old home range.
See the mountains where to
summer,
The plumes of bear grass grow
On the side hill, which to winter
Is drifted deep with snow.
Peel again the sort of friendship
That warms me all unspent
By years and miles between us
And then I'll be content.
won 48 first places, 33 seconds as well
as numerous other awards. These win
nings were made at livestock shows held
in Montana, Oregon, Utah, Colorado,
Kansas and Illinois.
By having such high quality livestock
to study, student teams also earned
a long list of winnings. At shows held
at Ogden, Utah, student livestock Judg
ing teams won one first, two third and
one fourth place. At Chicago they met
the best to the nation, yet won ninth,
sixteenth and nineteenth. Dairy cattle
judging teams placed second and
fourth at Portland.
Student enrollment to animal hus
bandry under Professor Chittenden in
creased more than 400
Enthusiastic about
rcent.
new work.
Professor Chittenden says he leaves
Montana with a feeling of regret be
cause the "livestock men of this state
are the finest group
ever worked with."
pei
his
of men I have
HEAVY SNOWS DELAYING
OPENING OF LOGAN PASS
Recent heavy snowfall is among
factors which will make ft imprac
ticable to open the Logan paw road
earlier than June 10, according to
E. T. Scoyen. Glacier park super
intendent.
"There is none more anxious
than the park officials to get Logan
pass opened at the earliest date,"
—yen said. "However, with pres
ent funds and equipment, we are
going to be hard poshed to make
It by Jane 15.
Read the ChuuitMt AdwtHhmmtoJlm
DEBENTURE PLAN
FOR ROAD MONEY
j
;
|
|
! Move Necessary to Raise Fonds With
! Wh ich to Match Federal Aid Appro
; _ p ._
pirations for Highway Purposes or
; Opportunity to Benefit Will Be Lost
j
|
i COMMITTEE PROPOSES TO SUB
MIT MATTER TO PEOPLE IN
INITIATIVE MEASURE
Possibility that a new series of
highway
back afl
retired, might be issued to assist
the state in matching federal fonds
for highway construction during
the next three years, was the sag
gestion "most favorably considered"
at a meeting of the state committee
on highway financing beaded by
Harry J. Kelly of Kalis pell.
The committee met in Gov. Roy E.
Ayers' reception room at the state
capital and elected L. J. Onstad of;
Broadus chairman and George Shepard
of Missoula, secretary.
Chairman Onstad said the suggestion
that a new series of debentures be
issued "seemed to be the most favor-1
ably considered proposal to be placed
before the committee."
The plan would be inaugurated by!
an initiative proceeding at the general
election this coming November, he said,
and the first repayments would not
be made until 1942 or 1943.
The state's present outstanding de
bentures are to be paid back by Deoem
ksuance of the new debentures
would bring new money to the high
way department and really would be a
form ofpromissory note, providing for
Installment repayment to the pur
chasers of the debentures," Chairman :
had 6 beentirli
Z J? at J?S}L
delkent lires, to be paid
ter carrent debentures are
be
Ä tLS'Â'ïïÆ
at the end of 1941 The three-cent* a
gallon tax would "be amnle" to nav for
the additional debentures, he said
Any increase in the nresent raaollnp
tax "is absolutely out," Chairman On
stad said. He explained Montana al
ready has been criticized for having
high-priced gasoline and any addition-i
al tax would lose thousands of dollars
X Murist money " "• ** te each
e pIS C i , hXtheX 1 Ä W SJ,'g;!
Some committee members appeared
to favor the establishment of a ton
Ç 111 , 6 .tax and a passenger-mile tax on
freight and passenger service in the
state, but the group as a whole felt
institution of such taxes would be
matters for consideration by the state
legislature.
The debenture plan calls for an ini
tlatlve to be voted on at the general
election in November under authority
of which up to $3,000,000 in gasoline
tax anticipation debentures could be
issued. Federal aid credited to Mon
tana must be matched or It will be lost,
It was recommended to launch an
Immediate campaign to obtain the
necessary signatures for the initiative
petitlons, which, it is said, must be filed
with the secretary of state by July 7.
The committee recommended an
other initiative through which $500,
a yey of Income from liquor would
be diverted during the next biennium
tomatch federal money for feeder
ads.
Onstad named a committee consist
ing of Sen. Fred Robinson of Malta,
2*0*8» R. Shepard of Missoula and
W. R. Church of Helena as a commit
tee to supervise the circulating of pe
titions for the two initiatives. Signa
tures of 8 percent of the registered
voters in at least two-fifths of the
counties is required before an initiative
measure can be put on the ballot. It is
said about 18,000 signatures will be
required.
Hie
larger group, known as the
mlttee of 57, met several weeks
com
ago.
As a result of this session Chairman
Kelly appointed the committee of 12
Hie smaller group decided to submit
Itss recommendations by man to the
membership of the larger unit. If the
recommendations are approved the
campaign for signatures will be
launched immediately.
BUTTE'S TOWN CLOCK
IS SHOWING ITS AGE
The city hall clock Is "all tired out.
Butte officials shook their heads to
sorrow as they reached that decision
after trying to vain to coax it into
action
., Th e familiar old timepiece in the
city hall tower has been a faithful
servant for about 30 years but lately
behavior has been strange. Never
will it run more than two or three
hours a day and It starts and slope
Without warning **
All of which Is very confusing to the
hundreds who have come to depend
on It and daily glance up to get the
time. Recently the big clock was
cleaned and overhauled but attention
only seems to make It lazier. Now the
tog hands may stop for a day or so
tetore deciding to ^move on" again.
Officials have called to an expert
f 110 aW£dtin g the findings of his
investigation. It may be that the clock
will have to be retired or left to the
tower as a timeless timepiece.
'■
New Finien
HOTEL, BUTT*
Mont. Fire pros!
with all ootsidf
rooms.
Rates: **.$• and up.
H otel t^ajnbow
E *Ä4i^ D >
MONTANA'S DI3TTRCTTVX BOBTILtI
GRAZING TRACT
25.066 Acres at $3 Per Awe
AGRICULTURAL LANDS
In the Clark's Feck volley
s t
tot. Par further
Anaconda Copper Mining Co.
Lands
Drawer IMS
t
Colonel Doris

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V AJWJlTOV rQlïNTY
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DD A ÏFfT AI/ AVI?!!
I IIU JILL 1 U1VA 1 Hill
-
SWAMP CREEK WATER STORAGE
ENTERPRISE CONSTRUCTION
TO BE STARTED SOON
Doris Qualn tance, Boulder, co-ed
at Montana State University, has
been elected co-ed colonel of the
Grizzly battalion for 1938-39. In
1935, as a Senior to Boulder high
school, she was chosen the most
beautiful girl at the Montana Inter
scholastic Track and Field meet and
reigned as queen of the three-day
festival. She is a member of Kappa
Alpha Theta Sorority.
_
1 ÎÎ. S ,"5 , p C ,T'i. Wa r '", , '" , S"
"f 52Ä * h L° r lÄ
executive approval at Washington,
1 and ** 1» expected that construction
! on th f ^11 get under way
! m a short time.
The project is one in which all of
i western Sanders county Is interested.
The estimated cost of $72,727.27 and
the proposal for construction is a
$40,000 loan and a grant of $32,727.27.
S Xia ,0 to Äf t 7 l foen£^"aSS
liJmonSnïï™ 1 the proJ_
^economical.
.w* 1 ® °* "Bdm ttie district Is
abo , ut J a f re !'
. ma r™ eventually
?? irrigable. There are now in cultiva
ti° n . onl y about l j!? 0 . acres, but resl
| dents of the district give assurance
600 acres additional will be
P" fc u 11061 ' cultivation Immediately upon
the assurance of water for the project,
The chief purpose of the project is
to hold back the runoff from Wantless
lake through the construction of a dam
at a natural dam site. The dam will
be seven miles up the canyon above
the canal headgate. The canal project
will be two miles long. Water harnessed
111 the lake will be released to flow
down the natural canyon to the head
fate of the canal, from where it will
be taken over the distribution system.
The section of the valley included to
the proposed irrigation district is land
of proved high productivity and water
can be had. It is said, upon a most
economical basis. Hie project is to a
section of Sanders county, where diver
siflcation has made wonderful strides.
Hie project is sponsored by the state
^f ate ™^ 1 T ati0 ^ b uf rd and , th c board
d^J^dnty commissioners of Sanders
county.
It is expected that construction work
on the project will get under way soon
after George Weisel, zone engineer for
the WPA at Missoula, is officially ad
vised of the approval of the project.
Bead the Classified Advertisements
'M
• 0 IT'S A «SOCK"
IN
#
fm
In HOLLAND. |p
gue«t« remove their Äfe
• hoe* outside the fiMj
liost s door. Friendly
Americans take off
their Kata to a whis
key that ia friendlier HE
to the taste . . .
SCHENIEVS ■
"RED LABEL". ■
#
Of
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/ * IT* Sehcnlcy's
FRIENDLY-TASTING WHISKEY
Schenley takes an extra measure to give
you extra pleasure... "melding" choicest
stocks under simultaneous HEAT,
PRESSURE and AGITATION. The result is
SCHENLEY'S"RED LABEL"... super-smooth
whiskey, that is fr ien dli er to your taste.
Try this friendlier-tasting whiskey today.
Al mHMor
O M S ji Tt tO
HHIl U li lt H
^jbeltÿlt^ul
PINT
*1.00
N0.2SOC
QUART
»1.90
No. 250E
H GALLON
»3.70
No. 2S0F
Soy
mam
Schenley
• Ariiir
The OMIT
wbiiiti S fiui *Ww 50 pfooi
TEACHERS PLAN
STUDY PROGRAM
RESEARCH WORK WILL BE CAR
RIED BY NUMEROUS COM
MITTEES APPOINTED
Reporta Will Be Made at Annual Meet
ing of Montana Society for Study of
Education to Be Held Next March;
M. E. A. Convention Speakers Named.
Inauguration of a long-term pro
gram of planning by the Montana
Society for the St
was disc
tudy of Education
nssed at a meeting of the
society's executive committee, held
in the offices of Martin P. Moe,
executive secretary of the Montana
Education association at Helena.
Zella K. Flores of Lewis town, presi
dent of the society and chairman of
the meeting, said research work will
be carried on by a number of commit
tees which are to be appointed by the
society. The committees will be di
vided Into fields of guidance and per
sonnel rural education, social and
civic objectives of education, study of
reorganization of co-operative curricu
lu ?L st ^ y ' .. .. „ .
Miss Flores said the committee mem
bers would be announced following
consultation with the appointees. The
carry on their work
ted! virtually throughout the state and
will report at the annual meeting of
the Montana Society for the Study of
Education, to be held next March.
The executive council members also
made final plans for the annual dis-,
trict conventions of the M. E. A., to be
held next fall and ln dismissing ap
polntments to various committees that
SfoTÈÆtem?' M E - A - " M0Dt *"
Members ot the M.E.A. .»cuMve
council are President Ross, Dr. W. R.
Ä o "wÂÎ
Philiœbinv E secoS vàœ' m^ident- 1
Ruth Reafdon^tate sur^rinêndènt of
public^ l^ructlra? Zella^ Flor^ of
Eewtetown oretident of the Mo^aim
Sv7or P ftrlta d v of EduS
Myrtle Nordwick of Wolf P^tat, Ray
Bjork of Glendive, L. O. Brockmann of
Lewistown, of and
R "• nreSdSte' dMrtct
speakers » be teatined on propams
of the five district conventions of the
Montana Education association next
fall were named Secretly Moe said
the speakers would be rotated so that
at each oi the flve
ai ^ct meetings,
??
™l?'Ä"knd B 1 ÄWeÄ"gS'-'
JSjSi?*' Ch0Sen by
the New York
Adam Bennion of Salt Lake
sonnel director of the Utah Power and
Light Co.; Dr. S. A. Hamrin, head
of the secondary education department
at Northwestern university, Evanston,
ni.; Dr. L. T. Hopkins, member of the
Columbia faculty and chairman of the
National Curriculum Study group,
Whiting Williams, vice president and
personnel director of a Cleveland, O..
steel mill and one of the best informed
men in the country today on the labor -
capital relationship problem; Dr. W. A.
Gregory, specialist to the part-time and
evening education department of the
federal office of education to Washing
ton, D. CH. Drane Lester, admlnls
trative assistant to J. Edgar Hoover,
director of the federal bureau of to
vestigation.
Dr* Hugh Woodard of Salt Lake City,
regional director of the WPA to the
department of education and recrea
^
J^akota in Grand Forks, Dr. Howard
E^ 50 . 1 ?'
^ ^ wÏshiSn D C anÂ
Davis, prominent Butte attorney.
Hie council voted to discontinue the
all-state band as fax as Its appearance
at the conventions go, but decided to
maintain the all-state chorus and or
chestra. The chorus will meet at Boze
man and the orchestra at Billings this
year.
Five standing and five special com
mit tees were created by the council.
personnel director of
stock exchange; Dr.
City, per
BIGGER ACREAGE
OF CORN IS URGED
HAS HIGH VALUE AS FEED CROP,
SAYS COLLEGE EXTENSION
AGRONOMIST
Ralph W. Mercer Says Varieties Adopt
ed to Montana Range From M to ISO
Day Kinds With Good Retarns from
Both Irrigated and Dry Land Farms.
Farmers in most Montana counties
would be justified this* year in in
creasing their acreage of corn because
of its high value as a feed crop, says
i D. Mercer, extension agronomist
ontana State college.
A string believer in com in Mon
tana's cropping system, Mercer pointa
out that this crop is adapted to a large
part of Montana and that varieties are
available which will mature under a
I wide range of conditions. And its value
as feed can hardly be underestimated,
he says, because even In drouth years
some com has come through to provide
valuable feed for stock.
f r0 rathe
as Minnesota 13, and Silver King pro
duced along the Yellowstone river, to
the 90 to 110 day varieties such as
Falconer, Pioneer, Wisconsin 25, Brown
County, Northwestern dents. Early Min
nesota 13 and the flints. These latter
are more suitable for favored areas In
northern and Central Montana where
the heat units are high during the
growing season
+ , „ _ _
„£?
™ de , r Irrigation a bushel of
S o2ÿ d A P la ~ÎL*r2^?â fc P„_® 1 igf îî
£3d X» ÎWi 1 à 1
Sft'fgÄ"' tattïï
Rai
M
Meroer also reminds farmers that
where «>m Is used In strip cropping
operations as a substitute for summer
faUow . It Is an Important factor in
controlling soil erosion. And where this
tyï ?f of farming Is adopted It fits In
016 agricultural conservation
pr08ram -
varieties to Montana range
120 to 130 day varieties such
in
average years to provide for the
normal growth of stalks and ears.
Retail merchants to the United
States do 67.8 percent of their business
for cash or on the COD basis, 21.3
percent on open account and 10.9 per
cent on the installment basis.
The regular committees are legislative,
school lands, Montana Society for the
Study of Education, credentials and
resolutions. The special committees are
on contracts and locals, teachers' re
tirement, tenure, radio and necrology.
MODERN WOMEN
H t« dM*9 d U« ■ »■ thly p«ia anddeUy do«W
(gkw.iMi î m<m fell •!•, •xpamraoramitju- amiit,
flMÜSvC
1
K*h*M*ud|
•lldruobti
*TtM MAWON» % MAM*
pappose
YOU TRY
' Old-Time Brand sot
Kentucky
Straight (timk
Bourbon fnS3
"hisk m
Yoe art Just bound
ft Hkt it.
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THIS WHISKEY IS 2| YEARS
Code Ne. 67 B. W PU.; 67 G, Pta.» 67 S,
OLD
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ST1TZEL *£tk£0 OiSTiiLEPV
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