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Montana oil and mining journal. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1931-1953, April 08, 1939, Image 8

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075103/1939-04-08/ed-1/seq-8/

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Saline Waters Necessary
To Form Crude In Shales
So extensive are the oil reserves
popularly believed by many that oil
neath the surface of the earth.
however, is governed by four general
of any one of them making the
First, there must be in the
gion a source rock containing the
necessary carbonaceous material
from which the petroleum could be
formed. The most common source
rocks are the bituminous shales
laid down by the sea. For some
reason Ih ' shales formed by sedi
mentation in fresh water did not
give rise to valuable accumulations
of oil. This knowledge is of basic
importance to the oil prospector,
for it savas him from drilling in
unfavorable rock formations.
But even if the rocks in the
region are favorable to oil forma
tion, there must be a reservoir
rock where the oil can accumulate.
Usually th» reservoir rock is sand
stone, which contains spaces be
tween the particles ranging from
10 to 40 per cent of its volume.
This porosity permits the oil to
flow through the rock, which holds
i-t like a sponge. Sometimes lime
stone and dolomite serve as reser
voir rocks.
The third requisite for an ac
cumulation of petroleum is a fav
orable structural arrangement of
the layers of rocks. Unless nature
folded the rocks with the proper
twists and pockets, the oil could
not be trapped,
form of geological oil trap is the
anticline, an arching of the rocks.
The simplest
At first it was believed that this
form of trap was the only type
in which oil could be accumulated,
hut now more than a dozen kinds
of rock traps are recognized.
The fourth condition for the ac
cumulation of oil in commercial
quantities is a cover of imjpervious
rock over the reservoir to keep the
vapors and volatile materials con
fined. Petroleum in the ground has
a temperature considerably higher
than the temperature of the air
at the earth's surface, and if the
p troleum was not tightly confined,
lhe lighter substances would distill
off.
NEWELL-CHANOLER
BUY MANNING AND
MARTIN EQUIPMENT
Newell-Chandler Drilling Co. has
been incorporated at Cut Bank by
M. M. Newell, Jr., president; J. E.
"Shorty" Chandler, vice president
and Paul A. Wolk, secretary-treas
urer. to do rotary contracting in
Montana. This firm has purchased
the interests of Manning & Mar
tin in Montana and has taken over
Recently they
brought in a new' National portable
rotary outfit, the last word in ro
tary. which will greatly speed the
drilling of Cut Bank wells, while
heavier equipment will be used In
Turner Valley w'here Newell and
■Chandler have a num'ber of con
tracts.
the
equipment.
SUNSHINE EXPANDING
Exnansion program is being un
dertaken by Sunshine Mining Co. of
Idaho, including option on major
ity stock of Silver Syndicate, Inc.,
and property in Nevada, according
to President R. M. Hardy, Yakima
Wish.. Silver Syndicate nronertv
adjoins Sunshine property in Idaho
and its acquisition will permit
greater freedom in prospecting
northern part of Sunshine hold
ings, Sunshine Exploration Ltd. has
been organized in Nevada and has
optioned Rio Grande Copper Co.
holdings at Mountain City. Nevada,
and is financing exploration work.
SAMPLING
"is the process of obtaining from a
lot of ore a smaller quantity that
contains, in unchanged percentages,
all the constituents of the original lot"
— Ü. S, BUREAU OF BONES.
This is one of our regular jobs.
P'xring the past 25 years, our Washoe
Sampler has sampled and purchased
for cash millions of tons of gold, silver
and copper ores and concentrates, at
the rate of 1,500 tons a day. . . .
ANACONDA
Copper Mining Company
Butte, Montana
,, r
in the United States that It is
ean be found nearly anywhere be
The successful drilling for oil,
geological conditions; the absence
venture unprofitable.
re-D
PEF-mcl
M#rch 29. 1939
Ir. O. I DeSchon
The Montana Oil and Mining Jour
nal
'îreat Falls, Montana.
Dear Orie—
I have just received the March
25 issue of the Journal, and note
liât this is the number one edition
•»f the nineteenth volume of the
Journal. I want to take this oppor
unity to extend ray best wishes for
he continued success of the Jour
>al and to express the hope that
t will continue to be as spicy, in
formative, and interesting In the
future as it has been in the past.
With kindest regards, I am
Very cordially yours,
DOWELL INCORPORATED
P. E. Fitzgerald,
Research Geologist
STEWART POOL IS
TO BE REVIVER BY
SPRING DRILLING
Some new development in the
old Stewart pool of west central
Kevin-Sunburst field Is in pros
nect this spring, with the starting
of two wells in section 30-35-2W.
One of these wells, in NE% SW%
Section 30 is being started by R.
E. Smith on the Van Note farm.
Pfabe & Enpieking are prepar
ing to drill another well on their
government permit, south of their
main production. The new well is
to be in NE % NE % Section 30.
In this pool is the famous Camp
>ell-St(>wart producer, one of the
best of the early day wells, now
known as the ■ Kesun-Stewart. Early
day wells on the Helmericks farm
in Section 30 had oil but were sub
sequently abandoned,
introduction of acidization. There
is an area of a mile or more that
has had no acidization although
located in the midst of producing
wells.

before the
FITZGERALD SPEAKS
ON ACIDIZATION AT
PITTSBURGH SESSION
P E, Fitzgerald, engineer of
Dowell, Inc., formerly of Shelby
was on» of the speakers on the
program of the spring meeting of
the American Petroleum Institute's
division of production, eastern dis
trict. in Pittsburgh, Pa., on Wed
nesday. His topic w'as "Improve
ments to Chemical Treatment of
Oil and Gas Wells." Another in
teresting topic on the program was
"A Critical Survey of the Geoche
mical Methods of Prospecting for
Oil and Gas" by Sylvain Plrson,
of the Pennsylvania State College.
TEND A CONTRIBUTION TO
THE SUNBURST BADGER
d
Purist
k
BK'î
ESTABLISlEp 19 »I
Propose Federal Funds To
Build Forest Roads To Minos
A bill of importance to the mining industry of Montana
has been introduced in the United States senate by Senator
l'>. K. Wheeler of Montana in the forrii of amendments to
the agricultural appropriations bill. Senator Wheeler pro
posed appropriating $1,500,000 for construction of roads
for development of mineralized areas within the national
forests and appropriating an additional $30,000 for forest
research work at the. Northern Rocky Mountain forest and
range experiment station at Missoula.

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Increasing the .Supply—
Give the petroleum refineT due
credit fof prolonging and expand
ing America's oil reserves. While
the geologists and the producers
are finding and producing more
and more crude underground, the
refiner gradually is improving re
fining processes to the extent that
less and less crude is being needed
to meet the growing demand for
refined products.
WHthin comparatively a few
years, for instance, the refiner has
doubled the quantity of motor
fuel obtained from « barrel of
crude oil. It is claimed for re-,
cently perfected refining methods
that this quantity shortly will be
increased by about 50 per cent!
In addition, the new refined pro
ducts are capable of yielding more
power and useful work. By thus
playing both ends against the mid
dle, the petroleum industry seems
to be making life difficult to those,
who cry scares of oil scarcity!
Sharing the Market—
Anybody who wants to find a
Right or Wrong?
Here is a little test for you
1. The current used to
transmit the voice by
telephone is the most
delicate current in com
mon use.
RIGHT □ WRONG □
7/
//
2. Wire in use in the
Bell System would go
around the world more
than 3000 times.
RIGHT □ WRONG □
l
The answers are shown below and here is the
answer for quick, satisfactory communication.
When you want to reach someone in another
town, for business or social purposes, telephone!
It not only takes your voice to the person you
want to reach but brings back an immediate
spoken reply.
The operator will be glad to tell you any
out-of-town-rates.
%
Si s
<U -D X -D
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— <5 *Jr
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3 £
v.
V* P
1 = «-
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c 'a
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£ 41 Ô)
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- £ £ 8 a
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8
The Mountain States Telephone & Telegraph Co.
market In which sales are widely
distributed should take a look
the gasoline business.
Researchers, looking through
Unir statistical microscope recent
ly, discovered that in 1937 tax
paid gasoline consumption totalled
21,000,000,000 gallons. The big
gest company in the business en
joyed 8.2 per cent of the market!
The 10 biggest marketers, aver
aged about 5.7 per cent each!
Conservation—
The petroleum industry conserv
ées its resources by making them
work over time. Natural gas, which
•provides pressure for raising crude
oil from the well without pumping,^
is used many times by a process
of recycling. The gas is captured
each time it comes to the surface
and is forced back to draw addi
tional crude oil to the surface. In
t ionie recent wells the gas pressure
s maintained automatically at the
'most efficient level by a system of
underground valves.
WANT SOMEONE
WHO CAN MAKE
GOOD MINE PAY
The Journal was this week call
ed upon by 4he owners nf a mine
near Jardine
w'hich is completely
equipped, has good ore and lacks
only managenjent and working cap
ital. Its owkiers, are not mining
men, wish to turn over controlling
Interest to a competent mine
ator who is financed to
the operation.
oper
carry on
The mine has 800 feet of tunnel
and drifts which have blocked out
about 20.000 tons of ore which
says $11.70 per ton.
other 30.000 tons In sight,
mine is fully equipped with a 320
Ingersoll-Rand
two jack hammers.
I
!
i
i
as
There Is an
The
foot
compressor. :
1200 feet of|
rails, complete d^ill steel and shop
equipment.
,, . ,
** the ®. nd the du mp is a 75-:
ton ore bin feeding directly into
the mill. The mill has an 8x9 jaw !
crusher and a 25-ton Gibson rod !
null, with amalgamator and table. 1
The mill has never operated effi
ciently,
recovery. After spending ail their
money trying to make the proper
ty pay, the principal owners have
decided to call In someone who can
recover the gold from this
per
_. ore.
The Journal will be glad to put
inquirers in touch with the prin
cipals.
NEW
MINING FIRMS
HBLBA—Articles of incorpora
tion have been filed iby the West
ern Gold Mines of Anaconda to
ry on a general milling business
Directors are R. E. Thomas J R
Johnson and C. iM. Smith of Ana
conda. Capital stock is $50,000.
Articles of incorporation were al
so filed by the Southern Cross Min
ing & Milling Co. to
car
carry on a
general mining and milling busi
ness. Directors are R. E. Thomas
J. R. Johnson and Ray E. Tower
of Anaconda. Capital stock is listed
at $50,000.
SEND A CONTRIBUTION TO
THE SUNBURST BADGER
MINES BROKERAGE
COMPANY
P. O. Box 775
Helena, Montana
GOLD PROPERTIES FOR SALE.
Syndicate Management
■'!!■$ ! I|
iiuWM MjBnHrini
mm

Western Iron Works
m

(Incorporated)
1400 East Second Street
Phone 2-3966

1 BUTTE,
MONTANA i
H
»
=
We Carry Stocks of
STEEL AND CAST IRON GRINDING BALLS
Sise 2-inch by 4-inch

I
H
I
AMERICAN STEEL SPLIT PULLEYS
COLD ROLLED SHAFTING

i
1
SHEET STEEL
»
»
STRUCTURAL STEEL SHAPES
OPPORTUNITIES
Herein are listed some of tbe bent bargain« to be found
today in Montana's Oil Fields and Mining Districts. In *>»«■
column are found the items that escape the casual reader—
Rates: 25c per line—6 Average Words to Line.
Enclose cash with order, to insure publication in next issue.
OIL
Tbe Baldwin Talent Test give* th*
Answer. A simple, scientific musical ap
Htnde test for children developed by
Clncinnartl Conservatory of Music,
IS MY CHILD MUSICAL?
Write
Orest Falla Recording Studios
for vonr copy. Great Fall*. Montana
8-21-tf
■'WFK7GKA88 ARCH BAT—Contour,
topography, all well locations Fine#
map of Ita kind ever prepared
* B Km rick, Supply Dcpartmea«
Montent Oil and Mining Journal
MINING
WANTED to buy a S-ton pilot mill.
J*. O. Hoi 74«, Great Falls. Montana
4-8-a
MISCELLANEOUS
CAPITAL 8KBKER8—Pot your project
Cost trifling
AM8TER # LEONARD,
before 280 Key-men.
Detail« free.
OorJb| Quotations
on tbe
STANDARD STOCK EXCHANGE
SPOKANE
GIBSON ASSOCIATES, INC.
Great Fails, Montana
Closing April 7, 1939
Clayton Silver.
Dayrock ..
Golconda .
Hecla Mining.
Grandview ..
Independence .
Jack Waite.
Metaline .
North Butte.
Mont. Consolidated.
Sherman Lead.
Standard Silver Lead
Tamarack .
Bunker Hill.
-21 24%
49
60
.—4 5%
7.50 8.25
.6 6%
3%
4%
„...22 % 25
.32 % 35
.38 42
6
7
.22 27
.15 20
.24% 27
12.60 13.50
CURBS
Callahan- .
Pend Oriele..
Premier Gold
Sidney .
1.00 1.50
1.50 1.55
1.95 2.10
■ 2 % 3 %
OVER THE COUNTER
Wash Water Power.. 99 00
Mont Power Pfd
100.00
99.00 101.00
METALS
Lead, New York
Zinc, New York..
Copper, Foreign.
Copper, Domestic.
. .0485
.0489
.1019
10.75 11%
REDEMPTION OP TAX TITLES
HELENA.
_ , April 5 — Attorney
General H. J, Freebourn ruled to
° a y the owner of property sold for
taxes may redeem it by paying the
original tax without
terest if the tax deed
were started before
SB 12 of the 1939
penalty and In
proceedings
approval of
legislature.
He also ruled that where
the
were started and tax
deed taken subsequent 'to enact
ment of the law, the owner
likewise repurchase the
paying the original
penalty and interest
may
land by
tax, without
POWER CO, DIVIDEND
BUTTE
Announcement was
made by the Montana Power Co
that the regular quarterly divi
dend of $1.50 a share on its out
standing preferred stock. |6 series,
has been declared, payable May 1
1939. to stockholders of '
at tbe close of business
11, 1939.
record
on April
J. J. BKC.WKB
R. E. PEBET
BRUNNER & PEREY
ASSAYING, ORE TESTING.
CONSULTING
II BROADWAY
P. O. Box 7*«
Phone 2718-W
HKLENA,
MONTANA
fireproof
Leggat Hotel
BUTTE. MONTANA
Alex Leggat, Prop.
Ratos, fl.50 up
MINING ENGINEERS
GEOLOGISTS
MIXING MEN WELCOME
Pox Theatre Building. Detroit
gan.
Mlchl
9-24-tf
8WKKTORA8S ASCB MAP
Mimeographed copy showing O 8 Q
contour*. Township* ia to 8TN
Range« TW to 9E 50c. Supply Denart
meut Montana Oil Journal b.m
th*
S.
" d ÄüN°Ä' *
'«•°Ä. Roi "m^Gre«
Geological
eograpbed— ma p*
Montana OU i
Fall*
report*
s copied
reproduced. Box S 00
Mining Journal. Great
or
B'_
»PERATOB8 and geologists may avail
Sr-'r Jf. . the V e of th. MoDUn.
Oil and Mining Journal'»
library, which has the Urg mtSSu?
tton extant of D. 8 O.
privat« reporta on Montana oil
mining geology. Since many of thee«
'Äh ° the ' Su^^HEnt Ch ï 0 ^
tan. Oll M d ÂnlngJmSÏL Fi*
SSSS S3 1 Äff
Kon Uns
«n<5
vi
-V*L N 8ITEK--At Lower 81 Marv's
ta. ms •» -ss- Arg
4-8-d

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