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Montana oil and mining journal. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1931-1953, November 04, 1939, Image 8

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Doodlebug Development
Boon To Placer] Mining
(Continued from last week}
To give a general description of
different types of small
would be impossible here.
shows
the many
plants
The
what the average
in construction and operation.
The average doodlebug is adap
ted to fairly shallow ground vary
ing from 6 to 20 feet in depth with
soft bedrock or hard-pan. Wheth
the dredge is of the floating
dry-land tvpe. the operation is
somewhat the same. The excavator,
generally mounted on caterpiller
treads, transverses the bank in
of the washer and delivers
excavated material to the hop
time in spotting the
following description
doodlebug is like
a
■ r
or
front
the
To save
per.
bucket over the hopper the hopper
should be of generous size at least
12 feet. This In
that the hopper bottom
10 feet, or better.
turn means
will not have enough slope for the
material to slide readily down to
Many of the floating
the screen. i
dredges depend upon the rocking
bottom of the dredge caused by
the depositing of the material in
the hopper to slide the material
Many forms of
to
into the screens,
mechanical feeders have been de
veloped I>y operators, but in the
long run they return to the gen
eral type of hopper. The usual ten
dency is to keep several streams of
water shooting with fair force into
the hopper and washing the mater
ial into the screen. Some opera
tors have kept an attendant on
the hopper with a large hose to
wash the material Into the screen.
The hoppers should be of fairly
construction, well supported
heavy
and reinforced to stand the con
tinual shock from the dropping of
tons of gravel into the hopper.
A revolving screen four or five
in diameter and at least 16
feet in length of actual screening
surface and preferably perforated
with 3-8 to 7-16 inch round holes
will be required for a capacity of
2,000 to 2,600 cubic yards per day
of the average placer ground. In
placer dredging the operator should
be thoroughly acquainted with the
ground which he is working. The
percentage of fines in the ground
should be known so that the type
feet
and size of the screen be estimated
fairly well. Direct gears and c ^ alI
drive on revolving screens are not
too successful and should he avoui
The best type of screen now be
ing used has heavy tread rings of
cast steel near each end, supported!
two pairs of heavy, large dia
meter cast steel rollers. The P air
f rollers at the lower end of the
screen are powered by bevel gear
ing, which transmits the power to
the drillers on the screen. The grade
on the screen varies from 1 "i
2VJ inches per foot. The steep grade
of 2% inches per foot may be used
material that js free and
and does not require much wash
ing to put the fines through he
od.
•Ml
' ■
r
screen.
An eight-inch centrifugal pump
aî a^ed^which'tilTgiv"' eo'to'?!
feet of lift will furnish water for
n 2 000 to 2.500 cubic yard plant.
lu cknniH iisn he fur-!
T - h t « dr m, „ twn nr three-inch
mshed ' . dean un fire
protect foil and cleanings of the
protect . d d _ float-'
decks. Wh n bano mirnn of some;
nK a >/ m ic vent for hull drain
type should be kept for hull drain
age.
plant with a four-foot
diameter screen, a 24-inch belt con
running at about 300 feet
minute, mounted on a light
but substantial steel truss frame
work, Is sufficient for the stacking
of the tailings. During the past 30
years of dredging rubber belts have
been developed which are really
excellent for the removal of tail
service.
For a
veyor
per
They seem very high priced to
those new in the business of dredg
ing, but those with experience in
this field are glad to pay the price
and get the goods and service.
The proper screening
gravel is the first very important
requisite for the proper saving of
the values contained. Since it takes
more water to wash the gravel in
the screen than it would over the
gold saving tables many prefer to
add all necessary water for washing
through the nozzles which wash the
gravel In the screen. Feeders with
adjustable valves should be provid
ed so that additional water may be
of the
,, , . .. __,
f dded J 0 ' th ® ga Jn 1t < r ^ a I, K la ol
the tables when required. It is al
so very essential that the pulp be
uniformly distributed over the
This distribution of the
tables.
pulp over the tables has often been
the difference between the success
and the failure of an operation,
Many of the riffles used in the
smaller dredges are direct copies
LIQUIDATION SALE
Milling Equipment, Motors,
All Sizes, Equipment, Etc.
OF THE
TIMBER BUTTE MILL
WRITE
WIRE PHONE
DÜL1EN STEEL PRODUCTS,
Inc.
Telephone 6157
P, O. BOX 1945
BUTTE, MONTANA
o
of the standard type of placer
dredge. The type of distribution
which seems most successful was
patented in 1905 on a dredge at
Orville. California.
With this system the fines,
after pagsiug the screen, are caught
in a steel collecting pan under the
screen. The collecting pan slopes
toward the head of the sluices with
a slope of 1 % inches to the foot.
The pulp passes
sluice over the riffles and at the
lower end is subdivided into equal
portions, which pass through laun
ders to the head of the secondary
tables in which it is spread out ov
three times the width
which it passed in the prim
through this
er twice or
over
ary sluice. This spreading out ef
facts a secondary concentration. The
secondary tables slope toward the
stern of the washer enabling ready
tailing disposal. This system of con
centration has been successful in
over 100 dredges, and many plants
which were unsuccessful with oth
er types of riffles were remodeled
nd made successful and profitable
with this system.
The great advantage of this prac
tice Is that unless the operator is
in exceptionally high ground, it
will not be necessary to clean up
more than once a month Instead of
every week.
There is a great variety of rif
in use on dredges, but the
fies
standard seems to be a riffle made
of one-inch angle Irons or the wood
riffles with steel or rubber face.
The angle Iron riffles are more
sturdy and wear longer than eith
of the other types, though there
ihe market new all
ÄrK Jf'îî. ÄV*
* •• —■ "»■»• *—
longer.
Somp nf tllP newer drv-land ma
ph , pp<J likp the j ll( |son-Paclfic are
pq , lipppd with the bowl type gold
savj devices or jigs. The use of
,j bowls and centrifugal amal
eamator8 are better adapted to the
dry . ]and r i KS than the floating be
cau8e of the stability of the outfit,
dredge
er
now on
The bobbing a
from thp dPposition of the material
Jjj n hopper Interferes with the
| opera tion of the bowls and jigs by
i the shifting of the vertical axis.
Jigs also depend upon stable foun
; da tj 0 ns so that water levels may
| | )e properly maintained.
Th e floating type, for successful,!
i operation, should have a fairly soft
j bedrock that may be scraped clean!!
w jth the bucket or much of the
va j ues will be left behind. The
standard type of the dredge has the
advantage of the buckets following
loosely and being moved over the j
bedrock much more evenly, thus
c j ean j n g m ore thorougly
i>ossible with a dragline bucket,
Tke dr y.j an d type of washer en
a))]es tPe bedrock to be studied and
carefully cleaned by hand, which
seldom necessary.
than is
j {s
In this article. I have tried to
Present the development and the
Process of naming the new indus
try rf manufacturing and operat
ing small two-unit gold dredges, j
Though the industry Is still in the j
, development stage and no satisfac-I
I°ry conclusion has been reached
in Us naming, it is thriving and is
! being successful. It is understood
washer8 do not hold to
the description given, but all follow
the same principle and the field is
rapidly standardizing.
EXPLOSION KILLS
ATLANTIC MINER
His partner, Charles Livermore,
suffered cuts, bruises, and serious
eye injuries and is hospitalized in
Three Forks.
Gray's hack was broken and his
body riddled with rocks. He died
j 800n a fter the accident in a Town
| pend hospital,
1
TOWNSEND—In the third ma
jor mine accident in Broadwater
county in two weeks Penn Gray
was fatally injured In explosion In
the Atlantic mine near Hassel Oct.
28.
Gray, Livermore, and Pat Car
I ter had been operating the mine
' for almost two years with average
I
1
Gray was a native of Libby but
had resided at Stevensville until
j about two years ago.
j On Oct. 16 John Larson lost his
life in a pre-mature blast and two
(days later Cleve Murphy was in
ijured seriously by an explosion.
-J
M
v
d*
ln>W
PUBVS H
ESTA BUS iOD 19 >|
Modern Mining Student
Can Take It Tough
Did somebody say that the new generation of mining engi
neers can't take it?
With Montana School of Mines grldders looking like cham
pions in the Small College Conference, Colorado Schol of Mines
at the top of the heap in the Rocky Mountain conference, New
Mexico Mines leaving a trail of desi ruction on the lower border,
and Texas College Mines playing giant killer in the southwest,
flic mining college football teams are becoming squads to be
feared and respected by other colleges.
Tough men playing a tough game for schools that demand
academic proficiency should insure a plentiful supply of brainy,
two-fisted mining engineers for several years to come.
NEW MILL AT
STAR MINE IS
OPERATING
The new 50-ton mill at the Star
mine at Neihart, built by Mrs.
George Reeves of Conrad, is now in
operation, making an excellent re
covery, according to Mrs Reeves
^roS? to SimU" Mrs. Reeves
sr*"i , .,TW*:K , Ä , Ä
cent years driven the tunnel 1,000
feet, to a total of 2,000 feet, where
a surprising vein of gold-bearing
ore was encountered,
district that has heretofore pro
duced only silver.
The concentrates from the new
This is a
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This is a snapshot of the new mill
at the Star mine at Neihart which
is no»' in successful operation,
working on newly discovered
high grade ore.
ore during the first week of opera
tion showed an average of 2.325
ounces of gold, 139.05 ounces of
silver, 4 3 per cent lead and 14 per
cent zinc. The 50-ton mill is a
Union Iron works plant with jaw
crusher. Union ball mill, classifier
and six flotation cells,
built by Louis B.
superintendent,
of Dupuyer.
erated for some time on ore now
on the dump which is being trans
ported to the mill by dragline.
Meantime a crew of men Is start
ing to develop a vein at 1400 feet
which has run from four to 14
feet wide for a distance of 100 feet
and in a 40-foot raise. It is good
mill feed that will keep the mill
working until the new ore at 2,000
feet can be developed.
The London mine, above the Star
is held by Mrs. Reeves under lease
and bond and will be developed In
the near future. The London dump
is said to contain good mill feed,
It was
Bunny" Stark,
with Harry Ellis
The mill will be op
'Ml
• '«"M'l
HD
( I
liilil
Western Iron Works

1
1400 East Second Street--Phone 2-3966
I BUTTE,
MONTANA
;
We Carry Stocks of
STEEL AND CAST IRON GRINDING BALLS
Sise 2-inch by 4-inch
AMERICAN STEEL SPLIT PULLEYS
COLD ROLLED SHAFTING
«
SHEET STEEL
i
STRUCTURAL STEEL SHAPES
Fairvlew Gold Mines, Inc., of
Helena is now reorganizing with a
view to building a mill and increas
ing the development work on Its
mine at Sheridan, Mont., where
sensational shipping ore has been
mined in the past. L. E. Place of
Great Falls has been chosen trustee
of the reorganization group,
capital will be Increased from
$50.000 to $75,000 with 5-cent par
value stock, of which 500,000 shares
will be issued at the outset to take
over the mines and equipment and
to pay outstanding obligations of
Fairview. The other 1,000,000
shares will be placed in the treas
ury or sold for development work
FAIRVIEW
MINE COMPANY
REORGANIZING
The
and the purchase of a mill.
Fairview stockholders are expect
ed to receive the new stock in ex
change for the old.
While the mine was being oper
ated under lease by Byron Felton
it netted a profit of $4,300 for
Fairview but with the accidental
death of Felton the owners decided
to refinance.
The Fairview mine showed a gross
profit of $10,000 in 1938. About
$40,000 has been spent in develop
ment work and the mine has ship
ped $60,000 worth of high grade
In the development of this
high grade a considerable amount
of milling ore has been mined and
blocked out which will provide
adequate mill feed to justify the
mill. Place plans do have the new
mill in operation by May 1.
The
ore.
also. Twelve men are employed
at the Star mine and mill at the
present time.
The start of the mine was re
cently celebrated by all members of
the crew and their families at a
There
dinner held at Dupuyer.
were 36 present.
H. I. PKBBT
9. J. BMJNVEB
BRUNNER & PEREY
ASSAYING, ORB TESTING,
CONSULTING
U BROADWAY
HELENA,
MONTANA
P. O. Box 164
Phone PU-W
HENRY R. LANCASTER
MINING ENGINEER
U. 8. MINERAL SURVEY
10 Pittsburgh Block
MONTANA
HELENA,
W. B. FINLAY,. CP.A.
GENERAL, MINING
AND
OIL FIELD ACCOUNTING
AUDITS, SYSTEMS
TAX SERVICE
First National Bank Bldg.
MONTANA
GREAT FALLE,
j
I
j
I
COPPER
OUTLETS
DISCUSSED
ANACONDA—Many new uses
for copper were described in an
interesting address illustrated with
100 samples before the Anaconda
Rotary club last Monday by P. E.
G. Spilsbury of Los Angeles, west
ern representative and development
engineer of the American Brass
company and consulting engineer
for the Anaconda Wire and Cable
company. Mr. Spilbury entertain
ed his listeners with a description
of recent developments In the new
uses for copper In the U. S. Navy,
automobile Industry, airplane en
gineering, air conditioning and
many other fields.
He stated that the American
Brass company now has 25,000 dif
ferent Items which are manufac
tured with copper as an important
part of their composition. Among
the alloys, in which copper is con
tained, he mentioned super-nickle,
everdur, beryllium, everdur-steel,
aluminum-bronze and others.
"Anaconda Copper Mining com
pany has been outstanding in pro
, vlding outlets for copper." Mr. Splls
'bury declared. He told of the action
of the U. S. Navy in replacing
stainless steel with super-nickel
pipes, condenser tubes and con
denser head plates for destroyers.
, "Consequently more copper is being
sold to the Navy than ever before
in history," he said.
"American Brass company devel
oped everdur as the greatest selling
non-ferrous alloy in the country,"
Mr. Spilsbury declared in demon
strating samples of the product. He
said that the alloy has the strength
of steel and the resistance power of
copper. Uses he mentioned were
for hot water heating tanks, ducts,
screws, bolts, nuts and heavier fas
tenings, tie rods, bulkheads,. I
beams, electrical conduits and In
architectural re-lnforcing.
Mr, Spilsbury exhibited beryllium
copper tools which he said made no
spark and were valuable in work
shops in which dangerous gases
might be present and there was
danger of explosion from the spark
caused by friction of tools.
Mr. Spilsbury showed pipe samples
varying from three one-thousandths
of an inch to five-inches In diameter
He told of their uses in airplane en- j
gies, flexible tubes for oil and gas
and air conditioning pumps.
Praises Frederick Laist.
He praised Frederick Laist, for- 1
mer general superintendent of the 1
Anaconda Reduction works, for his |
development of the electro-sheet
copper which he said is not confin
ed to Christmas cards and station
ery but is widely used for reinforc
ing concrete foundations to replace
felt and asphalt which has detertor
ated and has needed replacement.
MINES BROKERAGE
COMPANY
P. O. Box 775
Helena, Montana
GOLD PROPERTIES FOR SALE.
Syndicate Management
4
SAMPLING
f
*
"is the process of obtaining from a
lot of ore a smaller quantity that
contains, in unchanged percentages,
all the constituents of the original lot"
—U. 8. BUREAU OF MUTES.
This is one of our regular jobs.
During the past 26 years, our Washoe
Sampler has sampled and purchased
for cash millions of tons of gold, silver
and copper ores and concentrates, at
the rate of 1,600 tons a day. . . .
f
ANACONDA
Copper Mining Company
Butte, Montana
Closing Quotation*
on the
STANDARD STOCK EXCHANGE
SPOKANE
By
GIBSON ASSOCIATES, INC.
Great Falls, Montana
Noon Closing November 8, 1089
Clayton Silver.•|||
Dayrock .-.
Golconda ..
Hecla Mining.
Grandview .-.
Jack Waite.
Metaline .
North Butte..
Mont. Consolidated.—
Sherman Lead.—
Standard Silver Lead
Tamarack —.
Bunker Hill.
_26 30
_61 66
.4% 7
....7.00 7.60
- 10 % 11 %
35
_28
._„j6G 66
.62 66
.-3% 6
..30 34
.14 20
.34 38%
14.90 15.60
CURBS
2.30
1.0
Callahan .
Pend Oriele.
Premier Gold—.
Sidney .
.2.22 2.40
.1.16 1.2^
.3% 6%
OVER THE COUNTER
Wash. Water Power 104.50 106.60
Mont. Power, Pfd.—103.00
104.00
METALS
.0660
.0650
. 12 %
Lead, New York.
Zinc, New York
Copper, Domestic.
NEW POWER
UNITS FOR
LIBBY MIRE
An announcement Is made by
the Glacier Silver Lead Mining
company of its purchase of twin
semi-Diesel engines of 220 horse
power each and two 440-volt gen
erators with exciters, switchboard
and transformers, to supplement
its hydroelectric power plant at
the mine and mill, eigbt miles
south of Libby, Mont.
Concrete foundations for the sup
port of this 40-ton Diesel plant
are under construction, P. W.
Kiesling, secretary-treasurer, Spo
kane, reports in behalf of the
board of directors. When the foun
dations have been completed and
cured, the new equipment will be
hauled to the mine, Installed and
made ready for use.
With this additional power, the
will have suf
Glacier Silver
ficient power to operate the mill
throughout the year.
The current assessment of half a
cent a share will become delin
quent November 15.
GOLDEN LEAF OPERATING
BANNACK—The Golden Messen
ger Corp. of Heleha la operating
the Golden Leaf mill and mine here
with Gunnar Johnson in charge.
HAVE YOU A
Mine for Sale?
NO BROKERAGE
Write for Details to Property
Department
Metals & Minerals Research
Bureau
9 Sutter St. San Francisco
or your
Local Chamber of Commerce
FIREPROOF
Lcggat Hotel
BUTTE, MONTANA
Alex Leggat, Prop,
Rates, 91.50 up
MINING ENGINEERS
GEOLOGISTS
mining MEN WELCOME

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