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Montana oil and mining journal. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1931-1953, January 06, 1940, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075103/1940-01-06/ed-1/seq-2/

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AUTHOR UNCOVERS
BOZEMAN'S ERROR
,
"L A D Y" BLACKMORE NEITHER
CLAIMED NOR RATED
TITLE
Claire Sheridan Reveals That Bronze
Plaque on Mrs. Blaekniore's Tomb
stone Was Placed There Erroneously
by Over-Impressed Pioneers.
Bv WALTER E. TAYLOR
Over one of the graves In Sunset
Hills cemetery in Bozeman, one of
the oldest white burial grounds in
Montana, there is a neat, pyramid
shaped marker bearing a bronze
plaque and the legend, "Lady Mary
Blackmore, Wife of Lord William
Blackmore." In the stone Itself is
Mary Black
carved the name.
The bronze plaque was
placed on the monument many
years ago by civic authorities of
Bozeman, blit the bronze plaque
more.
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8UFPLT DKFABTMXNT
Montana Oil and
Mining Journal
Great FaAs
Concert" Star
... . .
From popular blues songstress to
concert.star Ls a long leap—but lovely
Nan Wynn seems to have made It
without trouble. However, the "con
cert" is Raymond Scott's CBS "Con
cert in Rhythm." where Nan gels a
chance to display some ol her unique
tonalisms with superb orchestral back
ing. In the last two years the West
Virginia lass has risen to stardom on
the airlanes. Her current program is
heard Tuesdays at 10 p. m., E. S. T.,
. - --- ■ -.—— ■
"lord" and "lady."
William Blackmore and his beautiful
bride arrived In Bozeman in the spring
of 1872. They were among the first
tourists who came to Montana espe
pjqiiy ï« cop fVtp wonders of Yellow
stone national imrk ^ev came with
™ Z oCthSZ trän
fn me riav^ When the were
m the days when the Indians were

,V
i
-
z
M
»
m
«
s
i
does not tell the truth; investiga
tion reveals that Mary Blackmore
was not a titled lady and her hus
band was not a British
error is not in any way due to
deceit on the part of the Black
mores for they did not attempt to
pass themselves off as anything
but exactly what they were, a
young couple of good English fam
lord. This
ily out to see the world. It was
the good people of the pioneer vil
lage of Bozeman who bestowed up
on the Blackmores the titles of
i still taking pot-shots at whites who
made themselves good targets. They
made an incongruous picture as they
rode into the falre-fronted main street
of Bozeman, with their pües of fancy
baggage all about them.
Were Dashing Pair
The Blackmores were a dashing
couple and although they were not
actually titled people they were mem
, bers of English "county" families, the
landed gentry. They referred casually
j al Jd honestly to the great of Europe
who were their close friends. Mary
j BJ acl ™? re to jd of attending Queen
Victoria's royal court. T7ie ladles of the
budding frontier society of Montana
"took the Blackmores up" with a ven
ifriÄ SSe'CS;
entertained by the mining kings While
their expedition into Yellowstone park
j was being prepared, they became pop
i ular with Bozeman people and hunt
ing parties in the district were organ
ized in their honor. No one knows who
'first started to call them "lord" and
"lady," but their names appeared with
titles in Helena papers of the period.
While the Blackmores were still in i
Bozeman, Mrs. Blackmore became ill
and the Willsons, a pioneer family,
took her into their home. There she
died of the fever in the summer of
1872 before the expedition to the park
got under way,
When thev had started their travels
ment B thaV?f e1ther died^nroede tmrlal
would ^teke olare where death occunred*
îo"Hv e SS5S
Journey. Keeping this pact, William ,
._ _ . . i :
shown his i
during her Illness, he purchased five
acres «I land containing the town
graveyard and presented it to the |
people of Bozeman. Over Mary Black- i
more s grave he placed the unusual
Pyramid tombstone.
William Blackmore continued his |
journey into Yellowstone park and j
then returned to England where he |
published several articles about Mon- |
tana. A peak near the park is named |
Englishman and his i
j
While he was in Montana, Black- j
more signed his name always as plain j
Blackmore buried his wife to Bozeman
and to appreciation for the kindness
in honor of the
wife.
! "William Blackmore," and to the jour
I nais of the Doane expedition to the
! park he Is mentioned without any title,
i But to the minds of the people of
i Bozeman he was always, and probably
; always will be, known as Lord Black
more. A few years after his departure
the city fathers of Bozeman, to appre
elation of Blackmore's gift to the city,
placed the bronze plaque on the
Blackmore tombstone.
Several years ago Claire Sheridan,
the internationally famous English
sculptress, came to Montana for the
I purpose of doing busts of Blackfeet
I Indian types and writing a book about
Blackfeet tribe. Mrs. Sheridan.
I herself a member of a noble British
1 family and a first cousin of the duke
i of Marlborough and of Winston
I Churchill, visited Bozeman and was
Î interested to the story of the Black
i mores. However, she said that as far
i as she knew there were no Blackmores
in the British peerage. Mrs. Sheridan,
whose Indian statues, by the way. were
' very good but whose book, "Red In
i terlude," leaves the reader with the
i impression that she barely escaped the
i Blackfeet with her scalp, knew her
; British peerage. She said there were
I noble Blackwoods but no noble Black
! mores. And she was correct, for
"Burke's Peerage" for the year 1872
lists no "Lord" or "Lady" Blackmore
because there were no such
i The Blackmores, despite the taforma
j tlon given on the bronze plaque to the
! Bozeman cemetery, had no title.
! This case of the misplaced title Is
i not unusual for western history records
j other cases where English visitors to
the early west were given titles by the
i pioneers. Owen Wis ter used such a
I situation as the plot of one of his
! short stories. A commoner Scotchman
who hunted the Green river country
I of Wyoming to the 1830s was known as
I "The Duke" to Kit Carson and other
1 fur hunters of the period although he
! had no claim to any title. In the <*pto
I ion of the fur hunters anyone who
1 had an English accent and enough
! money to come all the way to the
I Rocky mountains to hunt buffalo must
have been of noble birth
1 Lady" Mary Blackmore 'r 1b not the
i the
e.
THRILLS, TRAGEDY
IN ROLLER RINK
By D. J. O'MALLEY (N—V KID)
Amonp the almost foronttpn
Among ine almost forgotten
tragedies that occurred in Miles
City during the '80's, was the kill
ing °f Al Smith the roller sk., er,
by his brother, r rank Smith. Dur
ing the '80's the United States was
in the throes of the roller skating
craze, and Miles City, though but
a small frontier town, was bitten
pretty hard by the roller skating
bug. In 1884, Perkins Russell, a
sheepman. buUt a skating rink in MUes
The skating surface measured
50 by 150 feet and there was a stage
of ample size and fitted with the
scenery of a first class theater.
Miles City was a good show town
and many of the troupes held the
stage for a week at a time and showed
to good houses each night. Among
most prominent showing there as
membered by the writer, were George
C Mlin Shakespearian plays; Katie
Putnam, and Milton and Öpllle Nobles,
dramatic artists. R, G. (Bob) Ingersoll
known as "The Infidel," lectured on
The Mistakes of Moses." John Me
Guire, afterwards a noted theatrical
manager at Butte, appeared In mono
logues ana many others occupied the
stage at different times.
,, n ; v political speakers spoke to
the voters from the stage at the rink,
The writer remembers listening to such
notaWe politica! speakers as Wilbur
^,Jf Col w S ?f ld w S '^T h0 , ma ^. H - (Ton ri
garter. Martin McGmnis, W. A. Clark,
E. D. Matts (Gray Eagle of the
Rockies), and others, lambast each
other and their opposing candidates at
me rime
It was front this stage that Colonel
Sanders and Tom Carter made use of
SS«»? i 0r Ä h ^ ve . S°ne on in the
political history of Montana. Carter
Virtues of "a
£" t tu65 ° t L a nt
tana like a diarnnnrl nnTrfirtr^Wrt
f^nt" 3m ° nd ° n a dirty 5hirt
/>, i' i 0 , . .
Colonel Sanders m one of his tirades.
Yff 1 ^ st lhe democratic party, said
th ! 1re: Remember, my friends. I do
no t say that every democrat Is a horse
EARLY DAY AMUSEMENT HALL IN
MILES CITY SCENE OF EX
CITING INCIDENTS
High Point of Passing Drama Came
When Easterner Unable to Weather
the Liquor of Cattle Country Me
tropolis Killed His Brother.
Ma
thief but I do sav and in all truth
fulness, that I never knew or saw a
horse thief who wasn't a ' democrat "
Many roller skating attracttoSTîrere
put on at the rink. Artists came from
all over the United States to Miles
City. Trick and fancy skaters, male
and female, singly, in pairs, and as
many as four in one combination gave
exhibitions of their prowess on the
"foot wagons," as roller skates were
called ^ , th | A roUer skating
a ^ d '\ h ° P
were among tne varied attractions of
^hwh^k to^kt^hta
crutch fitted with wheels to assist him
m ms ^rations. Hflnrln „
O™ atesataml aw rek and whence
»» Ä h£ o*" T mi,»
City's eligible young ladles In an elope
meni.
Miles City boasted two speedy skat
ers. Ed Goettlich and Dominick White,
They skated a number of races against
outsiders and lost yery^few. Goettlich
defeated the North Dakota 10-mile.
cb .%mp lon , fwhose name cannot be re
called). ; White ran away from the
Butte five-mile man (whose name was
Walker) defeating him by one-eighth
of ? pile In a five-mile race. local
contests were staged and for a long
fi me Russel s roller rink was the busiest
SS? se 1 _ ln , M £ w !5l
n ?L ^ use the rink floor was filled
w ?^ skaters 6very day ' 511(1 1111111 mld -
ni « ht -
111 the early P 0 ^ 1 of September. 1885,
two dresseö men got off the N. P.
warc j yj e MacQueen) registered as Al
Smith and Prank Smith from Chicago,
They made Inquiries regarding the lo
cation of the skating rink and shortly
afterward both went up town.
The men met with the owner of the
j-j^ an^ made such arrangements as
were necessary and soon the town was
flooded with hand bills announcing
that the celebrated Smith Brothers,
premier trick and fancy roller skaters
__
only notable grave to the Bozeman
cemetery, for John M. Bozeman, the
great pathfinder, and Henry T. P.
Comstock, whose name was given to
Comstock lode, are also burled there, i
(
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Gasoline Dealers See New Popularity
for Mobilgas Made from Montana Crude
v' :; J
* I 'HIS is a familiar sight—a fresh, new Sign of the Fly*
1 ing Red Horse going up at a service station in Montana«
Mobilgas is a great gasoline to sell at anytime, but today,
in Montana, it has an extra customer-attracting value.
Mobilgas is to be refined from Montana crude in a Mon
tana refinery
newspaper advertising. Get aD the facts today I

.
mmmM
'■ fS
m
fact which it being told the public im
k
B
JOBBERS! Vow mtm invited to ask for d «tailed informa doe a hoi
available Mobilgas distributor franchis« openings in Montana.

' ■
»
'MS
Writ « «r Wir«
SOCON Y- VACUUM
OIL COMPANY. INC.
Gres» Falls
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■hf.
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OttiAnm horsc powm
Ji
•1C»
i
t
In "Grand Hotel
>♦
___
f lirrilI
aHlä» , jS& Ti
■■L - P'
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Ï 4BP * V
.
***3 ^ti^V^o
S inthenew Ä Hoter
scries of drama programs, beginning
° v " t JTÎTÎ
Chattanooga, Tenn.,' she 'livid for a
time in Birmingham, Abu, where she
was active In little theater plays. In
1931 she went to Chicago to study
dramatics at the Goodman theater, and
three years later entered radio. She
will appear In the two-act dramas un
der the direction of Joe Alnley, her
husband.
the_
re--Smith
recently from New York, would present
to the people of Miles City a series of
exhibitions in roller skating for three
nichts
' The Smith brothers proved that they
were really fine roller skaters and
showed the people many intricate
moves on the rollers. Two of their most
spectacular feats were Frank Smith
skating three times around the hall
holding Al standing erect on his shoul
ders. The other was the skating of Al
on stilts of the different heights of
four and six feet. They exhibited a
l>air of stilts eight feet high, but could
not use them because the ceiling of the
rink was too low.
The brothers captured the hearts of
Miles City's skating public and that
meant almost everyone in town, and
when their three nights' entertainment
was finished they were asked to stay
longer. They agreed to do so and made
arrangements with Russel whereby they
toc * ov f r control . of **» n °° r arid made
[ ead X for H a 561,165 of entertainments
for D t ? e ^ wIn »i' ll « 4f f
,
tiäctcd the Smith brothers 85 well &s
the white lights of decent society and
they began to put in much of their
spare time among the residents of the
SB
M
ft, ' tv p|
iS
l
m
M: !.
red lieht district
~ rf
P? Clu-istmas eve, 1885 Miles City
celebrated. At the chinches. In the
co°to<f 'bf'æen Christo^f Æ^k^d
™,ti n nJftt trees decfeed
AhSo vto rhi-tateS* momine the
write? wav hoSe "rom^a 1
Christmas^ daoceAsLwas c^ing !
, h J«t Mata and FHfhh Louis
marshal came running up i
st^et He stoo^d '
^ome on kid l neJTyou TOere is
a row at 27 (a resort on Fifth street)
. there has hggn some s hootine "
1 followed him d^wn the street. JiL
^ we t abreast of a place known
as "Emma the Blonde's" on the comer
of Brid 8 e and Fifth street, we heard
• S fr s ,,ouserollowedby a
King stopped and said; "Maybe we j
ha^ better look Into this first." He
opened the door and we entered with j
revolvers in our hands. At the end |
0 f a short hall we could see a light |
through the transom arrd could hear !
the sounds of a woman crying and!
saying: "What have you done. Prank. ■
You've killed Al." We could also hear i
a sound as though someone was mov- ;
ing about in the room. King tried the
door but it was locked. Just then the
woman screamed again and said:
"Don't shoot, Frank, don't shoot!"
We threw . our combined weights
against the door. The lock
and we literally fell Into
There we saw Prank Smith, fully
dressed, reeling around the room wav
tag a cocked revolver around his head
S.Sr."te l Sf te A , « t h to A
night clothes which were stained with
blood as were the sheets.
In the comer at the foot of the bed
crouched Emma Richmond, "Emma the ,
Blonde." At our abrupt entrance she
screamed again and tainted.
We grappled with Smith and dis
armed him but not before he had
pulled the trigger of the revolver again.
The bullet went into the ceiling. He
made no resistance.
b v this time every inmate of the
place was up and crowded into the
hall and a crowd had gathered out
side. King called to a cowboy named
Rolfe who stood just outside and told
him to go to Savages drug store and
rouse Dr. Redd the coroner. To me, he
gave way
the room.
said: "Kid take charge here till Doc
or I get here. I will take Smith to the
Jail."
The coroner impaneled a
the crowd on the outside of
ing and proceeded to hold an inves
S ry from
e build
e coroner's Jury deliberated a few !
minutes and brought in a verdict that
A1 Smith had been killed by a bullet
fired by Prank Smith and recommend
ed that Frank Smith be held in cus
tody to await the action of the grand
J "2irly on the morning of Dec. 26. It I
was reported that "Emma the Blonde"
had taken a dose of poison the night
before and was dead.
During the early afternoon of Dec.
27, Prank Smith at the county Jail,
came out of his deathlike stupor
"Where Is Al," he said. "This is the
Jail. ain't it? Where Is Al? Did we
kick up any fuss last night? I hope
not "
JliT
gained consciousness, cried like a child,
p his statement made the next day
memb^STÎSthtog ^Uhfd ta£n
T " e 8Tand
His mother came from
Chieago and stayed tUl af ter Ws trial
Î5J^Ô
'Îmc
P? i
riïSïîLrt
re ^ e li^ ( «S d J2,
thin® fwî
tired, Mid In a short while arrived at,
â Y®fdict of not guilty, and Prank
was released. He andhls moth- ;
MUes Clty 016 next day f0E I
A1 £?rà r trnm h ~ v „ rK
h^fdied a^orf^hlle^be- ■
*1®». ur a snort wnue oe |
fore of a broken heart,
t,i(j|aUon.
convened eàrly to
th was indicted
a
for
$2 County Poll Tax,
Collected in State
For 18 Years, Voided
The $2 road tax levied by most Mon- ,
tana counties for the last 18 years, was j
declared unconstitutional to a ruling
handed down by Attorney General H.
J. Preeboum.
Basis of the attorney general's rul
ing, asked by the state board of equal
ization, was a supreme court decision :
handed down to December, 1921, which |
held the "bachelor's tax" was uncon- !
stltutlonal.
The fact the county road tax was
"written off" by the same decision
which voided the "bachelor tax" was
not discovered until this fall.
The attorney general's ruling up- j
held the validity of the road tax col- |
lected by cities and towns.
Commenting on the opinion the state |
board of equalization said:
If it's TEXACO
THEN YOU KNOW IT'S A RELIABLE PRODUCT
OF HIGH GRADE UNIFORM QUALITY
TEXACO PETROLEUM PRODUCTS
Insulated Texaco
Motor Oils
Insulated Havoline Oils
Motor Oils
Engine Oils
Signal Oils
Dynamo Oils
Machine Oils
Cylinder Oils
Cylinder Stocks
Car Oils
Greases
Cup Greases
Gear Greases
Gear Lubricants
Axle Grease
Wire Rope
Lubricants
Pale Oils
Black Oils
A
LEADER
IN EVERY
FIELD
Floor Oils
Waxes
Asphalts
Road Oils
Asphalt Cement
Pipe Coating
Roofing
Roofing Paper
Roofing Cement
Fire-Chief
Gasoline
Sky-Chief
Gasoline
Kerosene
Fuel Oils
Bunker Oils
Diesel Oils
Miners' Oils
Gas Oils
Distillates
Spindle Oils
INTERIATIONAL REFINING COMPANY
SUNBURST, MONTANA
Producers of Gasoline from
Montana Crude Exclusively
THE THAI COMPANY—OFFICES II All PRIICIPAl CITIES
fully with all the attorney
said. We requested the
"We agree
general has
opinion and we feel it will answer
ons received relative to
quest!
liter.
many i
this ma
"Elimination of the county road poll
tax comes in line with this board's
intent to eliminate as many such nuis
ance taxes as possible.
. , ,
Among several other important
chemical elements of the human body.
there is hydrogen In view of the to
flationary state of conditions generally
these days, shouldn't we be looking
into the matter of substituting he
lium?-Kansas City Star..
-$
Bats possess greater flying ability
*"
"The question as to what happens
now as to taxes heretofore paid is
eliminated, inasmuch as the attorney
general has expressed no opinion on
that matter."
DO YOU WANT TO
BUILD A RIG
SKID A DERRICK
LAY A PIPELINE
BUILD A CAMP
?
then
The GALLOPING SWEDE
if
< i
A
s
T>
d.
NO JOB TOO BIG)
NONE TOO SMALL
We have "cats" and trucks. Urge
and small, with which to do any
moving Job quickly and econom
ically. Call us, night or day.
t. HUGO ARONSON
Phone
CUT BANK, MONTANA

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