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Montana oil and mining journal. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1931-1953, March 09, 1940, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075103/1940-03-09/ed-1/seq-8/

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Conover Attacks
Reciprocal Trade
WASHINGTON—Julian D. Conover, secretary of the American Min
ing Congress, appearing before the Senate finance committee last week,
denied that Senate ratification of trade pacts would "blackout" author
ity exercised by the executive and that "ratification is tantamount to
repeal" and charged that trade agreements which cannot obtain rati
fication of elected representatives of the people "can scarcely be in
interest."
Taking issue with Assistant Sec
retary of State Henry F. Grady ov
er Senate ratification. Mr. Conover
"We cannot agree with the
stated: SÜI
implication in these statements that
only the appointed officials of the
trade agreements organization have)
the clear vision, intelligence and
incorruptibility to handle our
tanglements with foreign countries,
and that elected members of Con
re-?ponsible directly to the
en
gress,
people, are incompetent to discharge
their duty to the nation when con
fronted with sectional issues."
Urge* Amendment
Speaking for. all branches of the
ining industry. Conover urged the
Senate committee to amend the ex
isting act in three respects;
Make the law contain a defi
nite requirements limiting our
cessions on any commodity to that
which constitues the prin
1
con
country
ciple source of imports.
2. Incorporate definite provisions
in the existing act to make effec
tive the "escape clause" found in
the various treaties.
3. Require Senate ratification of
all agreements before they become
effective.
Failure to limit our concessions
commodity to the country
the principal
of imports, has resulted In
on any
which constitutes
source
serious damage to domestic miner
al commodities, the mining spokes
asserted. Domestic protection
zinc and cadmium was reduced
in the second Canadian agreement,
although Canada is not the princi
pal or even an important source
of imports, Conover stated. He
charged that the major benefits of
concessions made to Canada were
enjoyed 'by Mexico, Peru, Belgium,
Netherlands, Italy and other coun
tries from whom no correspond
man
on
ing concessions were received in
return.
Escape 4'lauscs
Vigorously urging the adoption
amendment to require use of
of an
the "escape clauses" of the agree-1
ments when it was found that dam-1
domestic industries
Conover scored
age done to
called for relief
the failure of the State Depart
mnt to take action under the escape
clause provided in
agreement:
"The zinc industry affords a con
spicuous example. Producing a bas
ic commodity whose price is govern
ed by the world market, our pro
ducers Immediately suffered the full
cut of $7 per ton which was made
in the Canadian agreement, and this
penalty will persist throughout the
life of that treaty, except for such
temporary and uncertain relief «s
may be afforded by the war's dis
locations. Damage has resulted not
only from greatly increased imports,
but from the depression of domestic
price levels and from the loss of
that confidence in the future so
essential to a natural resource In
dustry which requires years of
preparation before actual produc
tion takes place. The continuance
of this outlook is hound to have
serious consequences upon our fu
ture supplies of a critical war ma
terial.
the Canadian
Zinc Industry's Case
"The zinc Industry's case fulfills
completely the conditions of the
escape clause in the Canadian
treaty. Under this clause our coun
try has the right to withdraw or
modify the concession on any ar
ticle W, as the result of the ex
tension of such concession to other
foreign countries, such countries ob
tain the major benefit of the con
cession, and if in consequence im
ports of
crease to such an extent as to
threaten serious injury to domestic
producers."
Repeated conferences with the
State Department have brought out
clearly that the zinc duty had been
reduced without an adequate com
pensation of the facts, and without
any evidence of such painstaking
and accurate study as is claimed
to be an inherent part of the trade
agreement procedure."
NANCY LEE
RESUMES
DEVELOPMENT
The Nancy Lee
Mines, Inc., is resuming develop
ment work in Us proposed 3.000
foot deeip tunnel which will be
driven to a point 4 00 feet under
the Little Pittsburgh shaft,
shaft is reported to be in a good
grade of commercial ore. A mod
ern mucking machine, mine rails,
oars, and pipe have been installed
and the company expects to make
about 400 feet a month. The pro
posed tunnel is 280 feet below the
one driven into the King and Queen
claims on the other side of the
gulch.
schedule is estimated to cost around
$60,000. The Nancy Lee holdings
Include the King and Queen. Elder,
ado. Keystone. O. R. & N.. Peter
the Great, and the Little Pittsburgh
groups of claims, all located near
here. Milo Skero is mine superin
tendent and Henry H. Ray is gen
eral manager, both of Superior.
L. Brain-ard of Kellogg, Idaho, is
'president.
SUPERIOR
The
The present development
n.
»BND A CONTRIBUTION TO
THE SUNBURST BADGER
DECEPTIVE
PRACTICES
CHARGED
I
WASHINGTON—Alleging the use
of unfair and deceptive acts and
practices in the interstate sale of
instruments intended for locating
gold and silver and in the distribu
tion of a booklet the federal trade
commission has issued a complaint
directed against Henry Bergman.
Springfield. Mo., dealer in such
prod nets.
Thru the use of advertising the
respondent is alleged to have repre
sented to purchasers that the instru
ment offered for sale will enable
a person to locate gold, silver and
hidden treasures and that persons
giving testimonials published by the
respondent have actually located
treasure by using the respondent's
instrument.
The complaint also alleges mis.
representations in the sale of a so
oalled "fortune telling crystal ball,"
"universal good luck coins," and
lists of names and addresses of
concerns selling , devices used in
searching for treasures or minerals.
The respondent's representations
are alleged to be false, misleading
and deceptive because the use of his
commodities will not enable the pow
ers and benefits advertised. Alleg
ing violation of the federal trade
commission act, the complaint grants
the respondent 20 days for filing
answer.
FRENCH BUY
HUGE COPPER
TONNAGE
NEW YORK—The French gov
ernment has placed a new order
for 75,000 long tons of copper
with the same group of producers
that have been supplying the re
public's wartime copper needs, it
was disclosed in metal circles.
The bulk of the tonnage, priced
at 11* cents a pound, at ship-side
will come from foreign properties
of Anaconda Copper Mining com.
pany. Kennecott Copper corpora
tion, and Cerro De Pasco Copper
company. It was also understood
International Nickel company. Ca
nadian producer, would participate
in filling the order.
This order brought to 100,000
tons the total amount of red metal
purchased l>y the French in the
past 30 days.
At the same time Increasingly
heavy Russian purchases of Ameri
can copper were disclosed by an
analysis of figures compiled >hy the
United States Bureau of F'oreign
and Domestic Commerce.
During January, Russia bought
26 603 tons of copper, said by tEe
American Bureau of Metal Statis
tics to be a record, of recent years
at least.
The purchases comprised almost
half the 57,604 tons exported from
the United States to all countries
in January
Rated second for the month as a
foreign purchaser was Japan, which
bought 12,604 tons.
present rate of large scale
purchases began in December, when
the Soviet Union bought 17.057 tons
here, bringing the 1939 copper im
ports from the United States to 22,
74 8 tons—an average of only little
more than 500 tons a month in the
first 11 months of the year.
Copper trade authorities said the
Russian buyers had not disclosed
the use to which the copper was to
be put. but the metal is recognized
as an important war munitions ma.
terial.
"JONESEV" IS ILL
L. E. Jones of Great Falls, vice
president of Hail-Perry Machinery
company, is confined in a local
hospital by illness. His condition
is not critical.
MINES BROKERAGE
COMPANY
P. O. Box 775
Helen», Montan»
GOLD PROPERTIES FOR BALE.
Syndicate Management
FIREPROOF
Leggat Hotel
BUTTE. MONTANA
Alex Leggat, Prop.
RatM, $ 1.00 up
MINING ENGINEERS
GEOLOGISTS
MINING MEN WELCOME
»
#
ui™1
tEDfwggffPr I
ESTABLISH
PUSVIS H
»9
ENGWEER L. D.
RICKETTS MES
IN CALIFORNIA
LOS ANGELES—Dr. Louis D
Rickerts SO, noted consulting
gineer and copper company execu
tive who for many years played an
important part in the development
the western mining Industry,
died March 4.
He had been ill a little more than
month, and his condition became
critical following a major opera
tion three weeks ago.
pn
of
a
Dr. Rickerts rejected an offer of
teaching post at Princeton Uni
versity, his alma mater in favor of
a mining career, and went to Lead
ville. Colo., in 1881 to study geology.
The following year he received his
doctor's degree at Princeton.
He was a director of Phelps Dodge
corporation and had served as con
sulting engineer for Anaconda Cop
per 'Mining company.
Consolidated Copper company and
Green Cananea Copper company.
He also was chairman of the board
of directors of the Valley National
■bank, a state-wide Arizona organi
zation.
He became associated with Phelps
Dodge in 1890 after serving three
Inspiration
years as state geologist of Wyoming,
During his career he held the gen
eral managerships of the Old Do
minion Mining and Smelting com
pany of Globe. Ariz.. Cananea Con.
solldated Copper company of So
nora. Mexico, and of the Calumet
nnd Arizona and New Cornelia
Copper companies.
lie was noted chiefly for his work
for the Inspiration Consoli-|the
in designing and constructing large
concentrating and smelting plants.
He built the plant at Inspiration.
Ariz.,
dated, the first mill to use the flo
tation process which increased the
recovery of copper in concentrators
by about 50 per cent.
Dr. Rickerts last fall was awarded
the James S. Douglas medal of the
American Institute of Mining and
Metallurgical Engineers for "inspir-1
ational leadership and distinguished
achievements in the metallurgy of
copper.'' He served as president of
the institute in 1916 and for many'
years was a member of its board of
directors.
ANACONDA BUYS
B. & S. MINE
PROPERTIES
One of the largest mining deals
that Butte has known in many
years was consummated on Febru
ary 29 and filed with the county
clerk and recorder—the purchase
of the claims of the Butte and
Superior Mining Co., by the Ana-.
conda company. The deal includes
more than 70 mining claims, among
them the Black Rock, Bland, Black
Crow, Bellevue. Allie Bell. Ameri
can Eagle, Bird, Birdseye, Col.
Sellars, Comstock. Constitution.
Copper King, Damarat. Dan Qulip,
Deadwood, the Admiral Dewey and
many others.
The Butte and Superior properties
have been idle for a number of
years. Some of them, particularly
»he Black Rock, were heavy pro
ducers before the depression era
set in. No price is named for the
purchase. The deed is signed by D.
Tackling, president of the Butte
and Superior and George Moser,
secretary. The ground is located in
the northeastern part of the Butte
mining districts.
GOING ON CRUISE
Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Cobb and
Wilfred and Mrs. Nadeau of Cut
Bank sailed on Friday from San
Francisco for Honolulu on a 30
day vacation trip. Cobb recently
bought the Nadeau Brothers produc
ing properties in Cut Bank field for
a reported consideration of $4 00,000.
Office Phone 1929
Ke». Phone 19IT
Office: 303 Con-Hoy Bldg.
E. W. KRAMPERT
CONSULTING GEOLOGIST
CA8PEK, WTO
P. O. Box 1106
Western Iron Works
8
(loetrpmMl
1400 East Second Streei
-Phone 2-3966
i
MONTANA
' BUTTE,

We Carry Stocks of
STEEL AND CAST IB0*N GRINDING BALLS
Sise 2-inch by 4-inch
AMERICAN STEEL SPLIT PULLEYS
COLD ROLLED SHAFTING
SHEET STEEL
e.
STRUCTURAL STEEL SHAPES
HHSH6MKRS
RAMPANT IN
COLORAM
GRAND
Charges were filed against 12 men
in Colorado's third big highgrad
ing case within a month.
Sheriff Guy Warrick of Tellur
! .de said a former Missouri con
vict's love for a friend's wife indi
rectly led to discovery of wide
«preadgold thefts from one of Col.
orado's most historic mines, the
Smuggler Union.
The thefts run between $50,000
and $100,000, the sheriff estimated.
The men charged here are accused
of buying gold from miners who
carried the hlghgrade ore from the
Smuggler Union in small amounts,
in lunch baskets or under their
coats.
JUNCTION . COLO.—
ed.
Four men are under arrest at
Pairplay. high in the Rockies of
central Colorado, in connection with
a widespread highgrading investi
gation which has already sent four
others from that locality to the
state penitentiary for participating
in thefts of gold from Park coun
ity mines. Other arrests are expect
Vanadium Stolen
Evidence of an International
ring of thieves and smugglers shlp
ning vanadium ore from western
Colorado mines to 'both the Sino
Japanese and European wars has
been uncovered 'by
States Vanadium company,
Burwell, president of the corpora
tion. said here.
Burwell said his company was
the United
Blair
tracing recent shipments of refined
vanadium—vital in the hardening
of steel for armaments—outside
United States. Regional offices
of the Federal Bureau of Investi
gation and the secret service in
Denver denied they had any know
ledge of the vanadium company's
allegations.
ing in
International Ring
"We have reason to believe a
ring of international size is opérât.
vanadium and refined ore
taken from our Uravan, Ooio., hold
ings in the west central part of the
state, eventually is finding its way
to belligerent nations.'' the company
president declared.
The company started its inves
tigation last month when it was
discovered in recent weeks approx
imately $30.000 in refined ore was
missing from the company's plant
near Montrose. Colo.
STUDENT FALLS
DOWN OLD
MINE SHAFT
BUTTE—Fred Lines. 18 year old
Junior at Montana School of Mines,
narrowly escaped
afternoon when he
down the Black Warrior mine shaft
north of Rocker while measuring
the headframe. His fall was broken
when he landed lengthwise on a
two by twelve plank across the
shaift and remained there.
Had Lines missed the plank he
would have fallen the remaining
200 feet to the bottom. His injur
ies were limited to a fractured
death Friday
fell 50 feet
shoulder blade, a broken rib, and
bruises and shock.
Heroes of his rescue were James
L. Roe. Butte fireman and Wen
dell Erickson of Alaska, a fellow
student.
MINING MAN DIES
president
Hecla Mining Co., James F. Mc
Carthy of Wallace, Idaho, died to
day. He was 73.
of
SPOKANE—The
W.B. FINLAY, C.P. A.
GENERAL, MINING
AND
OIL FIELD ACCOUNTING
AUDITS, SYSTEMS
TAX SERVICE
First Nation»! Bank Bldg.
MONTANA
GREAT F ALIA,
REES BUYS
EASTON PAG.
MINE, MILL
SPOKANE—His purchase of the
Easton Pacific mine near Virginia
City, Mont., on a bond and lease
from the Elling estate is reported
by James Reed, mine operator of
Twin Bridges, Mont., and Nespelem,
Wash.
One of the older and largest
lode mines of the district, it has
been developed broadly 'below the
tunnel level where large quantities '
of ore remain, Reed reports. Lessees
are shipping a carload a week
the upper levels. The mine was |
operated until recently by the Eas- |
ton Pacific Gold Mining Company, '
headed by Harry Reynolds, 2424
Arlington Avenue. Birmingham,
Alabama. That concern installed
a 75-ton flotation mill which is
included in the present deal. Reed
also operates the High Ridge gold
mine near Twin Bridges with J. C.
Roberts, electric contractor of Spo
kane, Washington.
DIVIDENDS!!
Anaconda will pay a dividend of
25c a share on March 25 to stock
of record March 5. This payment
of 92,1841,580 will bring Anaconda's
total payments to $200,000,000.
Bunker Hill & Sullivan Mining
and Concentrating Company, Kel
logg. Idaho, is pitying a dividend
of 25 cents a share, totaling $327,
000,000 March I, to stock of Febru
ary 15 record. The dividend brings
total dividends to $53,020,207.
Hecla Mining Company, Wallace,
Idaho, will pi?y a dividend of ten
cents a share, totaling *100,000,
Mardi 15 to stock of February 15
record, bringing all lime dividends
to $23,205,000.
HENRY M. LANCASTER
MINING ENGINEER
Ü. 8. MINERAL SURVEY
10 Pittsburgh Block
MONTANA
HELENA,
K. PEBET
9. 9. BBCNKEB
BRUNNER & PEREY
ASSAYING, ORB TESTING,
CONSULTING
U BROADWAY
HELENA.
MONTANA
V. O. Box 704
Phone Z11S-W
Douglas Wilson, Ferris & Co.
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS
Members of
American Institute of Accountants
Ranching — General Accounting
Easiness and Tax Counselors
Oil — Mining
Great Falls, Montana
418-19-20 Strain Bnlldlng
■v ;
SAMPLING
is the process of obtaining from a
lot of ore a smaller quantity that
contains, in unchanged percentages,
all the constituents of the original lot"
—U. 8. BUREAU OF MINES.
« *
This is one of our regular jobs.
D'tring the past 26 years, our Washoe
Sampler has sampled and purchased
for cash millions of tons of gold, silver
and copper ores and concentrates, at
the rate of 1,500 tons a day. . . .
ANACONDA
Copper Mining Company
Butte, Montana
Cloala« QmotMtUmm
om the
STANDARD STOCK EXCHANGE
SPOKANE
By
GIBSON ASSOCIATES, INO.
Great Full«, Montan»
March 8, 1040
20* 32
.49 60
Clayton Silver.
Dayrock .
Golconda .
Grandview .
Hecla Mining.
Jack Waite.
Metaline ..
North Butte.
Montana Silver Queen.
Mont. Consolidated—
Polaris .
Sherman Lead
Standard Silver Lead..
Tamarack ...
Bunker Hill..
5
4
14
13*
7.00
6.76
21* 25
... 42 47
.56 70
8%
10
.3 4 >4
1.00 1.10
.26 35
.9 12
.31 35
12.60 13.40
Lead, New York,
Zinc, New York ...
from;Copper, Domestic,
III jk Ml"f It Ü 1 li if T
SI Jr 8 flit If I IfliîliLîJ
■»■»»»■■■■»■■ UlAVItf
|A|f (Ilf lljr Ml If HR

— ^ — »»»»»» ■ ■■■■M
L (lO Ailfi |M (■ M
1 WH wW 1*1 Sa IS
CURBS
1.25 1.75
1.58 1.75
Callahan .
Pend Oriele..
Premier Gold
Sidney .
1.20
1.01
2% 5
OVER THE COUNTER
Wash. Water Power 110.00
Montana Power Pfd. 106.00
110.50
107.00
METALS
.05*
.0650
11 *
Conditions in Neihart today are
the best they have been for the
past 10 years, declares Tony Faller,
mayor of the mining city. Mining
operations, encouraged by good sil
ver prices, are going forward on
a scale which has not been seen
for a number of years, and as a
consequence, Neihart is enjoying
prosperity.
Many new buildings have been
erected in the town in recent
months, and, with some 300 men
employed in mines in the vicinity,
there is a shortage of houses and
other 'buildings. Faller said.
Four mills are now in operation
at Neihart, he said, and others are
expected to 'begin operation soon.
Those now being operated include
mills for the Florence, Neihart Con
solidated (Hartley), Big Seven
(Silver Queen) and the Star prop
erties.
A mill is built for the Benton
group and Ripple workings, but it
has not yet been placed in opera
tion, as development work is still
in progress at those properties.
The 50-ton mill of the Kites Min
ing Co. is now being built and
should be in operation in aibout
30 days, Faller stated. This will
serve the Broadwater property
which has 'been leased by this group
of operators.
The Galt mine is expected to re
sume operations In the near future,
and it is reported that the Queen
of the Hills properties are also be
ing prepared for operation under
lease sometime soon.

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