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Montana oil and mining journal. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1931-1953, May 17, 1941, Image 4

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I .
^Journal
/^Vonlan
ESTABLISHED 1921 »
PUBLISHED WEEKLY
Owned and published by tbe Montana Oil Journal, a Montana corporation.
Address all communications to 618 First National Bank Bail Mug,
Great Falls, Montons. O. I. DeßCHON. publisher
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
91-60 Per Year in Advance—Canada and Foreign Subscriptions *2.50,
Per Year.
Foreign *1.T6—6 Mon the.
*1.25—6 Months.
Published Every Saturday,
utered ss Second Class Matter, April 23, 1921, at tbe Poet Office
Great Falls, Montana.—Under Act of March 3, 1879.
The Montana OU A Mining Journal endeavors to Insure the honesty
and trustworthiness of every advertisement It prints and avoid the
publication of all advertisements containing misleading statement*
or claims.
ADVERTISING RATES ON APPLICATION
WE BELIEVE
GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS have been definitely pro
ven indisponible in Montana. Every zvildcat shoidd
have both Madison and Devonian 'highs" determin
ed by reflection seismograph before drilling begins.
DEEPER DRILLING is essential to zvritc the real his
tory of the Montana oil industry,
source of Montana petroleum is in formations BE
LCH THE BIG LIME. Abandonment of zvells at
the Madison contact is a roaste of money. Aban
donment of zvells at the Cat Creek horizon is stu
pidity. No zvell shoidd be considered a completion
until it is drilled into the Devonian.
The major
Oil Trade Notes
Of Interest to Refiners and Marketers
Farmers Union Oil Co. has completed its bulk station at Galata and
Roy Edminster is in charge of sales. He was formerly employed at the
Devon Farmers Union station.
Oil Chases Colored Farmers
Away From Farm Second Time
>ld Man Oil again is close on the heels
of tin- William Christian family, wealthy Negroes, who moved from
an 85-acre farm in the heart of the East Texas field 10 years ago
because "it was ruined" by oil wells.
HAWKINS, TEX.
"It looks like we are going to have to quit Hawkins to get
away from oil," Christian said as he and his wife stood in their
front yard and watched the drilling of another well just across the
their Improved farm. Production is fast closing
their 160 acres and
in on
drilling rigs may be chugging away
on their own land.
Before oil was
what is now
Texas field
happily on
Longview and Gladewater.
made a bare living from the place,
hut it was home and they reared
their family there.
During the excitement following
the discovery of oil near their ori
ginal home the Christians leased
their land for a large sum and
then followed the completion of a
number of wells on the farm. Dur
ing the Bush period of production
they accumulated a fortune from
royalties, their income being a
round $5000 a month for some
time. From their wells they still
are receiving $7 00 to $800 a month
income.
discovered in
the booming Bast
the Christians lived
their farm, between
They
It was to get away from oil that
the Christians bought their Haw
kins farm, 25 miles from their
East Texas derrick-covered farm.
In their new location they built
a beautiful home, where they lived
quietly and happily until oil recent
ly was discovered near by.
The Texas Company has advanc
ed the price of Illinois basin crude
oil 5c a bbl. to $1.27 following the
advance announced by Ohio Oil
Co. The company also met the high
er price postings for California
crude oil as initiated by Standard
Oil Co. of California in fields where
its purchases.
CLEVELAND—-Advances of 10c
per bbl. in prices they will pay for
Michigan crudes were announced by
leading purchasers of
Increased postings, with one ex
ception.
these oils.
were retroactive to May
1.
GRIZZLY
m
IV
The
West's most
sensational
and fastest
selling
Gasoline
for
wM
y
I 1
Quicker
starts
Greater
power
Cleaner
motors
More
mileage
11
VM
,1
a
s

a
-
NORTHWEST
REFINING CO.
-.7
A
I
Cut Bank, Mont.
GRIZZLY
KiHswtwrMmi '
t
GASOLINE >
KINC Of THE *640 *
GRIZZLY
(DUBBS CRACKED)
G A S O I NE
soon®--
GASOLINE CHISELING
TORONTO—"There's an epidem
ic ot chiseling for gasoline right
across the country'', says George
II. Cottrelle, Canadian Oil Control
ler. in referring to the distribution
of gasoline. To stop this chiseling
and "to promote orderly marketing''
he lias issued an order, dated April
10. which prohibits the opening of
any new gasoline distribution sta
tion without a permit from him. No
station closed for 30 days after the
dale of the order may be re-opened
without authorization from the Con
troller, but this does not apply to
any station which, in the usual
course, is closed during the winter
months.
SEND A CONTRIBUTION TO
THE SUNBURST BADGER
DOUGLAS WILSON,
FERRIS & CO.
CERTIFIED
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS
Members of
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF
ACCOUNTANTS
( HI— Mining—Ranching—
General Accounting Business
and Tax Counselors
418-420 Strain Bldg. Great Falla
SunWit
CO*Ucr
f
c5ô^
A
L. C. Stevenson, who finnanced
the discovery wells in Kevin-Sun
burst field, denies that he is "back
in the oil business." "A man isn't
in the oil business until he gets
some oil,'' he says.
Just before the concert started
the great singer received a wire
stating that he had just become
the father of twins. Following the
concert one of the spinsters belong
ing to the local committee rushed
up to him back stage and gushed:
"Oh. Mr. A: we girls are SO hap
py for you and we want to know
just exactly how you felt when you
received that telegram."
"I can tell you," the great sing
er replied. "I felt just as if I had
been paid two fees for one perform
ance.''
Little Mary was put in an upper
berth of a sleeping car for the
first time. She kept crying until
her mother told her not to be
afraid, as God would watch over
her.
j
g
HOW THINKING PAYS
T
HE man who has one dollar to invest
possesses that dollar because he
KNEW his business. The man who
has a fortune did not acquire that
wealth by the work of his hands alone.
It is necessary that a man shall take
the earnings of his hands and put those
earnings to work. His dollars will make
more money than his hands can make.
But his dollars will make money only In
the event that they are INTELLIGENTLY
put to work.
No matter what avenue of Investment
a man may choose, he must know the
business into which he launches his in
vestment dollar. The oil busineCs is one
in which the sluggard occasionally makes
money: investing a few dollars in a ven
ture that happens to pay him a hundred
or a thousand-fold. But that ii: the ex
ception rather than the rule.
3
It takes a comprehension of a$y line of
fet It Is
ill Invest
investment to make money,
a patent fact that some men
the education and skill of a lifetime to
accumulate some savings and 'then put
their savings into a line ot investment
they know nothing about. We feel that
no man can make a success in sjometbing
he does not understand. He canpot make
money If he cannot visualize the process
es whereby his savings will double atpd
treble and double again,
that if his savings are ever going to do
any good they must multiply in value
many times over.
m
He knows
In
jp
That applies to royalties as well as to
any other line of Investment. When a
man hears that someone else has made
money In royalties, he is likely to rush
into royalty investments with no idea
what he is doing. Many times we have
received a letter from a potential roy
alty investor enclosing a check, saying:
"Enclosed herewith Is $100. Please in
vest this in royalties for nu©.'' We
promptly send his check back for we
know he will not succeed until such
time as lie knows HOW royalties operate.
We tell him, furthermore, that if it Is
his plan to buy only one royalty, that
he had better not Invest at all. What
if his investment of *100 pays 100%
per annum? That gets him nowhere.
The man who learns that Kevin-Sun
burst royalty has paid an average of
*47.63 per cent per acre, and who thinks
that all he needs to do Is buy a royalty
at $2 or *3 an acre point and receive
*47.63 in return for each *2 or *3- In
vested, must give some time to study of
the history of production In that field.
He must realize that this average is
made up by farms which have produced
more than that amount and an, equal
number of farms that must have pro
duced less, to arrive at that average.
That seems quite simple to a thinking
person but oddly enough there are many
people who refuse to think.
T
1
HINKING is as Important as money.
In making
Thinking people are hesitant about
going into Investments which are like
Investments
today.
Landowners
Royalties Co,
Box 1225
LANDOWNERS ROYALTIES COMPANY,
Great Falls, Montana.
I desire membership In your organization to receive
current publications, maps and, upon my request, offering |
sheets descriptive of available royalty properties.
1
F=
r:
IL
1
4-7*1
(Your Name In Full)
=3
1

HEAD OFFICE:
GREAT FALLS. MONTANA
3
tt:
1
i.
t
"Mother — you there?" she cried.
"Yes. dear."
"Father—Are you
there?'' she
cried. , ..
-Yes Mary, now go to sleep,
replied 'her father. A fellow travel
lost patience at this point and
shouted. "Yes. by thunder—we're
father, mother.
IT
all here, your
brother, sister, aunts, uncles and
cousins—all
sleep."
There was a pause
softly, "Mamma."
"Yes, dear."
"Was that God?"
here—now go to
then very
« • 6 % •
A city man crawled over a fence,
only to find himself in a pasture
with a vicious-looking bull.
he called to a
farmer, "is this bull safe?''
answered
"A durn sight safer than
there,"
''Hey,
the
is,"
"He sure
farmer,
you are."
• •
They tell about the girl who fell
down at Camp Lewis and made *35
before she could get up.
Many a heaving bosom Is noth
ing more than a hope chest.
• •
"I want a suitable gift for a
wealthy old aunt who is awfully
weak and can hardly walk."
Clerk: "How about some floor
wax?"
A girl may be both ignorant and
shapely but she is never ignorant
of the fact that she is shapely.
Girls who keep on slapping faces
Don't see sights and don't go
places.
«
Girls who do not kiss at partin'
Don't get asked again, that's sar
tin.
ly to ibe depreciated or wiped out at
the end of the world war. Thinking
people are today looking far ahead in
their Investments.

To thinking people, landowners' roy
alties afford perhaps greater safety than
any other form of Investment. The pur
chase of royalties is the purchase of
OIL IN UNDERGROUND STORAGE. If
a man can buy oil cheaply, he has lit
tle to worry about. We know that petro
leum Is something that is not going to
be depreciated in value as time goes
on. Metals and other essential commod
ities may depreciate in value with the
close of the war, but the increasing use
of petroleum means that every recover
able (barrel of oil must some day be
brought to the surface of the ground.
As the supply of petroleum decreases, as
it inevitably will, the value of crude
will increase to a point where synthentlc
materials may be employed.
Money invested in royalties is tax
free: an important factor is choosing a
safe investment. The law provides for
taxation of the INCOME of royalties,
which may be spread out over many
years, but the royalties themselves, with
out production, are not subject to the
heavy burden of taxes that everyone
knows is upon us. Thus a man may buy
a royalty which entitles him to 100,000
barrels of oil In underground storage,
yet he will pay no taxes on that fortune
until the oil is removed from the ground
by one of the producing companies. Many
Kevin wells bave been producing for
eighteen years, while Cat Creek field
wells have been producing for over nine
teen years, giving some Idea of longivity of
production. So it is that the returns
from an investment made today, no mai
ler how great, will likely be spread out
over 20 years or more.
Before buying a royalty, an investor
must have some idea what his risk may
be and understand something of his pos
sible profits. He will not spend ?100
in buying a royalty that will pay him
back just *100 or even $200. He must
have greater odds. It is possible to arrive
at a general idea of how much oil e given
tract of land will produce; whether it
wll) make 1,000 barrels per acre or
5,000 barrels or 10,000 barrels. The
probable yield varies in the several
fields and in the several oil states. The
California royalty investor cannot apply
Signal Hill field measurements of prob
able yield to any Montana field yet
discovered. Likewise the Montana Inves
tor cannot measure -possible odds by the
actual history of Cat Creek fields—be
cause Cat Creek has produced far more
oil per acre than any other field thus
far developed.
The person who makes a careful study
ot Cat Creek, as compared with Kevln
Sunhurst, will realize that Cat Creek
is a sharply folded,
where the pool of oil is confined in a
relatively small space—less ~Than
section. So the yield per acre in Cat
Creek amounts to *36,000 worth of oil
faulted structure
one
Sizmo Sam says; "An old maid
is a young woman who says 'no'
until she is too old to say 'yes.'
A young flapper breezed into a
florist shop and looked around the
shelves for something she wanted.
Spying an old fellow puttering a
round a plant in the corner she
walked over to him.
"Have you any passion pcuppy?"
she inquired.
The old fellow lopked up in sur
prise.
"Gol ding It!" he exclaimed.
"You just wait 'til I get through
pruning this lily."
• • »
A hunter was showing off his
collection of trophies to a group of
visitors. He was rapturously ex
plaining how he had acquired the
various exhibits.
"See that elephant?" he said. "I
shot it in my pajamas."
"My goodness," murmured the
surprised young lady. "How did it
get there?"
GLACIER COUNTY
By Otoctar Conaty Abstract Co.
CUT ANK, MONTANA
AMENDMENT of oil and gas lease
Paul Johan Hansen, to Santa Ttita
Oil & Gas Co. extends term 7 yîars from
Nov 4. 11(40 NW4 Sec. 23, NJSWJ SW4
»IV j See. 24-38-5. *280.
ASSIGNMENT OF ROYALTY
G. K. Gallogly to Jean P. Hurlv 1-16
of 1% Lots 7, 8, » Sec. 24 NE4 N|SE4
See. 23-33-0
Itev. J. M. Nolan feo Unit Trust Co.
4 of 1% SW4SE4 SE4SW4 Lot 4 Sec.
31-34-5. Lot 4 Sec. 6-33-5
D. D. Warner to Ralph Arrlson 4 of
1% SW} Sec. 13-34-6.
G. E. Gallojflv to Ewald T. Ryden
1-8 of 1% Loth 7, a », Sec. 24. NE4 NJ
SE4 Sec, 23-33-6
O, E. Gallojrly to Harry L. Vorse. &
Harriet N. Vorse. 1-8 of 1% Lots 7, 8, 9,
as compared with *4,763 worth of oil
per acre in Kevln-Sunburst field. But
Kevin field has more than sixty times
as much producing area as Cat Creek
and will have an ultimate production
many times greater than the total yield
of Cat Creek.
This leads us to careful study of each
potential new oil field. Wildcatting is
no longer a hlt-and -miss proposition.
Oil prospectors are taking the risk out
of their drilling by the use of science
and the several wells drilling in new ter
ritory in Montana today are far more
likely to succeed than those of any pre
vious year. There Is no honest person
of. intelligence who will today state
that no more oil fields or no more pro
ducing horizons will be found in Mon
tana. It follows that the person who
knows something about the history of
development of present productive fields |||
can know what to expect On the several
types of folds. He can easily ascertain
whether a potential new oil field has
the characteristics of Cat Creek—with
sharp folding and faulting—or the char
acteristics of a broad dome such as
Kevin field. He then knows better what
to expect and can place his investments
accordingly.
|P
Pioneer investors in . Montana oil, many
of whom have made £reat
er had opportunity <
ed today. We who
opments of the last two decades are arm
ed with guidance that safeguards us from
mistakes of the past. Our investments
are far safer and the outlook more cer- Ep
tain.
fortunes, nev
lal to that afford
ave studied devel
1
w
E have bought royalties on or
close to all but one of the most
promising "wildcat
tests
now
drilling In Montana today. Through these
Investments (because we know that the
prices paid were right) we are confi
dent that some of our members are going
to make profits equal to or greater than
those which "gave us our start" in Kev
in pioneering days.
n
The ones who. profit most will be
those who have Invested thinking along
with their money. They will Jtnow how
to profit most by their success; whether
to sell at a cash profit or whether to
sell a part and keep a part 'else keep
it all. Those Important decisions
essential to success as the cash which
was required for the Investments.
are as
This organization renders a service to
royalty Investors which affords oppor
tunity to arrive at a fairly Intelligent
understanding of the Montana oil In
dustry. We deal in royalties In no other
state than Montana. We confine our ef
forts to capitalizing things we have
known intimately during the past eight
een years. Our publication* and bulle
tins are invaluable to a royalty investor.
Membership in the organization requires
a fee of *1 to cover cost of maps and
reports.
1
Sec. 24. NKJ NJ.SKJ Sec. 23-33-6
IO nun a C. Mattson et con to S, F
Walter 14% NWJNW* Sec. 14. St
Ntt J Sec. 14-34-6
Same to same 1 3-4* NJSWi Sec. 14
Snme to same 1 % WJNEJNWJ Sec. 14
:;i r.
34«
l.yal W. Lindquist et ux to GW. Falls
Nat. Bank 12%, SJSEJ Sec. 17 XEi
NEtXWiJ Lots 1, 3. 4, 3, NISEI SEi
SE4 Sec. 20, NJ8WJ See. 21, tot 1
21-33-5 6J% SJSWi Sec. 21. NffJ
NKJ NE4.NW* Sec. 28 32-5
OIL AM) (IAS LEASE
Itlackfeer Tribal Business Council to
A. B. Cobb & C. W. Jeffrey, doing busi
ness os A. B. Cobb & Company SINWi
Sec. li)-32-3. minimum of 2 wells
RIGHTS OF WAY
Claude S. Bailey et ux, to County cf
Glacier, part of Lot 3 Sec. 7-33-5. *200.
Julius Bonnet to Internatlonsl f'ipe
£c" e 17^2-5*°|04.36. NWiNWi 8W ** W *
SE4NE4 s" da Ï8-S-5 UX t0 * CrJ8S
Lyai \V Lindquist et ox fo same,
^ross NE4 SE4 NW4SE4 SW4SE4 «.■<■
18. Lot 2 Sec. 19-32-5. ÎJ4» 'M
annual statement
, «T* 1 ® C rtf k Producers, Inc. Curt Bank
to Tbe Public. Cap. stock $000,000.00. Cap
invested In Mont. *470,000.00. Business
Mont l<m *s 7§ j« 1 *' *! Am , t ex SP e "de<i In
*5,722.48, Logs *10,1(44.35.
It C. larrant. Out Bank, V p~„ Oolet
Gallatin. Big (Horn, Wyo, Sec' Troas
Marry Welch, Cut Bank.
ii'
Pres.
SEND A CONTRIBUTION TO
THE SUNBURST BADGER
Oil Insurance
Handled.by
Experts
PHONE 0808
GREAT FALLS.
MONT.
*OOW
CAU A MAM M TMC

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