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Montana oil and mining journal. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1931-1953, February 28, 1942, Image 8

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075103/1942-02-28/ed-1/seq-8/

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EjSTABUS II
PUETk^lEi
19 >1
Billions Won't Build Battleships
If Metals Are Still in the Hills
It has taken a war to show the people of the United States the dangerous
New Deal reforms which have in recent years halted metal mining, in the
opinion of Charles P. Willis, editor of The Mining Journal of Phoenix, Says
the Journal:
You can authorize thousands of shipyards, airplane plants, tank assembly
lines, munitions works, and accessory plants, but they are worth nothing as
to production until the stream of raw materials can be developed and directed
to them. Furthermore, you cannot even build all the plants that may be de
sired until the raw materials needed therein are ready.
Yet less has been done in developing metals and other raw materials than
In any other line of war activity. There still seem to be many people in Wash
ington who believe that metals can be obtained by pressing a button or turn
ing on a spigot. They know vaguely that we have a country in which the re
sources of the metals are ample for all needs, except in a few isolated instances,
but they have not shown that they appreciate that these metals are largely
still locked up in the ground and that it takes time, money and. what is more
important, visible encouragement to get them out.
So far the potential producers of metals have been hamstrung and hog tied,
yet that which they have to offer is the very first requirement if we are ulti
mately to have sufficient ships, tanks and planes. Plans for adequate metal
production should have started years before the plans for production of those
things into which the metals are made and we are Just beginning to see some
evidence that the Importance of all-out metal production is appreciated. In
some branches of our complicated governmental setup, no evidence of this
fact is to be seen yet. '
In an effort to supply a demand that was not prepared for, that which we
have is being bled white and the future of the nation handicapped while those
resources which the country has In storage are still slumbering even though,
in many instances, their only utility is under such emergency conditions as
now exist. A high government official recently said, "There may come a time
when we would give all the gold at Fort Knox for one trainload of manganese
ore." This statement is worth thinking about.
There is nothing new in what is being said. The story has been told time
and again for several years, but it has fallen on deaf ears. While it is rather
late to wake up, we do know the extent of the bottleneck in metals and should
do something about it. There is nothing extraordinary or unusual about what
should be done. It is a simple common-sense program which needs intelligent
and unprejudiced direction by people who have a broad understanding of the
mining industry.
We can appropriate untold billions for war equipment, but we can never
get the equipment until we first obtain that with which to make it and we
cannot win the war until we get the equipment. Even though late, we had
better start doing the Job logically, the first thing first. The cost is inconse
quential when related to the billions being spent. More important even than
finance, however, is the need of sympathetic understanding and encouragement,
PHILIPSBURG
WILL BE BOOM
MINING CAMP
Construction of a $1,000,000 manga
nese plant at Philipsburg will result
In making a boom town out of the
famous o!d camp and the development
SW tons of ore a day, the capacity
of the mill, mean capacity oper
ation for the mines of the district.
The most recent report on the dis
trlct was issued last year by the U. S.
Geological Survey. It was issued under
direction of J. T. Pardee but was writ
ten by E. N. Goddard of the survey
part of the 1940 strategic minerals
vestigations. Glenn Reed, E. P. Kauser
and W. T. Pecora assisted in the field
work.
The report states that most of
ore mined has contained between
and 54 percent manganese, but recent
ly ore containing as little as 15 percent
has been mined. Production having
followed development so closely, there
is little reserve ore in sight. The dis
trict, primarily a silver camp, produced
close to 200,000 tons of manganese dur
ing the World war. Production since
that time has been small but steady.
Because of its distance from the
large steel manufacturing centers, the
district was unable to compete with
other sources of manganese in the
metallurgical market. Two of the four
mills built at Philipsburg remain, each
of 50-ton daily capacity, and are treat
ing ore. These are the Trout and the
Moorlight mills. The Trout mill uses
tables and flotation and the Moorlight
plant is equipped for both wet process
and dry magnetic separation.
A full description of the district, its
past and Its future, is given. Geologic
plans and sections are included, show
ing the Headlight, West Algonquin,
Bernard, Trout and Scratch Awl mines,
and a contour map of the district.
Lexington Mine
Shows Big Gain
In Net Profits
_, .. , JV
Net production of the Lexington
Mimng Co., operating the Big Seven
property near Neihart, was $120,968
"L"® f ec °? d Quarter compared with
$69.603 In the second quarter of 1940,
according to a report of C. J. Batter,
treasurer, Washington, D. C.
Net income in the first six months
of this year before provision for taxes
on income was $29,542 as compared
with $13,141 in the same period last
year,, says the report.
Donald A. Callahan, Wallace, Is
president of the company. A new silver
lead-gold vein was recently opened up
in a winze sunk from the main work
ing tunnel. H. J. Evans is general
superintendent.
1*
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H
MORE METALS AND
MORE OIL NEEDED,
SAYS SEC. ICKES
A further statement of his plans to
develop natural resources in the war
effort was made this week by Harold
the^oUowlnir s " cretary ' including
Meta is-"The .geological .survey
^ the bureau of mines * are p re pared
to turn known but unused lo P w .grade
mate rials into metals more vital than
g 0 j d >- N ew processes to be sought to,
make manganese, and new manganese j
plants to be established in Arizona,!
Arkansas, New Mexico, Minnesota I
Montana, Nevada, South Dakota and
Utah. Aid to be given for establish
as j ment of new plants to process alu
in- I min urn, make alum for aluminum
1 processing, and produce chromium
concentrates fob low-grade ores In
creased exploration In western' and
southern states for copper, zinc, lead,
iron, chromite, vanadium, mercury and
tungsten sources.
2. Oil — "Domestic production may
have to be raised to 1,500,000,000 barrels
a year" to meet requirements of the
war machine of the United Nations.
Petroleum production to be organized
for maximum production without
harm to fields, and exploration for
new reserves to be speeded. New and
more efficient transportation methods
to be sought, and production of syn
thetic rubber from petroleum to be
planned.
30
Mountain View
Mine Purchased
By Spokane Man
LIBBY—C. W. Brockman of Spokane
has purchased the Mountain View
Mining Co. properties from W. E. Wil
liams of Libby. The property is located
in the Silver Butte district south of
Libby and has been developed for sev
eral years. Brockman stated that he
will start construction of a 50-ton mill
as soon as weather permits and will
immediately put crews to work block
ing out more ore. It is a silver-lead
property.
TALK NEW ZINC PLANT
According to the recently formed
Pacific Northwest war industries com
mission an electrolytic zinc plant may
be built in Oregon or Washington
Geologists of both states have been
asked to send data on the region's zinc
resources to Commission Chairman
Ivan Bloch in Washington.
!
I
Douglas Wilson,
Ferri s & C o.
CERTIFIED
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT*
AMERICAN INSTIT U TE OF
ACCOUNTANTS
Oil — Mining — Ranching — G«MraI
Accounting Biirtn— and
«IS-4M Strain Mil
Oraal Mb
T
FOR SALE
20,000 K. W. FAIRBANKS
MORSE D. C. plant. In good
condition.
Has been displaced by A.
C. Power.
Will sell complete plant
for $1,500.
WRITE OWNER
P. O. Box 1225
GREAT FALLS,
f
MONT.
RED LODGE—A letter to the Cham
ber of Commerce from the Metals Re
serve Co., subsidiary of the Reconstruc
tlon Finance Corp., indicate« the
govemment contemplates development
of the chrome deposits on the Boulder
river immediately, along with a road
from the mining area to Big Timber
bôulder Y river
CHROME DEPOSIT
'The importance of the chrome de
posits on the Boulder river is fully
realized by this company, and you will
be interested to know," the letter says,,
"that steps are being taken for 1m
mediate development of one of these
areas, which has already been carefully
mapped by the United States Geolog
ical survey and trenched by the United
States bureau of mines. The corres
ponding steps for road developments,
from the Boulder to railhead are part
of the program and are now under
consideration."
Finance of the development by con
tract with private concerns would be
the policy of the company. The Boul
der deposits are part of a vein of
chromium ore extending from the
Boulder to the Red Lodge area.
-<S>
v/i m
10 Billion T OUS
Mfinnnnoso Hri> in
'■VianganeSe \jrC in
Chamberlain Area
^UamOCTiain Ar€tt .
Construction of a plant utilizing the
matte smelting process to produce
315.000 long tons of manganese metal
at Chamberlain, S. D., together with
the mining of 50,000,000 tons of ore
means the opening of a deposit that
is adequate to care for all the normal
requirements of the United States for
1.000 years, according to the South
Dakota State School of Mines,
The Missouri river deposits are ex
tremely low-grade and could not be
developed in competition with import
ed manganese. It has been estimated
at , 10 billion tons. It is a steam shovel
operation and the matte smelting
process will make it possible to con
tinue the development even after the
war.
Nearly all the manganese used in
the steel industry has been imported in
the past. About 14 pounds of manga
nese is used in the manufacture of
each ton of steel.
Qn Prichard Creek
R
Porter Bros., conducting successful
placer operations in Last Chance
Porter Brothers
Testing Placer
gulch north of Helena, are testing
Prichard Creek placer near Wallace
and have taken over a lease on 2,800
acres from the Coeur d'Alene Mining
Co " Preparing to put on a heavier
drUUng rl * to thoroughly prospect the
ground a t depth. About 11 miles of
ground of which four miles is
along Prichard creek, is included in
* ease -
New Operators
Are Unwatering
Drumlummon Mine
The Montana Rainbow Mining Co.,
is at present engaged in repairing and
un watering the No. 1 shaft to the 700
foot level in the Drumlummon mine.
The concern is a mining partnership
of R. S. Rheem and W. R. Wade of
San Francisco and Libby Wade is in
direct charge.
The mine was recently acquired by
the operators under a 20-year lease
and mine development is being pointed i
toward later construction of a 150-ton j
mill. The property is an old gold pro
ducer, discovered by the late Thomas
Cruse and operated for some years by
the Montana Co. Ltd. of England.
ZINC MINERS GET RAISE
WASHINGTON — The war labor
board unanimously granted a 25 cents
a day wage Increase to 440 midwest
zinc miners but warned that the de
cision did not imply general approval
of blanket pay increases.
Ingersoll-Rand
MINING EQUIPMENT
Compressors (15 to 90 Horsepower sizes)
Hand Shanking Devices
Centrifugal Pumps
Drifter Drills
Pneumatic Grinders
Jackbits
Jackmills
Hoists
Sinker Drills
Stopehammer Drills
Jackhammer Mountings
Jackbit Grinders
Jackrods and Drill Steel
Rock Drill Mountings
Hand Blacksmith Tools— for Bits and Shanks
Oil Furnaces — for Forging and Tempering
RAND-INGERSOLL ACCESSORIES OF ALL KINDS
Montana Hardware Co
BUTTE—GREAT FALLS
Production of
j\ r on-Met allies Is
Growing Industry
The production of feldspar In South!
Dakota during 1941 showed an increase
over 1940. according to figures com
piled by H. H. Stewart, South Dakota
mine Inspector. The total 1941 estl
mated tonnage Is 71.730, an Increase
of 11,970 tons over 1940. Among
states South Dakota has been
leading producer of ground feldspar,
and has been second In the amount
of both crude and ground feldspar
produced, and It would not be surpris
ing if South Dakota ranked first
1941 In the amount of combined crude
and ST 01111 * 1 feldspar,
South Dakota was second in the
production of bentonite during 1940
! and 15 ex r*cted to hold the same po
1 sition in 1941. The figures, Stewart
! pointed out, are estimated from car
,oad shipments. Wyoming led in ben
I tonlte production last year. A total
1.648 carloads of bentonite was shipped
( ioai
L iS,"
1 B 11 fourche where three
„ ,,, _
Eastem clay Products are
a _
j ,
OrCOOTl ßriflCS HI OU
! Tr . , , __ . a
/ Iß lu Irl agUCSlUnt
rttrtm«? orp_tf
tVlp
( fV ,„ rirnHl ,„ fl - r ,
ïarnev vaUev TiTTST SS® £
o T Atwood to be underlaid with
magnesium brine with a larger and
heavier content than ocean water Ae
cording to Atwood Harney valley brine
k the strongest that ha* been dkeov.
erpd ^ the Pacific Northwest and ^t
" needed to provide maSum to fiï
fh „ -„.„irsmonk in tv.»
f air ^ anes Harnev countv Develon
ment (to com3 of AtwoS Otto
r „ h rharipiRscinK «.nd pà„i v
Pierson ^ le^« on M000 acres
jn the and thl _ comDa Wls said
hn ,.„ t*
I* raiifnrnia—JmrvH-font -nntractino
nnfl ^, in hniidimr 8
1 g
mills, the P. E. Schundler, American
-«en
Butte Miners Are
Buying Defense
Bonds Every Month
BUTTE—All employes of the Ana
conda Copper Mining Co. in Montana,
Idaho and Wyoming have an oppor
tunity to participate in a voluntary
payroll deduction plan for purchase
of defense bonds now effective.
Employes will specify the amount to
be deducted from pay checks, and
when enough for a bond has been ac
cumulated, it will be Issued to the
individual or beneficiary.
It is expected more than 12,000 ac
counts will be Involved.
«*
WAGE BOOST REJECTED
WASHINGTON
The war labor
board rejected a $1 a day wage in
crease and a union shop request for
700 C. I. O. workers of the Phelps
Dodge Corp.'s smelter division at
Douglas, Ariz., on the grounds such
action would upset existing A. P. L.
contracts covering a majority of the
DEMAND ALUMINUM STOCKS
The U. S. government has picked
up all "idle aluminum" in the hands
of American industry, offering to buy,
but if owners will not sell it will be
requisitioned. U. S. expects to get 20,-
000,000 pounds of aluminum thereby.
-$
METALS FOR VICTORY
The Montana Power Co. is constant
ly delivering to the Anaconda Copper
Mining Co. alone, over 200,000 elec
trical horsepower for the production
of Montana metals vital to victory.
•- $ -
IRVING IN BUTTE
I. G. Irving, mining geologist, has
moved from Los Angeles to Butte, !
where he will headquarter while look- (
ing after some Montana mining in
terests.
SPECIAL PAINTS
And Roof Coating
For The Oil And
Mining Industry
"ACORN PRODUCTS"
C. M. Rods
20 Granite Building
HELENA
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SAYS—
Single-Phasing
"Single-Phasing" is the term gener
ally used to define the condition when
only two of the three wires to a three
phase motor are live.
Three-phase, 60 cycle, 240 volt or 480
volt are the two most common forms
of electric power serving Industrial
loads. Three wires are required
transmit three-phase power and ener
gy. The Impulses of power in the three
wires come in sequence, very much
like the cylinders firing in a three
cylinder gasoline engine. Any two wires
of a three-phase, three-wire circuit
a single-phase source of power. With
only two wires, the Impulses of energy
oscillate much like a teeter-totter.
The winding of a three-phase motor
is in three symmetrical groups that
have three loads brought out to con
nect to the three line wires. (Most
modem motors are of dual voltage for
operation on either 240 or 480 volts.
These motors have nine wires brought
out to a terminal box on the motor
to permit convenient connection for
either voltage.) The sequence of elec
trical impulses into the motor winding
produces a rotating field in the stator
(stationary part) which produces a
torque in the rotor (rotating part) and
I causes it to rotate and develop power
at the shaft. That is why the three
phase motor is such a simple and re
liable device.
If a two-wire single-phase source is
connected to any two of the three
leads of a three-phase motor, it will
produce an oscillating (teeter-totter)
field Instead of a rotating field, and
the motor will stand and growl like
a dog protecting a bone. Under these
conditions the motor will draw many
times full load current, and will bum
out very quickly unless disconnected
from the line by a motor starter
equipped with proper heaters,
any reason, thé motor will continue
to run on single-phase, by producing
its own rotating field. It will carry up
to approximately its full load rating,
but the current in the two remaining
wires will be approximately double.
This increased current in part of the
motor winding will bum out the motor
in short order unless properly pro
tected by a motor starter and proper
heaters. The motor generally howls a
bit under this condition, as though
protesting the rough treatment.
"Single-Phasing" may be caused by
the blowing of a fuse, the breaking
of a wire, or a bad connection, any of
which can happen without warning.
Only starters equipped with proper
heaters can protect the motor from
damage caused by "single-phasing."
That is the reason starters and proper
heaters should be installed for each
motor.
In case a three-phase motor is run
ning and one wire is disconnected for
I
Send in a Contribution to the Badger
FIREPROOF
LEGGAT HOTE
BUTTE, MONTANA
ALKZ LEGGAT, PROP.
IstM, HR wp
MINING ENGINEERS
GEOLOGISTS
MINING MEN WELCOME
I
I
THIS TIME
A COPPER PROSPECT
Here is an example of a miner who wants
someone to help finance opening up a mine
that may make some contribution to the
war effort through the development of
copper in a new district. The letter to the
Mining Editor of the Journal follows;
My partners and I have a prospect in the Little Belt
mountains and we are looking for someone with some cap
ital to take hold of it and develop it into a mine. I call It
a prospect although it Is patented ground and over $10,000
has been spent on- It already. There Is an old shaft down
approximately 65 feet with probably between 175 and 200
feet of drifts and cross cuts at the bottom and It Is all In
ore. Assays show It to be principally gold, sliver and copper,
with copper predominating. We have assays showing over 6
percent copper. Directly down the mountain from the shaft
a tunnel has been run In 452 feet and it will tap the lead
at a depth of 300 feet below the top of the shaft. A sur
veyor's calculations predict that the lead will be struck in
approximately 72 feet from the breast of the tunnel. We will
give a lease and bond or sell, retaining
gross income—Just so we can get the property in operation.
GEORGE H. GO YENS.
Stanford, Mont.
1
royalty of the
Anyone interested in a property of this type may contact Mr. Goyins.
We have received a few more listings of lead-sine properties which
will be forwarded to any who desires to check them np.
WRITE, WERE OR CALL
MINING EDITOR
MONTANA OIL & MINING JOURNAL
618 Pint National Bank Bldg.
Great Fallt, Montana
!-?


COST AND INC OMIS
B
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10
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T Zl 6,1
Texas Oil Piles Up
AUSTIN, Tex.—Texas oil production
is becoming less each week. Glutted
storage resulting from shortage of
transportation is generally blamed.
One major executive said his com
pany's tanks in west Texas are full «ml
oil can't be brought to the coast be
cause tanks there are full also. He said
from 10 to 15 percent too much oil
is being produced all over the state.
Transfer and sinkings of tankers is
blamed, together with slowdown dua
to tankers tying up at night to escape
subs.
closing Quotations
on the
STANDARD STOCK EX CHANG*
SPOKANE
Ry
GIBSON ASSOCIATES, INC.
Great Falls, Montana
FEBRUARY 28, 1942
Coeur d'Alene Mines....
Clayton Silver.
Dayrock.
Golconda.
Grandview..
Hecla Mining.
Jack Waite.
Metaline.
North Butte.
.95
1.00
21
25
65
95
4%
6
14%
13i
5.40
6.00
11 %
14
OVER THE COUNTER
Mont. Power Pfd..
Wash. Waterpower
METALS
Copper Domestic.
Archie j. g«o<uii
J
;
e»tabii*h«d ibo*
20
2S
50
60
36i
40
9
71
Lead.
Standard Silver Le.
Sunshine Consolida'
Tamarack.
Bunker Hill.
33
88
ad...
tied..
6
3
18%
20
46
48
10.10 10.50
CURBS
i Callahan.
Pend Oriele..
Premier Gold
65
99
1.15
129
60
32
102.00 105.00
95.00 100.00
New Old
.17 .12
.11 .082«
.0925 .069
Zinc, East St. Louis
Lead, New York.
A. T. Trent
GOODALL BROS.
ASSAYEBS AND CHEMISTS
Shipp«» representative«, Anae«n4a, Great
Palis and East Helena.
Helena, Ment.
"TRY A SHOT OF
GOLD MEDAL
EXPLOSIVES
Gelatines
Semi-Gelatines
Dynamites
Oil Well Explosives
Permlssables
Pellett Powder
Black Powder
Blasting Supplies- Fus
GOLD MEDAL EXPLOSIVES
DISTRIBUTORS
Wörtern Montana Marble * Granit«
M l—ola
Calrd Engineering, Helena
S. Gianninne, Sand Conic«
Bob Gohn, Virginia City

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