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Montana oil and mining journal. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1931-1953, March 28, 1942, Image 6

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BROAD PROGRAM
OF DEVELOPMENT
IN WEST SLATED
INTERIOR DEPARTMENT READY
TO HARNESS BIG PROJECT
TO WAR EFFORT
The department of the Interior
jady, upon congressional authoriza-1
ion, to act Immediately In harnessing
to the war effort the vast mineral and
power resources of the nation. Secre
tary of the Interior Harold L. Ickes
said, in laying before the senate a
posed expansion program of mineral
and power developments In the United)
States scaled to help meet the enor
mous demands of the presidents war
production schedule.
Secretary Ickes submitted, in re
sponse to an inquiry from Senator
Joseph C. O'Mahoney of Wyoming, de
tails of a program which would use
low-grade domestic ores to help make
the United States independent of for
elgn minerals during the emergency,
save millions of tons of shipping, re-j
tease the necessary navy convoy ves
sels, and would also look toward the;
0f the WeSt
The multipoint resources mobiliza
tion program proposed Included the
financing of mineral and Industrial
development, avoiding monopolization,
and the development Of additional
power facilities to meet war require
S and later to serve America in
ueace It Included sample power proj
ects out of many possible developments
In the west. These 17 sample projects
in 12 states alone would provide 10
billion kilowatt-hours of energy an-1
nually.
Three major "bottlenecks" in this
11-out program were Identified by
ecretary Ickes as being production,!
xploration and capitalization. To
olve "bottleneck NO. 1," he asked that;
he bureau of mines be Instructed by
congress to push to a "triple-speed
basis" the development Of processes to
molro nnqsihlp the larep-sralp utlllza
make possioie tne large scale uuuza
tion Of low-grade ores, and to make
these processes available to Industry,;
even to the extent nt providing mere:
Of new processes with the part-time
services Of skilled engineers.
All-Oat Exploration
Secretary Ickes asked congress to,
make funds available for exploratory
work by the geological survey and thej
bureau of mines for copper, iron,
chromite, zinc and lead. Involving thej
assignment of 250 additional engineers!
and eeoloelsts to intensive exploratory
ana geologists to intensive exploratory,
work in low-grade areas in a tentative
list of 22 states and Alaska. This would
break "bottleneck No. 2."
To secure capital for the develop
ment of short-lived or low-grade ore
bodies and for mills and smelters to
develop such low-grade materials, a
problem termed "bottleneck No. 3,"
Secretary Ickes proposed that, when
requested by the war production board,
he department of the interior should
<e given the power to certify to the
leconstructlon Finance Corp. for loans
o companies or individuals seeking to
ncrease the production of these es
entlal war minerals. As a last resort,
if private capital or competent man
agement would not be interested in
developments of considerable risk, he
suggested that the bureau Of mines
be allowed to develop the mines
custom mills or refineries.
New Processes
Other proposals Included the estab
lishment of a minerals policy board,
recommendations for manganese de-|
velopment involving the erection of
eight large milling plants, three hydro
metallurgical processing plants, and
one matte smelting plant; recommen
dations for the revision of aluminum
manufacturing processes to make the
fullest possible use of new processes
developed by the bureau of mines
which utilize common aluminum
bearing materials; and recommenda
tions for the use, when completed, of
new processes for the production of
magnesium, chromium, vanadium, sup
erphosphate and phosphorus in suffi
cient quantities for war needs.
Increase Western Power
Steam and hydropower plants were
recommended at many points through
>ut the west. A series of 17 sample
»wer projects, at an estimated total
ost of $350,603.000, was proposed.
"The measure I have suggested
bove, under the heads of mineral de
elopment and power for the west,"
said Ickes. "would do something to
put individuals and small companies
Into action for the war and for a
few years afterward. While that would
be something definite toward winning
the war, it would not be any great
underpinning for the postwar situation
to the west."
-<S>
Six Montana Banks
Are Among Thousand
Largest in Country
Six Montana banks have enough as
sets to be included in a list of the
thousand largest banks of the nation,
according to the American Banker.
The banks and their standings on
the list, based on deposits as reported
In statements Issued Dec. 31, 1941, fol
low:
Metals Bank & Trust Co., Butte, No.
431; First National bank, Butte, No.
824; First National bank. Great Falls,
No. 549; First National Bank & Trust
Go., Helena, No. 607; Union Bank &
Trust Co., Helena, No. 635, and Mld
nd National bank, Billings, No. 933.
Montana banks whose standings In
ie table improved during the year,
^suiting in their moving higher on
ie list, Included the Midland Nation
.L, which moved up from 967th to 933d;
Metals Bank & Trust Co., which moved
up from 441st to 431st; First National
at Great Falls, which moved up from
553d to 549th, and Union Bank & Trust
Co., which moved up from 660th to
636th place.
Although these were the only six
Montana banks with sufficient deposits
to be Included In the list of the first
thousand, this state is ahead of many
others In number of banks qualifying
*or Inclusion In the list.
Deposits of the Montana banks in
he list, as reported Dec. 31. 1941,
anged from $6,967,434 to $16,315,131.
Drive Carefully During 1042
-♦
Classified Advertisements
DO YOU NEED A NEW
SADDLE?
"H
i:
Or Does Your Old Saddle
Need Repairs?
Write for ratal«* and prices
Orlrinal CoggshaU Saddles
Miles Cltr Saddlery Cs.. Miles City, Mont.
is j
j
1
pro-_
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
; p^pe^. «^you^ ^ c
confectlonery puny equipped, «»-w, 1 ;
j ing quarters. Real bargain. Write box 1906-M
Great Fall». Montana. _ _
^ 8ALB __ Black B ear Hotel & cafe, mod-(
crn , ne wly furnished In county seat and
I payroll town. Will rent calV separately. Cash
or term. Mrs K E Fess.er. Thompson
For Sale
have »4000, In
for sale—io-room hotel & cafe in
pm™« »"d tourist town _a J*'" 0 ,"
people h 8ickne»s forces »ale. DeLuxe Hotel
Grand Cou"ee Wash.
Exclusive shoe store. good wyon^i
, r on* D 'i 0 w°ôvêrhîad d good "clean .t«k bkh
,... price p o Box inoa-o. Great Paiia.
Mont. ___
j )LD established, favorably known cafe in
' Great Falls. Montana; high type patronage. ;
#111 lease building and seU or lease flxtu/es
" reliable operator. Address P. Norby, Great
r J_
Än."bS!
! , 0 °'» Süp «wml i
^jmessEw! Ellis. Stewartvllle. Minn., Box
i
1
{
?alls, Montana.
jos.
I NEW AND U8ED FURNITURE store
; years established, doing good
« e 0 a r ^,, 8 E EVBnS 'I
n ° rtnctl Qret0 Bo]t US ' _ 1
bar . b .q business and equipment for sale. :
SO ml. from Duluth on HI. 61 The only.
"•* f ar ;P'® s0 ^ Ba r b q° carkon^Minn 0
m>ke J _!_:_|
i property OWNING YANK In Canada
wishes to contact property owning Canadian ;
( , wlth view to exchange. H, A.
(£ hlt 8 c£t Knife. |ask„ Canada. !
__I-!.
.8»v popuus: »;«« ho™ . 8»». ;
r ,^° om ;,,,, e v C fu P r '?" h e d »19 000 Write Box 105, !
! ^public w„r I
Republic, wasm- |
,.v. five'
business. ;
9 »° E e """VK d&i^oreteTaÄi
Shop. Bonners Ferry. Idaho,
. BhnD
b.^' D^hy' U Vwe?
H ariem, Montana.
—-- . ... .....
; eon sale—meat market in Missou a.
d buslness and location, easy terms. Bad
„eaith. Box me-w. Great Fails, Mont.
FARMS, RANCHES AND LANDS
WONDERFUL FARM LANDS ON THE COT
TON BELT RAILROAD. Rich farm land in
mild climate; 5 cuttings of alfalfa each sea
; big yields of corn, oats, cotton and soy- j
beans: line for livestock and poultry: wonder
ful truck garden country, close to big mar-1
kets; paved roads, schools, churches and good;
neighbors; farm labor reasonable; low prices;
according to cleared land and Improve-!
Cotton Belt railroad terri
■nn
ränge
ments; located In
tory. State requirements In reply. Address l
A. C. McKlbbln, Director of Development. St I
Louis Southwestern Railway Lines, 523 Cotton
Belt Bldg., St. Louts, Mo.
200-ACRE RANCH In Mason Valley. Nev. 180
acres cultivated, bal. pasture. Fully equipped]
dairy and milking parlor. 5-ton Ice plant. !
federal and state accredited: 75 cows. 4 ]
horses, tractor, hay baler, all necessary farm
machinery. 7-room modern home. Excellent
wholesale and retail dairy
Terms. For Information address. Yerlngton
Dairy. Box 351, Yerlngton. Nev.
IMPROVED DRY LAND PARMS-Three large
acreage, well Improved dry land farms, all
set up and ready for crop this year. Good
allotment base. Immediate possession. Prices
ranging from »12 to »17 50 per acre. The
rhos. A, Buscy Agency. Chester. Montana.
FOR SALE—12 acres Irrigated. 7-room mod
ern house, garage, barn, chicken house and
other buildings, or will sell 5 acres. *6 mile
from Poison, on highway. Mrs. Annie Meek,
Route No. 1. Poison, Mont.
FOR SALE OR TRADE tor large Montana
ranch. 2325 acres fine Improved land, raised
25.000 bushels corn, beans. »50 acre. Joins
„ ,,u .
Fairfield paving, Russell Smith. Atty., Fair
flcld, Iowa.
ARIZONA'S most valuable 5 acres. Rarest date
palms and citrus, 8 years old. Unexcelled lo
cation. fertility and climate. »3500. »2000 less
than cost. Harry Palmer. Wigwam Club.
Deckers, Colo.
FOR SALE—210-acre modern coast dairy
ranch, stocked and equipped. Large route,
processing plant, refrigeration. 2 homes. Write
Wm. C. Holtz, Box 2. Ilwaco. Wash.
FOR SALE: 1200-ACRE SHEEP RANCH. fuUy
equipped, good water right, well Improved.
Taylor grazing allotment for 1,000 sheep.
Terms. Write L. M. Pflffner, Lima, Montana.
NORTHWEST FLORIDA. "Food will win the
_ war and write the peace''—Secretary Wlck
ird. Raise food, chickens, eggs. hogs, cattle,
or a good garden. McCasklll Co-Lands,
Oe Funlak Springs, Fla.
1380-ACRE FARM and stock ranch, all fenced.
good water, on Woodie creek, near Jordan
Montana. New 7-room house. »2700 cash. Write
lohn W. Aldrich, Route 4. Snohomish, Wash.
840 ACRE DIVERSIFIED RANCH south Great
Falls. Good springs, buildings, easy terms.
Prary & Burlingame. Inc.. Great Palls. Mont.
MUST SELL FULLY EQUIPPED 58-acre
poultry farm. 36 acres In grain. A bargain.
B. A. Schudelske. Oakland. Oregon.
«1.800 CASH, »2.400 in trade. 320 acres. Ideal
for stock. 30 miles N. W. of Billings. Write
Box 1908-R. Great Falls. Montana.
NURSERY STOCK
FRUIT, nut. flowering, shade trees, roses.
berry plants, shrubs. Free 40-page catalog.
Tualatin Valley Nurseries. Sherwood. Oregon.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE: 1941 complete rural directory of
Valley county. Montana. Price 50c per copy
any place In the Ü. S. A list of 1,700 farmers
and ranchers. The Glasgow Courier, Glasgow,
Montana.
NOTHING LIKE IT. 250-year calendar from
1750-2000 only 25c. Dale Newell Co., 8. N.
Vermillion, Danville. Ill.
COMPOSITION (Roll) ROOFING, Poultry
netting, lawn fence, steel posts, cable, all
priced low. Alaska Junk Co., Spokane. Wash.
MUCH FRUIT IMPORTED
Montanans imported $256.837.72 of,
out-of-state fruits and vegetables dur
ing February, the state horticulture
division reported. The report showed
$80,368.95 worth of home-grown vege
tables were consumed in the state.
RIVERS BELOW NORMAL
Flow to all streams in the Columbia
river basin in western Montana dur
ing 1941 was below that of 1940 and
the 1930-1941 average. Prank Stermitsz,
United States geological engineer, re
ported.

Drive Carefully During 1942
PLANT FOOD AND FRUIT
FOR VICTORY
SEE OIK MANY FINE OFFERS
Write fer Big Free Vesrbask
STATE NURSERY AND SEED CO
Helena. Montana
j
j
key checks stamped with your name and ■
address, only 25c. w. E, Km*. Box «J
_ .
Beauty Culture Schools
1
j
SAVE 50%-75%—Used paru for aU cars
cahl wossman * co., 21« Fourth at
So., Great Palls. Monta -
SPECIAL SERVICES
Cove. Ark.
WE MAKE STAMPS, rubber, trpe. Helens
Stamp Works, Helena. Montana.
LEWIS * WALKER, assayers. chemists. 10«
N. Wyoming. Butte. Montana.
„ . TTT v /"'ITT TTTDP
BJliAU 1 I tULl UKt
Classes starting Immediately
; PCPgtT induction
I^ÏÏpSImeht
^m^Iz^oLl 1 'beaoty°8CHC»l*'
McCAimoLi^BatOTY ^bch^h.
. . ..
Tu^or 3 sp"e'°u£e S"" 0 "
each town In Montana. Good coramlaalons.
40 publications. Write International Clrcula
tion Company. 1007 Fourth A Pike Bldg..
Seattle. Wash.
Help Wanted
FEMALE
MARRIED MAN, Irrigating and dairy farm
work, year Job. good wages to reliable man
NO smoking. Give reference and fuH par
Oculars. Bonny Brae Farm, White Bluffs,
permanent position open to two watch
makers, strictly watch rep a' rs .,!ï rll fL , st ®^
experience, general, or specialist railroad
watches. Address Anderson Jewelry Co., R. R.
Watch Inspectors, Ogden, Utah.
.. „„ . „ . . . .. . „
" "".SIÂ"ÏS. P ""Æ
town In Montana. Good commissions. 40 pub
»cations. Write International Circulation
Company. 1007 Fourth & Pike Bldg.. Seattle,
-
MALE
" j

Personal
YOU CAN BE HAPPY, Find a companion or
lllemate Free membership to ladies 18-35.
Send stamp for sealed details. Genay Jarvys
P. O. Box 56, Seattle. Wash.
MARRY RICH: Free particulars, photos, de
scriptions. sealed. Lois Reeder, Box 649,
Palestine, Texas.
Simpson, Box 1251. Denver, Colorado.
__ ---_ . .—
HANDICRAFT- CROCHETERA, etc, High-Class
plan—All honest "cash outlets. 25c brings
information. Box 208. Buchanan, N. Y.
_______ ___,
SPIRITD AL— Three questions answered.
Rev. Sarah Bogle. R. D. 2, Dubois. Pa.
GET ACQUAINTED CLUB. Introductions
made quickly. All ages, many wealthy.
25c.
3alesmen-Agents
SELL WOOLENS. Old established woolen
firm wants ambitious salesmen to canvass
rural and town trade. Liberal commissions
offered. Write Star Woolen Company. Fergus
Falls. Minn.
,
Wanted to Buy
j ~ 1,-T'RC vvnnl
|
McMILLAN FUR & WOOL, INC., Minneapolis
Ship furs, wool, hides, horsehair—Highest
prices.
i
MISCELLANEOUS_
ne" OR used" AUTOMATIC ENGINE driven
A. O. power plant, 10,000 watt or larger.
E. P. Reese, Box 921. Salmon. Idaho.
HORSE HAIR
I
j
|
HORSE HAIR WANTED. Ship direct to man
. 'ufacturef. Highest prices paid. Purchases
, rom onp pounri t0 one ton write for Infor
motion. Louis S. Ziff, 412 Colyton 8t„ Los
Angeles. Calif.
Classified
Livestock
Advertising
For Sale
CALVES
TILLAMOOK CALVES carefully selected from
the famous high producing Tillamook dairy
herds. Disney, the-Calf Man. Tillamook. Ore.
Wanted to Buy
CATTLE
WANTED—STEERS OR HEIFERS com In*
yearlings, wire or call Fred Lewis. Brownln*,
Montana.
Fewer Varieties
And Higher Prices
Of Liquor Foreseen
Montanans who enjoy their drinks
are going to have fewer varieties to
choose from and will have to pay more
for them. Montana liquor board at
taches say.
The number of varieties of whisky
offered by distillers, they state, have
been reduced as result of war demand
for industrial alcohol for explosives
and other purposes, while the demand
for cheaper grades of liquor has mul
tiplied because of recent tax Increases,
making it more difficult to obtain sup
plies.
Additionally, It was reported, the
state liquor monopoly is having diffi
culty getting nun, and one manufac
turer furnished only 10 cases of an
ordered 100.
Scotch whisky also Is becoming dif
ficult to get, liquor board officials said,
due to submarine activities in the At
lantic.
CHEESE AND CORNFLAKE
SANDWICH
Spread slices of white bread with
cream cheese. Lay on a libera] layer of
cornflakes and cover with buttered
slice of white bread.
BONNER WAGING
SLOT MACHINE'
WAR IN STATE
ATTORNEY GENERAL APPEALS TO
LOCAL AUTHORITIES FOR
QUICK ACTION
Slot machine operators attempting
to bring "one-armed bandits' into
Montana under the pretext of aiding
nation's war effort prompted an
appeal by Attorney General John W.
Bonner for quick action by local law
en forcement officers.
In letters to all county attorneys
and sheriffs, the attorney general
asked immediate investigations and
seizure of any machines found.
"Because the United States govern
inent is imposing a tax on slot ma
chines, I am informed that syndicates
and operators are now attempting to
place slot machines In Illegal operation!
111 Montana under the pretext they
are legal and beneficial to our war
effort. I
"Such statements are, of course,
false and misleading. Two-fisted men ;
—not 'one-armed bandits'—are needed 1
now," the attorney general said.
j
After calling attention to drastic |
penaltles provided by Montana law for
possession of slot machines, Bonner
continued: 1
"The payment of a tax to the United |
States government does not change our i
low or make the illegal possession or
illegal operations of slot machines
legal in Montana. j
"I understand that the government ;
has prohibited the manufacture of slot
machines in order to transfer the ma- 1
terials to war production. I am fur- j
ther advised that In many states pub- i
lie officials, regardless of the gam
bling laws, have carried on extensive
campaigns to seize slot machines and
pin ball machines with the view of
using some of the materials of which
they are constructed for war purposes.
"It appears now more than ever be
fore that all public officials should
work together to enforce our laws and
that those who are seeking to evade
these laws should devote their ener
gies to gainful war efforts."
Bonner added that in his opinion
there is less gambling in Montana now
than at any time in the state's history,
largely because of a law-enforcement
campaign Initiated by the attorney
general in co-operation with county
attorneys more than a year ago, a
campaign he said Would be vigorously
continued.
-<«>
Foresters to Mark
Ancient Indian Trail
An ancient trail near Missoula used
by the Indians of western Montana
before the coming of the white man
will soon be marked by foresters to
preserve it for posterity.
The trail winds across the lower
slopes of Mount Sentinel and Uni
versity mountain, through Pattee can
yon and down Deer creek, near Mill
town, and was used during high water
seasons.
Indians, traveling westbound along
the south bank of the river, would be
unable to ford the river and continue
through Hell Gate canyon, which was
the route when the water of the river
Classified
POULTRY
Advertising
Wanted to Buy
PO U LT RY
NYSTRAND POULTRY CO., cash buyers of
live poultry and eggs. Ship any time. 2139
Placer St., Butte, Mont.
For Sale
BABY CHICKS
P 2 Ä 3253
BETTER QUALITY CHICKS from the
of certified high record Rocks of the North
west. Write for Gallatin Chick News.
Gallatin Chick Hatchery, Bozeman. Montana.
cream
$2.50 PER 100
POSTAGE PAID
for day old White Leghorn cock
erels from large hens. Make
splendid low cost fryers. Hens
tested as required by Montana
Livestock Sanitary Board. Send
money In full with order. Prompt
shipment guaranteed.
FRED H. COCK ELL, MUwaokle, Ore,
u
BUBR'8 HUSKY CHICKS O. O. D., blood
tested, 100% live delivery Leghorns. 19.90;
Reds. Rocks, Orplntons. >10.40; N. H. Reds.
Otants. »11.40; Heavy Assorted. »8.90: Sur
plus Mixed. »8.90. Burr Chick Company. Lew
1stown, Montana.
HAGEN'S WHITE LEGHORN CHICKS. U. 8.
approved, pullomra tested. Pedigree sired,
straight egg line breeding. Straight run 100,
»12 80: pullets »26.00: cockerels »2 50, Pre
paid. Hagen Hatchery, Parkersburg, Iowa.
u 8. APPROVED U. S Tested Chicks. 9
breed* and hybrids. All White Leghorns
R O. P. sired. Order now. Chicks that will
live. Sexed or straight run. Dawson Hatchery.
Dawson, Minn.
BAVE MONEY by ordering chicks now. Prom
North Dakota U. 8. Approved and Pullorum
tested flocks. Broad breasted turkey poults
and ducklings. Write for prices and catalog.
Tauger's Hatchery, Bismarck. N. D.
large TYPE WHITE LEGHORN cockerel
chicks at »2.00 per 100, f. o. b. Winthrop,
Minn. Winthrop Ideal Hatchery, Winthrop,
Minn.
BABY CHICKS— U. 8. Approved-Pullorum
Tested. Leading egg strains. Reasonable
prices. Catalog free. Farmers Union Supply,
WUllston. North Dakota.
DAY-OLD PULLETS, males and
SEXEIJ
straight run chick*. Bloodtested. Big Dls
low prices, high quality. Inman
count*.
Hatcherlea. Aberdeen. South Dakota
CHICKS H. Dak. Oldest Hatchery. Ü. 8. Ap
proved. Pullorum Tested. Located close
Montana line. Severson Hatchery, Stanley.
N. Dak
drakes
SELECTED WHITE PEKIN DRAKBS >2.06.
L, I. Heaton, McKenzie. North. Dakota.
M. N. A MARCH M. IMS U)
SCHOOL DISTRICT
CONSOLIDATIONS
DUE IN MONTANA
BETWEEN 5» AND 180 FEWER IN
STATE NEXT YEAR, SAYS
FRED BENNION
Secretary Fred Bennlon of the Mon
tana Taxpayers association has estl
mated there would be between 50 and
100 fewer school districts in Montana
next year than at present.
Bennlon said he had definite Infor
matlon of 45 districts which would be
abandoned or consolidated with others,
11 of them In Toole county and 6 in
! Teton county. '
| "Lack of sufficient taxable valuation
and resultant inability to finance op
eratlon of schools has been a principal
factor in forcing abandonments," Ben
nlon said.
Montana has about 1,900 school dis
trlcts, of which 219 have a taxable
value of less than $20,000 each. Two
hundred and 29 districts have taxable
valuations between $20,000 and $30 000
and 414 are in the $30,000 to $50,000
bracket,
Last year there were 346 schools op
crated in the state with five pupils
or less; 605 schools had but 6 to 10
students, Bennlon said, "making per
pupil costs and taxes extremely high"!
Bennlon explained that county sup
erintendents may abandon a school
district when no school is held for two
consecutive years and must abandon a
district when school is not conducted !
for three consecutive years. |
He declared 200 school districts In
Montana take advantage of a loophole I
In the law by operating every third
year. ■ j
"Rubber shortages may slo» up the !
trend toward consolidation that Im- 1
encouraged," BenS,""S
_ ..
Lack of tires may even cause some
consolidated districts to be broken up
or result in the operation of more
than one central school."
He said a movement was on foot
to break up district 28 in Lake county,!
largest consolidated district in the|
î
!
|
j
j
I
j
I
!
r . ...
r ^ ld it P Iark County Attorney
J. Miller Smith announced that John
Mosney had been released from eus
tody and returned to Spokane, where
he was arrested Feb. 22 by Deputy
Sheriff Rolla Duncan and brought to
Helena. He was held while an investi
gation was conducted into a killing
34 years ago.
state.
KILLER OF NEGRO
GIVEN FREEDOM
JOHN MOSNEY FREED FOLLOW
ING INVESTIGATION INTO
34-YEAR-OLD CASE
.
Smith commended Deputy Duncan
highly for his efforts to solve a mur
der mystery of long standing.
Mosney had been sought since Oct.
15, 1907, for the slaying of Robert
Holmes, negro prospector, at Holmes',
cabin southeast of Wolf Creek. Mos- !
ney claimed Holmes shot at him twice,
wounding him in the head and was
in the act of drawing again when the
fata] shot was fired. His statement,
Smith pointed out, did not constitute
a confession of murder but rather a
denial of guilt under the defenses of
criminal law.
There were no eye-witnesses to the
shooting, the county attorney said, and
no living persons, so far as known,
can throw any further light on the
tragedy. The investigation made by
the county attorney's office extended
as far as Los Angeles, and all persons
in this state who were believed to
have had any knowledge of the shoot
ing were interviewed, Smith said.
<$>
33 Montana Counties
Split $81,679 Fund
F or School Support
Thirty-three of Montana's 56 coun
ties shared in distribution of the
$81,679.50 common school equalization
fund this year, Miss Elizabeth Ireland,
superintendent of public Instruction,
has announced.
The fund, she explained, was in
tended to permit operation of schools
in counties which were not able to
raise the necessary money despite
maximum tax levies.
Distribution of the fund by counties
was:
Blaine, $2,579 ; Carbon, $183.27: Car
ter, $5.256,12; Cascade, $3,069.99; Chou
teau, $638.09; Daniels, $386.03; Dawson,
$6.941.48; Fallon, $426.27; Fergus. $2,
408.17; Flathead, $3,125.28; Garfield,
$2,070.73; Golden Valley, $116.34; Gran
ite, $284; Hill, $820.79; Lake, $1,856.90;
Lewis and Clark, $850.55.
McCone, $3,169.77; Missoula, $544.26;
Musselshell, $990.84; Park, $895; Pe
troleum, $339.52; Phillips, $5,997.96;
Powder River, $2,148.4«; Ravalli, $2,
125.20; Richland. $15,734.26; Sheridan,
$789.02; Stillwater, $7,247.49; Sweet
Grass. $207.59; Teton, $1,376.63; Toole,
$329.89; Valley. $3,644.07; Wibaux. $1,
283.26; Yellbwstone, $1,833.56.
ONE-EYE SANDWICH
Spread rounds of bread with a mix
ture of cream cheese and chopped nuts
and cover with another slice of bread
cut with a doughnut cutter. In the
opening place a bit of firm Jelly.
gpHMMHnMHMHMUHHJHHHpjmH
Tanks and Destroyers
From YOUR life insurance! Since the war started in 1939
American life companies' investments in government bonds
would provide 7200 pursuit planes or 13,000 medium tanks or
160 destroyers or 12,500,000 garand rifles.
WESTERN LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY
I
■ 1
HELENA
K. B. RICHARDSON, President
MONTANA
/MIDDLE-AGE^
vfumc.ni \jt$.ow/
HEED THIS AD VI CE ! 1
IT you're croa*. rastleag. suffer hot
flashes, nervous feelings,
distress of "Irregularities"—caused
by this period in a woman's life—try
Lydia E. Pint ham 's Vegetable Com
pound at once!
Plnkham's Compound Is made
especially for women, and famous
to help relieve distress due to this
female functional disturbance.
Thousands upon thousands of
women have reported
benefits. Follow label
WORTH TRYING!
lions.
U. S. SPENDING
HITS NEW PEAK
With 3} months yet to go, federal
expenditures for the current fiscal
year surpassed the heaviest spending
In any full year in American history.
The treasury disclosed that between
July 1, 1941, and March 17, 1942, it
spent $18.667,611,678. The highest
amount spent in a previous full fiscal
year was $18,522,895,000 in 1919, which
included the close of the World war.
The new record was due almost en
tlrely to the war program, which has
alre ady cost $13,989,189,975.
According to budget estimates, total
expenditures in the remainder of the
fiscal year—through June 30—are
slated 10 add about $12.000.000,000, of
whlch $10,000,000,000 will be for war.
The new «Pending record was
achieved in the midst of the greatest
tocome tax collection in history. In
016 first 17 da ys of March, Income
*** collections officially recorded to
taled $1,391,371,310, or more than
"SSSPSL*** to
!tt mnoh »Sn
&SSi
figures for several days.
«i , rr y, » » »
IS tttt C JH CIS UOUulCu
g-, .
L OtlSCTVCltlOtl A T€(IS,
U
0~OmiflulOT J\V€T8
Montana fanners and ranchers more
than doubled the area in soil conser
vation districts in the state during
the calendar year 1941, and the area
Included In grass conservation districts
co-operating with the soil conserva
tion service was almost doubled, it is
reported by T. C. Anderson of Boze
man, state co-ordinator for the soil
conservation service.
The growth in the area in soil con
servation districts, he said,
through the organization of three new
districts aggregating 933,006 acres and
the addition of 987,800 acres to the
reserve soil conservation district in
Sheridan county, which had been
ganized previously
There were eight soil conservation
districts aggregating 3,182,364 acres as
of Dec. 31, 1941, Anderson concluded,
and eight grass conservation districts
which Include 2,900,612 acres were also
co-operating with the soil conservation
service.
; ami
er
Increased taxes Jumped cigaret
prices in Shanghai 50 percent in
a
_ ' _
All that its
name implies
K'
*>'o
•u
*1;
Sa
f Bourbon
-7?
W i
fOv* fUK out
$130 $045
JLnin ^puai
Code No. TOC
Code No. 79E
[w
Hiram Walker & Sons Inc.,
Peoria, III. 90 proof.

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