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Montana oil and mining journal. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1931-1953, October 03, 1942, Image 2

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ROCKY MOUNTAIN
POSTED PRICES
FOR CRUDE OIL
Following are the current prices for
crude oil per barrel as posted by the
principal purchasers in various fields
of the Rocky Mountain Division with
the effective date of the price, by
states and fields:
MONTANA
Field—Effective Dale
Cut Bank:
Texas, 3-30-42 .
Producers 3-30-42 .
Northwest, 7-1-41 .
Home Oil, 7-1-41 .
Idaho Ref. Co., 7-1-41
Yale OU Corp., 7-1-41
Cat Creek, 4-1-41 .
Kevln-Sun burst;
Texas, 3-30-42 .
Producers, 3-30-42 ....
Big West, 3-30-42 .
Price
$ 1.20
1.20
1.10
1.10
1.08
1.05
1.15
1.00
1.00 !
.90 j
!
WYOMING
Salt Creek, effective 7 a. m..
May 20, 1941
Below 29 degrees
29 to 29.9 .
30 to 30,9 .
31 to 31.9 .
32 to 32.9 .
33 to 33.9 .
$ 96
.98
1.00
1.02
1.04
1.06
34 to 34.9 .
36 to 359 .
86 to 36.9 .
37 to 37.9 .
88 to 38.9 .
39 to 399 .
40 degrees and above
Cole Creek, LaBarge, Midway Dome,
Dutton Creek, Iron Creek, Lost Soldier,
and Teapot fields in Wyoming, and the
Moffat field In Colorado, crude oil
prices follow the Salt Creek posting.
The East Mahoney crude price is based
10c below the Salt Creek posting, and
the Wertz and Mahoney prices are
1.08
1.10
1.12
1.14
1.16
1.18
190
HAVRE— E. V. Ahern, local attorney
has secured a position in Philadelphia
with the securities and exchange com
mission in the legal department of
the public utilities division. Ahem
came to Havre in 1926 from Helena,
where he was law clerk and marshal
for the state supreme court. He was
city attorney here for two years, 1928
and 1929, and was county attorney
from 1931 to 1934, serving two term, j
He also served in the last legislature, j
representing Hill county, and was re- !
, , TT , ,
former owner of the Holliday Fuml
ture company, died at his home here !
recently. !
j
j
I
nominated in the primaries in July.
-*>
BILLINGS — Fred P. Holliday, 69,
Order Today!
!
A SOURCE BOOK
—m—
GEOLOGY
By K. P. Mather, Profeasor of Geol
ogy, Harvard University, and S. L.
Mason, Geologist.
702 PAGES—ILLUSTRATED
$5.00
This book gives a comprehensive
view of the development of geolog
ical science during the past four
centuries in the language of the
men who have molded geological
thought, and with the original
statements of many important prin
ciples and theories.
This is the only book in English
giving convenient access to these
carefully selected writings In their
original form.
Montana Oil &
Mining Journal
SUPPLY DEPARTMENT
Great Falls, Montana
If it's TEXACO
THEN YOU KNOW IT'S A RELIABLE PRODUCT
OF HIGH GRADE UNIFORM QUALITY
TEXACO PETROLEUM PRODUCTS
Insulated Texaco
Motor Oils
Insulated Havoline
Motor Oils
Engine Oils
Signal Oils
Dynamo Oils
Machine Oils
Cylinder Oils
Cylinder Stocks
Car Oils
Greases
Cup Greases
Gear Greases
Gear Lubricants
Axle Grease
Wire Rope
Lubricant 1
Pale Oils
Black Oils
Red Oils
Floor Oils
Waxes
Asphalts
Road Oils
Asphalt Cement
Pipe Coating
Roofing
Roofing Paper
Roofing Cement
A
LEADER
IN EVERY
FIELD
Fire-Chief
Gasoline
Sky-Chief
Gasoline
Kerosene
Fuel Oils
Bunker Oils
Diesel Oils
Miners' Oils
Gas Oils
Distillates
Spindle Oils
THE TEXAS COMPANY
SUNBURST, MONTANA
Producers of Gasoline from
Montana Crude Exclusively
Offices in All Principal Cities
[ based 20c below the Salt Creek posting.
LaBarge follows Mldconllnent prices
I <5c above Salt Creek). It is derived
I from the average of the prices posted
by Standard Oil and Texas In Mid
j continent. Since Standard post? down
I to 21 gravity and Texas stops at be
j low 29, the average prices apply to
I LaBarge crude below 28 gravity.
Medicine Bow, effective 7 a. m.,
May 20, 1941
Gravity after
Stabilization
55 to 55.9 .
56 to 56.9 .
57 to 57.9 .
58 to 58.9 .
59 to 59.9 .
60 degrees and above
11.43
1.45
1.46
1.47
1.48
1.50
Quealy Dome, effective 7 a. m..
May 20. 1941
27 to 27.9
28 to 28.9
29 to 29.9
30 to 30.9
31 to 31.9
32 to 32.9
33 to 33.9
34 to 34.9
35 to 35.9
$ .99
1.00
1.01
1.02
1.03
1.04
1.05
1.07
1.08
Field—Effective Date
Badger Basin, 5-20-41 .
Big Muddy. 5-30-41 ....
Black Mountain, 5-20-41
(5c below Hamilton Dome posting)
Byron, 1-30-37 ...
Cole
$ 1.10
1.08
.40
55
Follows Salt Creek (gravity range,
33 to 37) 1.06 to 1.14
Dallas. 7-31-42—OP A
Derby, 7-31-42—OPA
1.12
.45
.40
East Mahoney, 5-20-41
(10c below Salt Creek posting)
Elk Basin, 5-20-41 .
Prannle:
Light, 5-20-41 .
Heavy. 5-20-41 .
Garland, 6-1-41 .
Hamilton Dome, 5-20-41
Hidden Dome. 6-15-41 .
Iron Creek, 5-20-41 ....
(Follows Salt Creek posting)
Lance Creek, 7-1-41 .
Lander:
X XX
1.00
.70
.47
.45
.45
1.40
... X.XX
Lost Soldier, 5-20-41
Mahoney. 5-20-41 .
Maverick Springs ..
Indian, 8-1-41 .
Kirk, 7-7-41 .
Riverton, 11-1-40 ..
Oregon Basin, 6-1-41 .
Poison Spider, 7-1-41 .
Bock creek, 5-20-41 .
South Casper Creek, 7-1-41
Teapot (outside reserve) 5-20-41. .x.xx
(Follows Salt Creek posting)
Salt Creek Tensleep, 5-20-41 .6785
Wertz, 5-20-41
(20c below Salt Creek posting)
1.12
Hudson, 7-31-42—OPA
Woodson, 6-19-41
.60
.721
XXX
(Follows Salt Creek posting)
(Tensleep 20c under)
XXX
(20c below Salt Creek posting)
.511
95
95
95
.50
93
1.15
.50
US
COLORADO
Port Collins and Wellington,
effective 7 a. m., May 21, 1041
Below 29 degrees .
29 to 29.9 .
30 to 309 .
31 to 319 .
32 to 32.9 .
33 to 339 .
34 to 34.9 .
35 to 359 .
36 to 369 .
37 to 379 .
38 to 38.9 .
39 to 399 .
40 degrees and above .
Wilson Creek,
$ 96
98
190
192
1.04
1.06
1.08
U0
1.19
1.14
1.18
1.18
190
effective May 20, 1941
Below 29 degrees ...
29 to 299 .
30 to 309 .
31 to 319 .
32 to 329 .
33 to 339 .
34 to 349 .
35 to 359 .
36 to 36.9 .
37 to 37.9 .
38 to 389 .
39 to 399 ..
40 degrees and above
Field—Effective Date
Rangely, 5-20-41 ...
(10c below Midcontinent 40—and—
above price)
Cannon City, 9-1-41
Florence, 9-1-41 ...
$ 96
.98
1.00
1.02
1.04
1.06
1.08
1.10
1.12
1.14
1.16
1.18
190
1.15
1.05
1.06
Treasure State News Briefs
HELENA—Mrs. Emma Brown, 71, a
resident of Helena for the last 49 years
died at St. John's hospital. Mrs. Brown
was bora in Sweden, and came to this
country when she was 14 years old
MISSOULA — The forest service's
parachute-jumping fire-fighting bat
talion has been disbanded for the sea
son. The squadron of 40 men, battled
numerous blazes caused by lightning
—"
Helena — Montana's unemployment
compensation trust fund totaled $7 -
188,621.44 on Aug. 31. State Auditor
John J. Holmes reported. This was
the largest balance in the fund since
it was established in 1937
____
CÜT BANK The largest poultry
farm in this section of the state and
one of the largest in Montana, the
Sinclair Harris hatcheries, near :
Browmng, was almost totally destroyed
by fire.
BUTTE—Rev. Leonard Thompson of
Dillon was elected president of the in
termountain circuit of international
Lutheran churches at the closing ses
sions of the circuit's convention here.
Missoula was selected site of the 1943
conclave.
HELENA — Democratic party lead
ers have opened headquarters for the
1942 campaign in Helena,
quarters are in the Placer hotel under
direction of State Chairman Arthur
Head
_ _ , „„„ . ,
P. Lamey of Billings assisted by J. E.
Hilgard of Great Palls, state secretary.
HELENA—An all-time record is be
lieved to have been set in August as a
result of only 20 of the 396 deaths in
Montana being chargeable to com
municable diseases. The stork main
tained a considerable advantage over
the grim reaper during the month,
1,025 births being recorded.
GREAT FALLS—Officers of the
newly organized Parents and Wives of
Service Men club were elected at a
meeting In the Veterans' hall. Harry
Trodick was chosen president, Guy
Palagi, vice president; Mrs. Clyde
Cabbage, secretary, and Mrs. Mark
Cummings, treasurer.
__ _ _ „
DILLON— Miss Ottilie Brauer, a
member of the DiUon training school
faculty was named president of the
Beaverhead local of The Montana
Education association. Other officers
elected Include D. L. Johnson, vice
president, and Mrs. Octavla Graves.
secretary.
MISSOULA — Work of completing
the central Montana highway link be
tween Great Palls and Missoula must
await the war's end, public road ad
ministration engineers reported. Sev
eral sections of the highway remain
to be completed.
HELENA—Donald E. Warner, di
rector of the state board of health
food and drug division since 1937, has
resigned to become an assistant In
spector with the federal food and drug
administration at San Francisco. War-.
ner has been succeeded by Elton M.
Andrew, assistant chief of the food
and drug division for two years.
HARLOWTON — Wheatland post,
American Legion, at its first fall meet
ing, voted to turn In the German ma
chine gun lovated in Wheatland park
for salvage. The gun, a World war 1
trophy, was awarded to the post by the
war department in 1919 and was
mounted in Its
the "Y" road with much ceremony.
HELENA—The Montana liquor con
trol board has "frozen' state liquor
stores in present locations for the dur
ation. Chairman A. E. McPatridge
said the step was taken because of a
shortage of labor and materials needed
when stores are moved. He said ap
plications for moving seven stores
were on file with the board.
CHOTEAU—Merger of the Choteau
Acantha and the Teton Citizen, local
weekly papers, was announced by Mil
lard Bullerdlck, publisher of the
Citizen. The Acantha for the last four
years has been published by Carl
Bishop, who expects to enter the army
soon. Bullerdlck formerly published
the Madison County Forum at Sheri
dan.
HELENA—A. T. Peterson, state
director of the office of price admin
istration, announced Montana retail
ers may now price all heavy and med
ium winter underwear under maxi
mum price regulation No. 210. Peterson
said this means retailers will be al
lowed approximately the same mark
up they had during the last six
months of 1941.
Natural Gas
Service
EFFICIENT!
ECONOMICAL!
DEPENDABLE!
Our company is furnishing this splendid
fuel to 50 communities in four northwest
ern states through more than 1,000 miles of
high-pressure pipeline.
Montana-Dakota Utilities Co.
Great Falls, Montana
ANACONDA—Captain Lawrence J.
Campbell, former Anacondan, has
written his parents. Mr. and Mrs.
James Campbell that he has arrived in
the Middle East. He is in charge of
supplies for a medical regiment. Mr.
and Mrs. Campbell have two other
. .. ... .. _
sons 111 AUa °^ c wa * They
are James Campbell, stationed with an
, ^
al . r . c 2?* and Campbell,
with the engineers.
ready OTgftnized a number of Mon
tana communities in an effort to save
HELENA—Car-sharing plans are al
nutomoblles and tlres - according to
Edwin Grafton, state director of war
transportation. Workers in plants em
ploying more than 100 men, who ride
five workers to a car and alternate use
of cars, are eligible to obtain second
grade tires under the national ratlon
ing program
LIVINOSTON—Mrs. Chester Beiden,
wife of the manager of the Livingston
division of the Montana Power com
pany, died here after a brief illness.
Mrs, Beiden was bom in Pawnee City,
Neb. She was graduated from the
University of Nebraska in 1907 and
was married to Mr. Beiden in 1909.
They moved to Lewis town in 1910 and
went to Roundup in 1920, where he
was Montana Power company man
ager. They came to Livingston in 1937.
, HELENA—Renters who continue oc
cupancy without paying rentals are
| liable not only for trebled damages but
for trebled rental as well, the Mon
tana supreme court ruled In the case
of George L. Steinbrenner against
C. G. and Grace Love, appealed from
Lake county, the court held that the
defendants were liable for damages
and nonpayment of rental. It was the
first time the court had ruled on the
statute involved. Chief Justice Howard
A. Johnson said,
CHOTEAU—John L. Weaver, 80,
long time resident and tavern opera
tor> died here. Weaver was bom at
Rochester, N. Y., and came to Mon
^ when 19 . locating at Augusta.
jj e was engaged in ranching at
August a with a brother. Ostrum, for
several years. In 1908, Weaver settled
choteau and for eight years oper
a ted the Beaupre hotel and cafe. He
subsequently operated a tavern and
was one of the builders of the Weaver
& Crossen business block.
BILLINGS — Teaching posit ions
have been found during the past year
for 229 graduates of Eastern Montana
normal here, Prof. L. R. Foote of the
school's appointment bureau reported.
HARLOWTON — Rupert Johnson of
Thief River Palls has assumed his
duties as cashier of the Continental
National bank here. He replaces B.
Murrel Kratzer, who resigned to enter
the army.
COLUMBUS — Harold I. Sylten,
Trophies, some
GREAT PALLS
huge in size and profusely decorated,
have been uncovered in the basement
of the courthouse and will be added to
the salvaged drive use. The trophies
were awarded the county or other
agencies at fairs and in contests. For
years they have been forgotten and re
garded merely as debris. The county
commissioners said the county salvage
committee had been advised it could
have them.
editor of the Columbus Weekly News
since 1931, has enlisted in the Marine
corps and will be assigned to recruit
ing duty in the Montana district.
MALTA—George Dur ocher was re
elected president of the Phillips
County Farmers Union at the annual
convention held at Dodson. L. W.
Frye was elected vice president and
Mrs. Joe Arnold was re-elected sec
retary-treasurer.
KALISPELL—Rev. L. M. Dranell,,
pastor of the Kalispell Baptist church
for the past five years has resigned
to become pastor of a Seattle church.
He has been president of the Kalispell
Ministerial association for the past
two years.
WOLF POINT—The badly mangled
body of Thomas H. Lunde, 36, section
hand from Tagus, N. D., was found
eight miles east of Wolf Point. It ap
peared he was riding a westbound
freight train and fell off, the train
running over him.
BUTTE—Lieut. Col. John P. Nelson,
commanding officer of the army dis
trict recruiting and induction station
for Montana, has been transferred to
a service command at Port Lewis,
Wash. He was succeeded by MaJ.
Joseph L. Lambert.
GREAT FALLS — The Great Palls
Ministerial association elected Rev.
Paul W. Dl er berger its president for
the next year. Other officers elected
were Cecil P. Ristow, vice president,
and Ros» J. Allen, secretary-treasurer.
Dlerberger succeeds Bruce E. Mills.
LIVINGSTON — Woodrow Wilson—
no kin to the nation's World war 1
president—has joined the marines.
He is the fourth son of Mrs. Minnie
Johnston of Livingston to enter the
armed forces, his three other brothers
being in the army.
HELENA
man Dan Maddox launched the 1942
campaign with the official opening of
state headquarters here. Assisting in
his office are Mrs. Bertha E. Dodds
of Helena, vice chairman, and Ashton
Jones, Broad us publisher, secretary.
GREAT FALLS — Clarence Maurer,
23, of Eden, died in a hospital here as
a result of Injuries suffered in an
automobile accident. Maurer, employ
ed as a truck driver at the municipal
airport, was fatally hurt when his car
tipped over while he was enroute to
work.
HELENA—Resignation of E. M. Blr
ley as state director of selective ser
vice and adjutant general of Montana
was announced recently. Btrley hopes
for active in the
Republican State Chair
soon
army. MaJ. S. H. Mitchell has been
named acting director of selective ser
vice but no successor to the post of
adjutant general has been named.
BILLINGS—Matt J. Kelly of Ana
conda was elected president of the
Montana Association of Insurance
Agents at the eleventh annual con
vention. H. O. Morgan of Glasgow was
elected vice president and Arnold
Huppert of Livingston was chosen
secretary-treasurer for his seventh
consecutive term.
HELENA—Joseph B. Eastman, di
rector of the office of defense trans
portation, has advised Governor Ford
his office has placed no restriction on
the use of railway passenger cars
which will prevent transportation of
farm labor to Montana from Califor
nia. Ford had appealed for lifting of
the "restrictions".
MISSOULA — Loraine Alquist of
Conrad, credited by the American Le
gion with being its youngest veteran
of World war 1, is about to enter the
armed forces again. While visiting
here, he reported his draft board had
classified hlm 1-A, subject to im
mediate induction. Alquist was 15
when he saw service in the A. E. P.
in Prance.
CHINOOK—Test plots of segmented
or single germ, sugar beet seed planted
near here are showing up well and
growers say the system may expedite
field work in the future. They said
the seed can be more evenly spaced so
the work can be done with less stoop
ing on the part of field hands and a
subsequent reduction in requirements
of labor at thinning time is forecast.
GLASGOW—The body of Robert W.
Heller, 26, was found hanging by a
necktie in the toilet room of a Pull
man on a Great Northern train.
Coroner J. A. Holland said he was
informed Heller, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Louis J. Heller, Hilbert, Wls., and
two other privates were enroute to
Port George Wright. Wash., from Fort ,
Sheridan, HI.
I—I I
Lubricants
Pioneers for 76 Years in
Correct Lubrication
The makers of Gargoyle Lubricants hare
sponsored "Correct Lubrication" for 76
years—proving that the right oil in the
right place used the right way saves money.
These principles are being used, success*
fully, by thousands of plants — many in
your own field. The results that they secure
every day — reduced power consumption,
more continuous production, decreased
maintenance and lower lubrication costs— •
through the aid of correct lubrication—are
important contributions to industrial
progress.
S0C0NY-VACUUM OIL CO., INC
WHITE EAGLE DIVISION
Mrat Notioed Btitik n|dj
Great Fails
r
KALISPELL—About ISO
expected to be stationed in a camp for
conscientious objectors established In
former CCC headquarters at Belton.
The men will work on prevention and
control of forest fires and improve
ments to roads. The camp, under
supervision of the national forest ser
vice, is sponsored by the American
friends service committee.
BUTTE—Staff Sgt. Boland L. Olkle,
22, a gunner in the army air corps
and a widely known Butte young man ,
is reported by the war department as
"missing in action" on Sept 5 in the
North Atlantic war tone. He was on
patrol duty at the time. Sergeant
Oikle was bom in Cut Bank but, until
his enlistment in the air corps last
Dec. 26, had resided in Butte since he
was 12 years old
CHINOOK — Henry Hofeldt, «3,
prominent woolgrower, who had lived
in this section for 50 years, died
cently.
Hofeldt was bom at Denison, la.,
and came to Chinook with his parents
in 1893. They settled on Peoples creek
in the Bear's Paw mountains. When
he grew to manhood Hofeldt home
steaded in the same neighborhood and
entered the sheep business. For years
he had been one of the largest opera
tors in the country.
men are
re
Send in a Contribution to the Badger.
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Practical
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By DORSEY HAGER
466 Pages, fully illustrated
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This is a guidebook of all-around
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The book gives you a clear discus
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chapter mi methods of prospecting
and mapping, occurrence and an
alyses of oil shale, etc.
SUPPLY DEPARTMENT
Montana Oil and
Mining Journal
Great Falls, Montana

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