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Montana oil and mining journal. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1931-1953, December 26, 1942, Image 2

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075103/1942-12-26/ed-1/seq-2/

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ROCKY MOUNTAIN
POSTED PRICES
FOR CRUDE OIL
Following are the current prices
crude oil per barrel as posted by the
principal purchasers In various fields
of the Rocky Mountain Division with
the effective date of the price,
states and fields:
$ 96
}
104
1 08
1.10
MONTANA
Field—Effective Date
Cut Bank;
Texas, 12-16-42 .
Producers 3-30-42 .
Northwest, 7-1-41
Home Oil, 7-1-41 .
Itfaho Ref. Co., 7-1-41
Yale Oil Corp., 7-1-41
Cat Creek, 4-1-41 .
Kevln-Sunburst:
Texas 12-16-42 .
Producers. 3-30-42
Big West. 12-16-42 ...
Price
150
1.20
120
1.10
1.08
1.05
M5
1 10
1.00
110
WYOMING
Salt Creek, effective 7 a. m.,
May 20, 1941
Below 29 degrees
29 to 29.9 .
30 to 30 9 .
31 to 31.9 .
82 to 32.9 .
98
1.00
83 to 33.9
1.06
34 to 34.9 .
85 to 35.9 .
36 to 36.9 .
37 to 37.9 .
88 to 38.9 .
39 to 39.9 ..
40 degrees and above
Cole Creek, LaBarge. Midway Dome,
Dutton Creek, Iron Creek, Lost Soldier,
and Teapot fields in Wyoming, and the
Moffat field in Colorado, crude oil
prices follow the Salt Creek posting.
The East Mahoney crude price is based
10c below the Salt Creek posting, and
the Wertz and Mahoney prices are
1.12
1.14
1.16
1.18
120
Mrs. Thomas Fredrick Travis, about
50, of Helena, was found dead In her
apartment recently. Her death resulted
from suffocation or burns she received,
Dr. W. F. Cashmore, county coroner,:
and chief of police Arthur C. Parsons
said.
Mrs. Travis' husband was killed Oct.
18. when struck by a hit-run driver on
the highway about four miles west of
Helena.
Helena Woman, 50,
Suffocation Victim
No closely related fossil ancestor of
the zebu, or Indian ox( ever has been
found.
■&
Make Every Pay Day Bond Day
Order Today!
A SOURCE BOOK
—In—
GEOLOGY
By K. P. Mather, Professor of Geol
ogy, Harvard University, and S. L
Mason, Geologist.
702 PAGES—ILLUSTRATED
$5.00
This book gives a comprehensive
view of the development of geolog
ical science during the past four
centuries in the language of the
men who have molded geological
thought, and with the original
statements of many Important prin
ciples and theories.
This Is the only book In English
giving convenient access to these
carefully selected writings in their
original form.
. Montana Oil &
Mining Journal
SUPPLY DEPARTMENT
Great Falls, Montana
If it's TEXACO
THEN YOU KNOW IT'S A RELIABLE PRODUCT
OF HIGH GRADE UNIFORM QUALITY
TEXACO PETROLEUM PRODUCTS
Insulated Texaco
Motor Oils
Insulated Havoline Red Oils
Motor Oils
Engine Oils
Signal Oils
Dynamo Oils
Machine Oils
Cylinder Oils
Cylinder Stocks
Car Oils
Greases
Cup Greases
Gear Greases
Gear Lubricants
Axle Grease
Wire Rope
Lubricant)
Pale Oils
Black Oils
A
LEADER
IN EVERY
FIELD
Floor Oils
Waxes
Asphalts
Road Oils
Asphalt Cement
Pipe Coating
Roofing
Roofing Paper
Roofing Cement
Fire-Chief
Gasoline
Sky-Chief
Gasoline
Kerosene
Fuel Oils
Bunker Oils
Diesel Oils
Miners' Oils
Gas Oils
Distillates
Spindle Oils
THE TEXAS COMPANY
SUNBURST, MONTANA
Producers of Gasoline from
Montana Crude Exclusively
Offices in AU Principal Cities
by Emerson Warden which bad been
1 based 20c below the Salt Creek posting,
! LaBarge follows Midcontinent prices
1 5c above Salt Creek). It is derived
from the average of the prices posted
by Standard Oil and Texas In Mid
continent. Since Standard posts down
to 21 gravity and Texas stops at be
i low 29, the average prices apply
LaBarge crude below 28 gravity,
by Gravity after
Field—Effective Date
Radier Ra.<;in s- 2 f)- 4 i ti in
if* uvSto 5-30-41 . 1 M
Rifrk Mountain 5-20-41 .2n
T c J , „
Rvron ° 20 ^ m W
Byron, 1-30-37 .55
Cole Creek. 5-20-41 . 1.12
!oo
70
. :«
.45
45
1-40
x.xx
60
72J
xjcx
I
*
xxx
(20c below Salt Creek posting)
Maverick Springs . 51 i
Indian 8-1-41 55 i
Kirk, 7-7-41 55 ;
Riverton, 11-1-40 . 35
Oregon Basin, 6-1-41 . 50 1
Poison Spider. 7-1-41 . 53 |
Medicine Bow, effective 7 a. m.,
May 20. 1941
Stabilization
55 to 55 9 .
i 56 to 56,9 .
57 to 57.9 .
58 to 58.9 .
59 to 59.9 .
60 degrees and above
$1.43
1.45
1.46
1.47
1.48
150
Quealy Dome, effective 7 a. m.,
May 20, 1941
: 27 to 27 9
28 to 28.9
29 to 29.9
30 to 30.9
31 to 31.9
32 to 32.9
33 to 33.9
34 to 34.9
35 to 35 9
( .99
1.00
151
1.02
1.03
1.04
1.05
1.07
1.08
I East Mahoney, 5-20-41
j aoc below Salt Creek pasting)
1 Elk Basin, 5-20-41 ...
Follows Salt Creek (gravity range,
33 to 37) 1.06 to 1.14
Dallas. 7-31-42—OP A
Derby, 7-31-42—OP A
.45
.40
x.xx
Prannie:
Light, 5-20-41 .
Heavy, 5-20-41 .
Garland. 6-1-41 .
Hamilton Dome. 5-20-41
Hidden Dome. 6-15-41
j Iron Creek, 5-20-41 ...
(Follows Salt Creek posting)
Lance Creek, 7-1-41 .
j Lander:
; Hudson, 7-31-42—OPA .
Woodson, 6-19-41 .
Lost Soldier, 5-20-41 .
j
Mahoney, 5-20-41
1.12
(Follows Salt Creek posting)
(Tensleep 20c under)
.
South Casper Creek, 7-1-41.50
Teapot (outside reserve) 6-20-41. .x.xx
(Follows Salt Creek posting)
Salt Creek Tensleep, 5-20-41 .....6785
Wer ^ 5-20-41 x.xx
(20c below Salt Creek posting)
COLORADO
Port Collins and Wellington,
effective 7 a. m., May 21, 1941
Below 29 degrees .
29 to 29.9 .
30 to 30.9 .
31 to 31.9 .
32 to 32.9 .
33 to 33.9 .
34 to 34.9 .
35 to 352 .
36 to 36.9 .
37 to 37.9 .
38 to 38.9 .
39 to 39.9 .
40 degrees and above .
Wilson Creek,
effective May 20, 1941
Below 29 degrees ...
29 to 29.9 .
30 to 30.9 ..
31 to 31.9 .
32 to 32.9 .
33 to 332 .
34 to 342 .
35 to 352 .
36 to 362 .
37 to 37.9 .
38 to 38.9 .
39 to 392 .
40 degrees and above
Field—Effective Date
Rangely, 5-20-41 ...
(10c below Midcontinent 40—and—
above price)
Cannon City, 9-1-41
Florence, 9-1-41 ....
$ 26
,98
1.00
1.02
1.04
1.06
1.08
1.10
1.12
1.14
1.16
1.18
120
$ 26
.98
1.00
1.02
1.04
1.06
1.08
L12
1.14
1.16 j
1.18 j
120
1.10
1.15
1.05
1.05
j
i
j
j
!
I
Treasure State News Briefs
to j
WWTWTJA U 7 w *
HELEN A — W. E. Fry, assistant
supervisor of the Helena national
J™.
pointed supervisor of the Cabinet
l Ä
Thompson FW!s. He succeeds Clay
ton S. Crocker.
GREAT PALLS — Hugo FagreUus,
district traffic superintendent for
Mountain States Telephone and Tele
graph Co. here for 13 years, has been
named state traffic supervisor for
company with headquarters In Helena
His family will remain here until
after the first of the year.
SHE! .BY—The Great Marlas fair
a thing of the past In Toole county
until after the war. The fair office
here, under the supervision of Gladys
I Dahl, has been ordered closed by toe
fair board and county commissioners.
It decided to take this course ai.
though the falr of 1942 wa£ the best
ev,r held from a fhmncW .fmdpolnt
HAMILTON — Ravalli county some
times goes far afield to elect Its office
holders. Last month the name of Mar
I ion Carruthers was Written in on sev
; eral ballots for public administrator.
There was no regular nominee. Now,
she has quahfied for the office and
posted bond. She is a law student at
MOM»-» Sff university lh Ml»««!..
BUTTE—A. E. Dye of Roundup was
re-elected president of the Montana
school Board association at the clos
ing 17th annual convention. Other of
ficers include E. H, Newell, Livingston,
first vice president, re-elected: P. J.
Jelinek, Miles City, second vice presl
dent; E. O. Lund, Wolf Creek, third
vice president; J. L. Gleason. Livings
ton, secretary-treasurer, re-elected,
GREAT FALLS — John Lloyd, 76,1
died suddenly at his home recently,
Lloyd had made his home In Great
paUs for 53 years and had been
prominent in civic and church affairs.;
He was a member of the First Con
gregational church. He retired from
business a number of years ago. He
was bora in Wales and came to this
coun try 56
BUTTE — Geoffrey Laveil of
Angeles, a native of Butte, has been
promoted from the rank of captain
that of major in toe harbor defense
organization of Narragansett bay, ac
cording to an army announcement re
ceived here from Port Adams, R.
Major Laveil was bom In Butte, May
9, 1917.
ago.
1 HEIEN A — Representatives of
Montana counties met here to form
the Fort William Henry Harrison
camp and hospital service council.
Mrs. George Poore of Helena
elected temporary chairman of
executive committee; Mrs. Howard
; Doggett of Townsend, treasurer,
j Charles Myers, Red Cross field
I rector for this area, secretary.
BUTTE—Word of the death of Felix
Hughes, oldtime former resident
Butte, in Los Angeles, has been
ceived by friends in this city. Bora
Eagle Harbor, Mich., Hughes came
Butte in his early youth, residing here
for more than 50 years. During the
majority of his residence In Butte
was employed as an engineer by the
Anaconda Copper Mining Co.
STOCKET T—Mrs. Eliza Jane Hol
man, 81, of Stockett, died at a Great
Falls hospital. Mrs. Holman was born
Dec. 1, 1861, In Halifax, N. S. In 1877
she was married to James Holman
Nova Scotia, and in 1888 the couple
came to Butte, where they lived fqr
two years. Prom Butte they moved
Sand Coulee and had made their home
there and in Stockett for the last 52
years.
LIBBY— E. M. Boyes was appointed
mayor to succeed Clay Parker, who
resigned to enlist in the navy. George
Wood, president of the council, had
been serving as acting mayor. BOyes
was an active member of the council
a number of years ago, having served
several terms. He was assistant chief
of the fire department for an extended
period up to the time he resigned a
few years ago.
HELENA—John M. Bruner, corres
pondent in charge of toe Montana
bureau of toe Associated Press, was
ordered to active duty in the army.
The nature of his assignment, other
than that as second lieutenant, was
not disclosed. Bruner, a native of
Cheyenne, Wyo., took charge of the
Montana bureau here April 12, 1937,
after service with the AP in Santa Fe,
N. M., Denver and Cheyenne.
CIRCLE
McCone County Sheriff
Natural Gas
Service
EFFICIENT!
ECONOMICAL!
DEPENDABLE!
Our company is furnishing this splendid
fuel to 50 communities in four northwest
ern states through more than 1,000 miles of
high-pressure pipeline.
Mootana-Dakota Utilities Co.
Great Falls, Montana
. r, _
Season reported George McCartney,
48. Cow Creek rancher, was Instantly
~ klUe ? whe ? 51104 ** *** during
an altercation at the McCartney home.
at A i coroners jury, returned a verdict
clearing Mrs. McCartney on
grounds It was a "justifiable homl
clde - Actin « Coroner Harmon was
c / lar ? e °* tbc Investigation, aided
„ sbertff County Attorney;
Hoover -
GREAT PALLS—Mrs Ann Burtosky
of' this city has been advised by the
I war department that her son, Arthur
Burtosky, has been listed as missing
while on a routine patrol flight with
the navy. Burtosky, who enlisted here
in April last year, was an aviation
radioman, third class He was a native
of Belt and attended grade and high
schools there. Before enlisting he was
employed by the Berger Meat Co.
Great Palls.
,, .
is , y 1T1Db , celebrated the 59th an
n " e ^sari r oi m ^£rlage at their
hora ® which
Hl*: y i?*' e v ^ ed 5? ntt £U < ? , ^ ly since ®*'
cha ^?l n ? Trlbble was 15001
I ^ L ° "5
i 081116 b ? ox 16810 to Ogden. Utah, and
i "J" 1 * hi i moth6r
j J*
; Frances Durham who came to this sec
j tion from Somerset. Ky.
__ .... ,
at * J?"?
! *"•***ST J 2 ? B * tui f been a
! Kautoan was bom
"
and the late Mrs. Pish, when an In
j fant. She attended schools in Helena
and was married there to Fred Kauf
| man of this city. They have lived in
| Great Palls since,
'
1 .. . ..... ~ „ „
67 :„ ^ °L toe I f te E ' I ^ ollar '
! SW" J hoIes8lei ; and »
! t 8 i 1 tT.,J] €re 32 y 6 ar f' died recently
at Billings. She had been in Laurel
visiting a daughter, Mrs. Walter
j Armstrong. Mrs. Nollar was bom in
j Flint, Mich. She had been active In
; Great Palls music circles, having
been a member of the Tuesday music
club for 11 years and of toe Methodist
church choir for 15 years. She was a
member of, the Eastern Star and a
former member of the D. A. R.
to
L
MANHATTAN—Mr. and Mrs. Dud
GREAT FALLS — Mrs. Bernice H.
Kaufman, wife of Fred Kaufman,
GREAT FALLS—Mrs. Myrtle Nollar
BUTTE—After nearly a year In the
six shell-splashed Pacific,
Stodden,
School of Mines in 1941, is now
California, studying to be a meteor
ologist in the air forces. Word of his
arrival in the United States was re
ceived recently by his parents, Mr.
and Mrs. R. J. Stodden of Butte. Their
son is a student at California Instl
tute of Technology in Pasadena. He
enlisted recently in the air force«
after passing a year as an engineer
in Honolulu.
Kenneth
a graduate of Montana
of
In
to
HELENA — Thomas E Mills, 73, a
Helena resident since 1889, widely
known In horticultural circles
throughout the country and founder
of the State Nursery & Seed Co., died
at St. Peter's hospital. Bora in Lon
don In 1869, he came to, America with
his parents when a young boy and,
settled In Hampton Roads, Va. He
later returned to London, where he
served his appretlceshlp In the Royal
Horticultural gardens and Kew gar
dens. Mills' father and grandfather
before him were widely known horti
culturists.
-«>■
Legislative Session
May Be Less Costly
The 1943 session of the legislature
may be one of the least costly In re
cent Montana history—unless the
legislators themselves get extravagant,
capitol officials said.
They pointed out that, while toe
usual session costs the state around
$200,000—the 1941 session cost $206,
000—the 1943 assembly will have 12
fewer members, saving the state the
$7,200 they would draw in salaries at
the rate of $10 a day for toe 60-day
session and some $300 to $400 in
mileage fees.
Additionally, a check of purchasing
department requisitions for supplies
for toe house and senate disclosed a
saving of several hundred dollars from
the cost two years ago. For the house,
the department ordered supplies cost
ing $1,04727 and for the senate, $809.45
worth.
-2
Read the Classified Advertisements
JONES SUGGESTS
STATE BUY LAND
RETIRED MONTANA PEN1TEN
, TIARY WARDEN SAYS WOULD
«mni r'rinv
FOOD PRODUCTION
Dudley Jones, who retired as warden
0 f the Montana penitentiary Dec 1.
; advocates purchaiTby the staS of
farm land in the Deer Lodge area In
: order to Increase production of food
in ! stuffs for the prison and other state
by j institutions.
His recommendation was contained
in an open letter to the general pub
Uc - which said such a move' would
i 54ve "taxpayers thousands of dollars
: each year."
At present, most of the land used
85 p rison farms is rented from prl
i vat * owner*.
"Rented land does not get the re
j suits like land that Is owned and can
! 06 Unproved and made to produce
; more crops," Jones said, and added:
' "Th* labor at the prison and Warm
Springs (mental hospital) could be
used to good advantage and there is
enough help in these two Institutions
ra^ enough produce for other
state Institutions. If the proper kind
of land was purchased by the state
and put into a high state of cultlva
; tlon, the taxpayers would be ahead
thousands of dollars."
; -
10 Montana CollPOP
18 Montana ^ »liege
Instructors Called
Eighteen members of the Montana
State college faculty have been called
to the armed services or to serve In In
dustrial or teaching positions connect
ed with the war effort in less than a
year, according to a compilation made
by President W. M. Coblelgh. Others
of the faculty have given a portion of
the college year to war research work
after which they have returned to
their teaching duties at the college.
Of the 18 who have left the campus,
12 are In the army. They are: Charles
A. Herring, Richard Briggs, Vincent E.
Iverson, Arthur Kegel, Walter Kettula,
William V. Mayer, Thomas D. Wat
kins, Marvin F. Kelly, David S. Hawes,
Maxwell Sargent, R. H. Palmer, and
T. V. Dolan. Harold G. Halcrow is
with the army air corps.
Dolan first left to serve with the
American Red Cross but in October
resigned to enter the army. Schubert
Dyche, professor of physical educa
tion and football coach, is with the
American Red Cross In England.
Clarence H. Holleman and J. Craig
Sheppard are with aircraft manu
facturers, and C. H. Prick and Albert
in
M Stone are engaged In defense in
dustry.
J.

9 BILLIONS IN BONDS
Life insurance Investments in gov
ernment bonds will reach approxi
mately $9,300,000,000 at the end of this
year, or more than one-quarter of the
total admitted assets of all United
States legal reserve companies, ac
cording to a survey by toe association
of life insurance presidents. The re
sults of the survey are contained in a
report submitted to member com
panies by Vincent P. Whltsltt, man
ager and general counsel of the as
sociation.
The war production board, which
cut off manufacture of new fishing
tackle for sportsmen on May 31, now
has prohibited use of metal, plastics
or cork in repairing non-commercial
tackle or producing repair parts.
«-I I
Lubricants
Call in Socony-Vacuum for
Correct Lubrication
The correct lubrication of mechanical
equipment contributes to the long life of
machinery and minimum expense for
repairs and replacements of worn parts; it
saves labor, conserves power, helps to avoid
shut downs, and is a vital factor in main
taining maximum production at least pos
sible cost. •
In thousands of plants of every description
throughout industry, the expression
"Correct Lubrication" is synonymous with
Socony-Vacuum Lubricants and specialized
lubrication engineering service.
SOCONY-VACUUM OIL CO., INC.
WHITE EAGLE DIVISION
First Notional Bonk Bldg.
' Greet Foils
4
I
Young Man Of Butte
Advanced to Major
Oapt. Thomas J. B. Shanley, Jr., 34.
of Butte, now on foreign service with
the parachute branch of the United
States army, has been promoted to
the rank of major. His exact where
abouts was not learned.
Major Shanley Is a son of Dr. and
Mrs. T. J. Shanley, widely known
Butte residents. He was born in Butte
and attended local schools, graduating
from Boys Central high school. Fol
lowing his high school career he was
appointed to West Point Military
academy as a result of a competitive
examination. He was graduated from
the academy with the class of 1939 as
a second lieutenant and assigned to
the Presidio at San Francisco. While
at the Presidio he was promoted to
first lieutenant, and to captain at
about the time war was declared a
year ago.
The Swiss family makes a big cheese
on the day a child is bom, putting
toe newcomer's name and the date on
it. At each birthday celebration and
at every other important event In the
child's life, toe cheese is displayed
and eaten. It accompanies toe person
from birth to the grave. Swiss news
papers recently had a story of a cheese
120 years old, said to be "delicious."
Read the Classified Advertisements
Geology
applied to oil
field problems
Here is a clear, concise and prac
tical work on the occurrence of oil
and its geology, covering facts about
petroleum methods of geologic ex
ploration, factors in oil production.
Just Out!
New, Up-to-Date 5th Edition
Practical
Oil Geology
By DORSEY HAGER
466 Pages, fully Illustrated
$4.00
This Is a guidebook of all-around
interest for toe oil geologist, pro
ducer and engineer. Descriptive and
reference materials are combined
to cover every phase of prospecting
for oil and exploiting oil fields in
which geologic science may be ap
plied.
The book gives you a clear discus
sion of how oil originates and ac
cumulates, stratigraphic facts of
special Interest to toe oil geologist,
chapter on methods of prospecting
and mapping, occurrence and an
alyses of oil shale, etc.
SUPPLY DEPARTMENT
Montana Oil and
Mining Journal
Great Falls, Montasu

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