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Montana oil and mining journal. [volume] (Great Falls, Mont.) 1931-1953, August 17, 1946, Image 8

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075103/1946-08-17/ed-1/seq-8/

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Callahan Will Address Minin g
Men at Association Convention
Donald A. Callahan, Wallace, Idaho, vice president of the Ameri
can Mining Congress of Washington, D. C.; president of the Callahan
Consolidated Mining Co., and formerly state senator of Idîfho, will
address the eighth summer convention of the Mining Association
of Montana, to be held in Missoula Aug. 30 and 31.
Burks To Spud
Wildcat Soon
WINNETT. — Bill Burks of Bil
lings, a former Cut Bank operator
and a driller during the first Cat
Creek oil boom, will
first well on the Teigen ranch with
in the next two weeks.
Name and description of the loca
tion is Telgen-Burks No. I, NE NE
NE 31-15N-25E. and is a short half
mile from a well drilled in 1925 by
Gordon Campbell which was report
ed as having a good oil show in the
first Cat Creek sand at around 800
feet. The well was drilled to a depth
of 1100 feet, casing pulled and aban
doned.
L. J. Be vis of Cat Creek moved
equipment to the well site Wednes
day to make location. Some drilling
equipment has already been moved
in and the cable tool rig is to be
moved in from Cut Bank some time
next week.
Bill Burks was well known here
during the first Cat Creek oil boom
as a cable tool driller, having drilled
six wells in the field.
The venture is being financed by
a group of Great Falls men, C. W.
Eggers of Soft Water Service, Inc.,
Charles Barclay. W. R. Welter, Oli
ver Spencer, E. G. Lindholm. This
syndicate, with Burks having an in
terest, have seven sections of state
land, the Teigen ranch and other
acreages leased on what is known
as the McDonald creek anticline.
Plans call for the drilling of three
wells.
Location for the first well is a
quarter mile south of the McDonald
creek bridge south of Teigen, east
of the road.—Winnett Times.
spud in his
RICHFIELD WILDCAT
RESUMING AT 1730
Wildcat of the Richfield Oil Com
pany of Montana, on the Mission
Creek structure near Livingston,
has resumed drilling at 1730 feet,
following an extended shutdown.
Location is SE SE SW 20-2S-11E.
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1
S
Oil Field Credits
s
i
Whether Such Credits Are Based On the Acquisition
or Development of
=
I
ACREAGE
PRODUCTION
PROCESSING
i
ROYALTIES
s or any other part of the Petroleum industry, we are
5 equipped by experience and resources to care for your
= requirements.
5
I
!
The First National Bans
of Great Falls, Montana
Resources $30,000,000
5
I

5
Affiliated With FB8C
Member Federal Deposit Imemrance Corporation
s
Callahan, whose counsel Is widely
sought on economic questions per
taining to the mining Industry, will
make the principal address at the
Saturday afternoon session of the
convention, his subject being
Value of Your Mining Association."
That session will be presided over
by Wray Farmin, Spokane, presi
dent of the Northwest Mining as
sociation.
Other speakers on that progra
will be John D. Bradley and Harry
W. Marsh, Boise, president and
retary of the Idaho Mining associa
tion; A. G. Mackenzie and J. K.
Richardson, Salt Lake City, vice
S resident and manager of the Utah
[etal Mine Operators association;
Sidney Ward. Clinton, Montana,
president of the Western Montana
Mine Owners and Operators associa
tion; Gallen T. Vandel, Helena, presi
dent of the Last Chance Gulch Min
ing association; Frank Madden, Dil
lon, past president of the Beaver
head County Mining association; P.
V. Jackson, Norris, president of the
Madison County Mining association,
and Carl J. Trauerman, Butte, man
ager of the Mining Association of
Montana.
The public is Invited to attend the
business and social functions of the
convention. Reservations for the
luncheon and banquet on August 31
should be made immediately with
the Mining Association of Montana,
Butte.
The
m
sec
STOCKS OF CRUDE
STILL INCREASING
Stocks of domestic and foreign
crude petroleum at the close of the
week ended July 27 totaled 223,756,
000 barrels, according to data re
ported to the Bureau of Mines,
United States Department of the
Interior. Compared with the total
of 222,740,000 balrels for the pre
ceding week, this represents an in
crease of 1,016,000 barrels compris
ing an increase of 778,000 barrels in
stocks of domestic crude and an in
crease of 238,000 barrels in stocks of
foreign crude. Heavy crude oil
stocks in California, not included in
the gasoline-bearing stocks totaled
4,613,000 barrels, a decrease of 11,000
barrels.
New U.S.G.S. M»p Covers
South Wind River Basin
A geological map of an area about 1300 square miles in the
southern part of the Wind River basin and adjacent areas in central
Wyoming has been issued by the Geological Survey. The map,
which has been in administrative use In the survey for many years,
has been made available to the public because of the current interest
in oil and gas possibilities in this part of Wyoming.
MUCH CRUDE LEFT
IN DEPUTED SANDS
Through efficient application of
known secondary recovery methods
the nation's crude oil reserves could
be doubled, and there would yet re
main in the reservoir as much oil
as has been produced, Don T. An
drus, Bradford, Pa., operator and
water flooding expert, said in a talk
before the Interstate Oil Compact
Commission recently.
"Our country has produced 28
billion barrels of oil and we are
estimating expected recovery of 20
billion barrels more, but there are
still more than 100 billion barrels
of oil remaining in Reids now dis
covered and being produced. We
talk dolefully about approaching ex
haustion of our oil supply when in
truth we have about four-fifths of
it remaining in the ground. We are
like a little boy who has licked the
frosting off the cake but has not
got around to eating the cake," he
said.
"In the six leading oil states—
Texas, California, Oklahoma. Lou
isiana. Kansas and Illinois—alone
there is left four times the amount
of oil the country has used to date.
"Here Is oil In almost unthinkable
quantities, and yet oil which the
mind of man has given almost no
thought toward recovering—surely
not a fraction of the effort which
has developed radar or monster
planes, not to say anything of
atomic power. Even the recovery
one barrel In ten of It would add
enormous resource to any of the
states involved."
of.
ar
STATE GASOLINE TAX
ESTABLISHES RECORD
Net gasoline tax collections in
Montana broke all records in the
first seven months of 1946, totaling
$3,391,543, according to Grover Ste
venson, executive secretary of the
Montana Petroleum Industries Com
mittee. Previous high mark for the
first seven months of any year was
set In 1941, when net revenues for
the seven-month period totaled $2,
995,379.
There are now 4,837 drilling rigs
In operation In the United States
of which 2,980 are rotary and 1,857
cable-tool type.
MINING SUPPLIES
Of Every Description
Ore cars
Chain Blocks
Coppus Blowers
Mine Signal Switches
Mine Rails
Ore Sacks
Water Bags
One Man Mine Saws
Carbide Lamps
Prospecting Hoists
Yale Hoisting Blocks
Beebe All-Steel Hoists
Buzzer and Trip Gong Bells
Track Spikes
Nail Bags
Miners'Axes
Miners' Candles
Parts for Yale Spur Geared Chain Hoists
Miners' Skullguards and Cape
AND A COMPLETE LINE OF INGERSOLL-RAND
MINING EQUIPMENT
MONTANA HARDWARE COMPANY
BUTTE — GREAT FALLS
Three oil and gas fields have been
discovered within the area, and ad
ditional drilling may yield further
discoveries. The map now published
will be a useful general guide in the
search. It is a westward extension of
the area shown on Preliminary Map
51 of the
Gas Ial
was race
it was t
basis of Sell tûv
logical Survey's Oil and
galions séries, which
published. Like Map 51
•ed on the
ns made in
1918*14 and has been published es
sentially in its original form. Sub
sequent changes in formation names
are shown by a stratigraphic section
that compares present usage
prevailing at the time the
made; highways, county Unes,
and the location of oil and gas fields
have been added
The map, published on a
sheet measuring 28 by 82
and titled "Geologic Map of the
Southern Part of the Wind River
Basin and Adjacent Areas in Cen
tral Wyoming," by C. J. Hares, M.
W. Bafl, Stuart St Clair, J. B. Ree
side, Jr., K. C. Heald, and A. C. Col
lins, has been issued as Preliminary
Map 60 o fthe Oil and Gas Investiga
tions series. Copies may be pur
chased from the Director of the Geo
logical Survey, Washington 26, D. C,
at 80 cents each. Copies will be avail
able also for "over-the-counter" sale
at Geological Survey field offices at
the Federal building, Casper, Wyo,;
at Room 814 Boston bufiding 828
17th street Denver, Colo.; and at
Room 284 Federal building, Tulsa,
Oklahoma.
wlth
that
map
was
lie
In
G. E. HOUGH
Miles City, Montana
(ML AND GAS LEASES
M-SC0PE and MT-SC0PE
For toeattmg of ore bodtee,
▼otaM, pocket« and Cndte.
FREE LITERATURE upon re
quest Also contracted geophysi
cal surveys. Latest pamphlet on
geophyaical prospecting Ulus
tratedT for mining engineers and
prospectors, postpaid lor 60 cents.
I
ream s * effortl to be
Witkovt Ode tatorrestto»
fisher
Heeearck Laboreror-i
» AHe, Calif oral»
Pale

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