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The Bozeman weekly chronicle. (Bozeman, Mont.) 1883-1889, June 30, 1886, Image 4

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075108/1886-06-30/ed-1/seq-4/

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The Coster Massacre.
The tenth anniversary of the Custer
massacre, which was observed at the
battle-field in Yellowstone county last
Fridav by a few army officers and others
recalls vividly to the minds of many the
history of that momentous encounter.
General .Tames S. Brisbm has written
a detailed account in relation to the mns
sacre. He believes that one of Custer s
force, a Crow Indian, escaped, ami he
recites his story as follows:
"The only man known to have escaped
from the Custer massacre was Curly, ■
Cn,w Indian. I knew Curly well, and
talked to him about the battle. He was
outs detailed from
, with Mich Boyer
one of the six Crow »
Gibbon's column to g
and George Herenden to guide Custer.
Just ltefore the battle < aster sent llcren
Face and two other
Keno. ami took Mich
Crows with his
i, Half-Yellow
,w scouts with
ver, Curly and tw
Herenden, Half-Fellow
two Crows with Reno
Rover and two of
taped uetuii, ..... 1 I * 1 . ... ,
Crows with (aster were killed.
,nly man who escaped,
ami I "ill let him tell his own story.
His were the only eyes of all the hun
dreds in Custer's column that
battle and were not closed in
Curly said:
"'I went down with the tw
Crows and went into action with Custer
The General kept down the river on the
four miles after Reno had
south side above. He
vould drive down the
„ v could attack the vil
i..< he believing Rem
column,
and the
.J death, but
the
Curlv was the
law the
death.
U her
north hank
crossed to the
thought Reno
valley so that t
läge on two s
would take it at the upper end, while tie
(Custer) would go in at the lower end
Custer had to go further down the river
and further away from Reno than lie
wished, on account of the steep hank
along the north side; but at last he fuun
a ford and dashed for it. The Indians
met him and poured a volley in a heavy
fire across the narrow river. Custer dis.
mounted to light on foot, hut could not
get iiis skirmishers across the stream.
Meantime hundreds of Indians on foot
and on ponies poured over the ri\ei
which was only about three feet deej
and filled the ravine on both sides of
Custer's men. Custer then fell back t
some high ground behind him and seized
the ravines in his immediate vicinity
The Indians completely surrounded Cus
ter ami poured in a terrible lire on all
sides. They charged Custer on foot in
vast numbers, but were again and again
driven back. The fight began about two
o'clock and lasted until the sun went
down over the hills. The men fought
desperately, and alter the ammunition
in their belts was exhausted, went to
their saddle-hags, got more and contin
ued the fight. The Big Chief Custer
lived until nearly all his men had been
killed or wounded, and went about en
couraging his soldiers to figth on. Custer
got shot here (in his left side) and sat
down with his revolver in his hand.
Another shot struck him and he fell
over. The last officer killed was a man
who rode a w hite horse (Lieut. Cook.)
When I saw Custer hopelessly surround
ed, I watched my opportunity, got a
Sioux blanket, put it on and walked up
a ravine, and when the Sioux charged I
got among them and they did not know
me from any of their own men. There
were some mounted Sioux, and seeing
one fall 1 ran to him, caught his pony,
mounted it and galloped down as ifg'ûng
toward the white men. but turned up a
little ravine and got away. As I rode off
I saw. when nearly a mile from the bat
SluWoRf, m if/KCi» oi m«ro oolJiosw in «
ravine fighting with Sioux all around
them. I think they were all killed, as
they were outnumbered five to one and
apparently all dismounted. I saw one
cavalry soldier who hail got away. He
was well mounted, but shot in both hips.
I think he starved to death in the Bad
Lands, or more likelv his trail was fol
lowed and he was killed by the Sioux.'
Such was the story of the great battle.
"This, probably, is the most we shall
ever know of Custer's battle. It is
enough. Curly was apparently a truth
ful Indian and told his story in a
straightforward manner. The records
show that he was with Custer, and all
he says is likely correct. So let it rest."
Indian Reservations.
Senator Harrison, from the Committee
of Indian Affairs, filed a supplementary
report regarding the investigation of the
condition of the Indians upon reserva
tions. The rejKirt of the committee says
regarding the Crow Reservation ttiat
there are about 1,050 Indians drawing
rations there. The report says: "The
Committee are of opinion that the
Reservation is much larger than is need
ed or can be used by the Indians resid
ing therein; but if the lands are covenant
ed by treaty with them, we cannot re
possess them without the consent of the
Indians. We believe it is entirely
practicable to procure the consent of
the Indians to a reasonable reduction of
this Reservation. In the opinion of the
Committee, the consideration of $50,000
per year given by Messrs. Blake and
Wilson for the rental of between 2,500,
Ü00 and 3,000,000 acres of these lands
was very inadequate, and the report says:
"Charges of fraud in the negotiation of
the lease were made. It is enough to say
that the Indians are incapable of the in
telligent transaction of such business. If
leases are to be allowed at all, the De
partment slituld have taken the entire
supervision of t he business."
What Farming Is.
Farming is something beyond mere
hoe exeicise.
Farming feeds all the world, and fur
nishes material for its clothing.
Farming is brains put to use. Farming
is the life with the most healthful, most
beautiful, most ennobling surround
ings.
Farming is the highest phase of manu
facturing, for it deals with life as the
most potent factory in the processes of
the art.
Farming is commerce, and the good
buyer and seller is the most successful
farmes, who must watch the markets the
course of supply and demand, and shape
his operations accordingly.
Old horses often get in the habit of
swallowing their food too fast. This is
from a painful realization of the danger
of not getting a square meal if they de
lay. None the less the habit is a bad
one, and should be corrected. A few
clean cobble stones mixed with the oats
in their box and left there will cause
them to pick the feed over slowly and
masticate it more thoroughly. Cut feed is
less likely to be eaten rapidly than
whole grain, and dry meal than that
which has been wet.
In his first message to congress, Presi
dent Cleveland said: "The fathers of
c ur families are the best citizens of the
republic. Wife and children are the
sources of patriotism, and conjugal and
[»rental affection begets devotion to tbe
country."
THINGS TERRITORIAL.
Tho Fort Peck Indian Agency has
another agent.
Sixteen briek buildings are in c -urse
of erection in Livingston.
The .Montana wool crop will be much
heavier this vear than usual.
President Harris is expected over the
road in a few days on his annual tour of
inspection.
Montana wools are still quoted in the
Boston market as follows: F'ine, 21 .«-22c;
medium, 21C« 23c;
The Moulton Mining company, Tliurs
day, shipped twelve bars of bullion
valued at $15,400.
The Crow Indians are said to he set-|
tling down on severalty lands and niak
ing some attempts at farming.
Large stock owners believe they- will
have to erect feeding houses on the
ranges before many seasons pass.
The artesian well in the Miles Citv
court yard flows at the rate of 125 bar -
rels in twelve hours. Water was struck
at 350 feet.
The dry-goods merchants of Helena
are trying to arrange to close their stoics
at S o'clock in the evenings, thus giving
themselves and their clerks an op
portunity for necessary recreation.
T. W. Kane iV < 'o., brokers claiming to
represent Win, Martin it Co., of Helena,
failqd,not paying the balances due to
customers. Mr. Kane says that Martin
& Co. have a balance sufficient to meet
the liabilities but refuses to forward the
in the House on motion of Scott, of
Pennsylvania, the Right-of-Way hill
through the northern Indin reservations
was taken up and passed by a decisive j
vote. .Haxing previously passed the Sen- !
ate, the hill, with the sanction of the j
President, which is assured beyond all I
peradventure, becomes a law at once,
A Union Pacific circular just issued j
authorizes a half rate tarft both ways be- j
tween all stations on the Utah it North- j
ern and Oregon Short Line upon race j
horses, sulkies and other pharaphalia, j
also half rate both ways to one man in;
charge, on account of the Montana races,
from July 3d to August 23d. The order i
takes effect at once and ex [lires Septem- !
ber 1st.
Bruce Wallace, who carried off the j
territorial honors fur the W est Point j
cadetship, has sent a telegram from West j
Point to his brother, Wm. Wallace, Jr.,'
announcing the fact that he had passed |
the West Point examination and was in j
barracks on the Hudson. He passed the ,
physical examination on Monday, the j
14th, and the examination as to mental j
acquirements commenced on Wednesday j
and closed on Saturday.
Three fine saddle horses were stolen i
from Mussigbrod & Mitchell's pasture at ;
Warm springs. One of them was the |
property of Dr. Mitchell, another belong
ed to Mr. Deschield of Deer Lodge, and
the third was the joint property of the
two doctors. The animals were taken
out of the pasture at about 4 a. m. An
employe saw them being led out, but
supposed another employe was doing it
and thought no more about it.
On the 20th of last April a 13-year-old
boy named Harry Nichols "played
hookey" and went to the Odd F'ellows'
picnic at Anaconda. Since that date the
boy's parents have neither seen nor
heard of him, and a systematic search of
the city has failed to discover him. The
liny iu l'ï ÿUMMi af «8° > ^* ao hoi»»
and eyes, ana wnen be lert home was
dressed in a suit of dark-colored clothing
straw hat, navy-blue shirt and laced
shoes. Any person knowing anything
of tlie boy's whereabouts will confer a
favor on the uneasy parents bv coin
municating with Sheriff Sullivan, of
Butte.
A Child of the Howling west.
The following item refers to the ac-.
complished Supeiintendent of the Public j
schools of Lewis and Clark countv.
'Truly America deyeloi* some strange j
characters, says a writer in the New F ork j
World, There came to New York some;
time ago a woman with a history that
readH like a romance. She is the daugli •
ter of Gen. Malcolm Clarke, of the regular
army, who was killed by an Indian whom j
he had befriended some years ago, and |
who left a family of eight children the j
result of his marriage with an Indian]
squaw. Miss Helen Clarke, the eldest of j
these children, was educated at a convent
in Cincinnati, and is possessed of a very j
biilliaut mind and unusual histrionic j
talent and came here to prepare herself ;
for the stage, which she proposes adopt- ;
ing as a profession. Her presence where- |
ever she appeared in the city never fail- j
ed to attract attention, as her looks pro
claimed the Indian beyond a doubt. Tall,
straight, sinewy, with wiry black hair
and the unmistakable Indian features,
she presented a remarkable appearance,
especially when elegantly attired. She is
well known in the West, where her
father's bravery won for himself and
children a name, and in Montana, where
she was born and still lives, she holds
the position of commissioner of publie
schools, her duties in this capacity neces
sitating her traveling much alone over
that wild mountain country, often on
horseback, with a revolver in her belt.
On one of these pleasant little jaunts,
while going through a lonely spot
known as Prickly-Pear canyon one misty
November morning; Miss Clarke dis
covered the bodies of five road agents
hanging from limbs of trees where they
had been made to answer to the vigi
lantes for their crimes the night previous,
a sight that would have rather shaken
the nerves of a New York society woman
but this child of the howling west was
too well accustomed to life on the border
to be frightned at anything of that sort,
and rode calmly on. Her father and one
of her brothers were shot down before
her, and from her inlancv she had been
used to danger. She is highly connected
on her fathers side, and inherits a fortune
from him, while her mother still remains
with her tribe, the Black feet Indians.
While here Miss Clarke was for some
time the guest of Gen. and Mrs. Palmer,
the latter being her cousin. She thought
New York life tame and New F'ork wom
en rather uninteresting They lacked the
nerve that constitutes one of the chief
charms of a Western belle, of .vhorn Miss
Clarke is a fair sample."
Undigested Food
In the stomach develops an acid which stings
the upper part of the throat and palate, esua
ing"heartburn »• It also evolves s gss which
produces "wind on the stomach," and a feel
ing and appearance of distension in that or
gan after eating. For both this scidity and
swelling Hostetler's Stomach Bitters is a
much better remedy than alkaline salts, liks
hartshorn and carbonate of soda. A wine
glassful of the Bitters, after or before dinner
Till be found to act as a rel table carminative
Jr preventive. This line specific for dyspep.
si*, both in its acute and chronic form, alsp
prevents and cures malarial fever, constipa
tion, liver complaint, kidney troubles, ner
vousness and debility. Persons wboobsenrs
In themselves a decline of vigor should nil
this fine tonic without delay.
j
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ROYAL
&AKIM c
POWDER
Absolutely Pure.
Tills powder never varies. A marvel of
purity, strength and wholesomeuess. More
economical than the ordinary kinds, and
cannot be sold in competition with the mul
titude of low test, short weight, alum or
phosphate powders. Sold only in cans. The
Royal Baking Powder Co.. 100 Wall St., N. Y.
A
Rev.SamP. JoucsSermons
gents wanted
FOR
The first and only illustrated book of ser
mons in the world, as well as Coe only full
and complete edition, it contains more ser
moiisand fuller reports than any other edi
tion published, the admirable correctness of,
which, Mr. Jones lias explicitly certified to.
As delivered in Chicago, Cincinnati, Ht. Louis
Atlanta, AiiKusta.Waeo, Memphis, kashville, I
Baltimore, d-c. Contains «OU paxes, and over
tie full pages illustrations, with best portraits
of Sam Jones and sum Small ever engraved.
-THE ONLY
HONEST AND AUTHENTIC EDITION
Only full reports printed ; d< not mistake
it for one of the small pamphlet editions.
Sam Jones has repeatedly denounced these
garbled and abbreviated reports as without
bis sanction, and as doing him rank injustice.
Write at once for illustrated circulars and
terms, and name your choice of territory ; or
to secure it instantly, send 75 cents for com
plete agent's outfit, wtiieix will be forwarded
by return mail, postpaid. Pastage stamps
accepted. Liberal terms guaranteed. Address
H EITERT & (ULE Publishing Co.,
810 it 812 Olive Street., ST. LOUIS, MO.
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Farmers, Ranchmen!
STOCKMEN
HERE ARE SOME PACTS.
That will interest you.
We are the sole Agents for the Deering Har
vester and Binder, Giant Mower, Buck
eye Rake, and Force Pumpst the
famous Studebaker Spiing and
Farm Wagons, Fürst & Bradley
and Peru City plows.
A"<i a itxigir «nnmiit of other Machinery needed hv mmeesafiil fonnora u r «
agente for the best makes of reliable firms ; machinery that combine
simplicity with the latest of modern improveneute calculated
- to save labor, and give the best results. For instance,
take our Giant mower with its knife sections 2}
inches wide, making it easier to draw,
the grass is subdivided better and
cut more easily ; the cut
ting angles of
the knife
is more effective.
These mowers cannot be
improved upon, esj«ecially for
cutting light or hunch grass, come and
see them before purchasing. Those who have
tried our DFIERING HARVESTERS have always ad
mitted them to lie UNSURPASSED. This year we will still
show you further improvements in them. It will be to your advantage to call
L. Benepe.
Bozeman, Montana.
TIVOLI+BEE R*H ALL* A N D*S ALOON.
IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC BEER, F'INE LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
Imported Delicacies of all kinds. Lunches put up at short notice.
FINE FURNISHED ROOMS TO RENT.
V ogel <fc Buell 1er,
Main Street - Bozeman, Montana
LOUIS SPERLING!
Having purchased the entire business I am now ready to meet my competitors
with prices, and as I am daily receiving fresh
Groceries !
--A LARGE INF'OICE OF
Clothing, Boots and Shoes.
j list ^ Received.,
OATS, FLOUR, GRAIN, &c.
Taken in Exchange.
Flannels, Jeans, Quilts
Blankets, waterproofs, Yarns and
FURNISHING * GOODS
A LARGE AMOUNT OF REMANENTS AT A BARGAIN.
ES?"Ft will be to the advantage of eyery man owing this firm to settle at cnce
and save a large amount of costs.
Pure ice delivered to any part of the city
in quantities to suit purchasers.
H. CLEVELAND,
BOZEMAN,
MONTANA
MOUNTAINEER
Will make the season of 1886 at
BOZEMAN, MONTANA,
for a limited number of Mares,
$25 FUR THE SEASON,
With the privilege of returning if not
with foal.
PKDFURKK : -
Mountaineer by Clark Chief, Jr.; first
dam Mary Flagle, by American Clay, 2d
dam by Gray Flagle and 3rd dam In
old. weighs
hands high.
1150 pounds, stands
i.'iS
. T , ,
Imported Hooton, sire of Lulu dam,
\i„i,m
record of —. 1 - * •} - Mahogony hay, III years
JR.
CLARK CHIEF,
Will make the season of 1880,
AT HELENA AND DEER LODGE.
We also have a
FOUR YEAR OLD STALLION,
16 hands high, bv Clark Chief, Jr.,
weighs 1180 pounds. Brown in color
and is for sale.
K. T. BARNETT.
CARS OB' IT !
FRUIT. FRUIT.
PENDLETON'S
-Wholesale and Retail—
CONFECTIONERY, CIGAR,
Tobacco and Notion Store.
E. J. OWENHOUSE,
(Successor to F'rank Essler,)
Saddles,
"Chaps, '
Quirts,
Spurs,
Harness,
Riatas,
Cinchas,
THE FINEST WORKiFOR THE LEAST MONEY
Give Me A Cali. Before Purchasing Elsewhere.
CASH PAID FOR HIDES. WOOL. Ac. and OATS TAKEN IN TRADE.
MATTHEW S'
*HOT •» SPRINGS*
HEALTH AND PLEASURE RESORT.
Matthews' hot SPRINGS, neab bozeman, mostasa. [From a sketch by John Passmore.
-Seven Mtles From Rozeman.—
J. MATTHEWS, Proprietor.
ANY ONE CAN
Become mo thoroughly posted iu
three weeka' reviewing with the
COMMON SCHOOL
QUESTION X
W ....... By it*
□cation
CERTIFICATES CAN BE OBTAINED.'
A better review cad be xntde from thla book In one week than from Text Books In three month«. In prw
paring for examination« it has no equal.
PARLIAMENTARY RULES ARE WORTH THE PRICE.
U does not deal in proofs or arguments. Questions nre stated, and short and comprehensive answer*
given. It supplies »want long felt among teachers In reviewing brlerty and comprehensively the different
branches taught In our schools, without recourse to the tedious process of examining the text books from be
gtnnlng to end. The arrangement has been carefully studied. The questions on each of the studies embrace
an the leading and technical point». This work Is especially adapted to Normal training. Institutes, or tbe
private library when a general review is required to prepare for school certificates. It is only to be seen to
be appreciated. Many claim that tbe book can bavuno equaj. considering the assistance It renders In review
ing and bringing back to memory the principal questions represented In colpmoij school studies.
TIISTIMONIAX-S.
[Extract» from Letters to A. H. Craig, representing thousande of nammeip
dations. )
New York.—I have sold over 10,0» copies, and the demand still continue».
I have never handled a hook which gave such general satisfaction.
W. 0. HAGAK, Ed Pupil's Companion.
Svbaccs*. N. Y.—you have a splendid book for teachers and reviewing
classes, and it is bound to have a very large circulation. Ship 1.0» by freight
C. W. BARDEEN, Dealer in School Supplies.
St. Albans. Vt.-They sell at sight, and are highly recomtnende.d by our
advanced teachers. ALBERT F. LANS.
Bryan, Tex.—I have used your Book for several years, and am mack
pleased with it. WM. A. BANKS, A. M.. Sup't City ScLools.
One Copy, SI. 50; Two Copies, »«.SO;
Six Copie», 86.00. tr Sent by mull. AGENTS WAITED.
SEND 35 CENTS for canvassing book; terms and instruction* to
agents; recommends, description, binding, etç. Thirty cent* allowed lx
returned In exchange for Question Book.
As Hi CRAIG) publishes! Caldwell, Racine Co., Wie*
UT 1 Remit by Money Order or Postal Note on East Troy, Wi*., or by Begi*
tere4 jjcuier pq CqJdwelJ, Wly. Small amounts by eoinuiofl ifi&ii
3500 3500
QUESTIONS. ANSWERS.
Each branch is divided in to
two departments, one for
questions and one fur an
iwers. Each question Is
numbered and a like npmber
la given the corresponding
answer.
Civil Government,
Parliamentary Buies,
Beading, [Made Easy,
Infinitives mud Participles
Penmanship,
Physiology,
(Inited States History,
Geography,
Grammar,
Written Arithmetic,
Physical Geography,
Orthography.
HELENA IRON WORKS.
fu."
' ESTABLISHED 1867
W est Main St., Helena, M< rcra
B. H. TATEM, Proprietor.
Mining, Milling and General Mach)»
ery. Iron and Brass Castings of every
description, Chilled Castings of unex
celled quality, (Special machinery or
dered from the manufacturers. Fargo s
Patent Stamp Guide. Antracite, Bi
tuminous and Blacksmith's Coal
Wholesale and Retail.
I I. R. ARMENT,
EAST MAIN STREET, - - BOZEMAN.
Dealers in
FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES, IMPORTED and DOMESTIC CIGARS,
LIVE AND DRESSED POULTRY, RANCH BUTTER AND EGGS.
F'INE CANDIES AND NUTS. Will deliver goods to any part of the city.
1880. FIVE YEARS Of PROGRESS. 1886.
^WILLI AM * NEVITT,^
-My Specialities are
STEEL NAILS & BARB WIRE
T.
Hardware,
Tinware,
AND
House
Furnishing
Goods.
SashDoors
and Blinds
Building
Paper and
Roofing
Felt.
As I buy in car load lots, will make bottom prices.
TIN AND IRON ROOFING.
A_firet-class tin shop in connection. Correspondence solicited.
W. M. NEVITT.
A. LAMME
J. S. MENDENHALL
y^mme <$ Co
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
FINE GROCERIES !
IUEENSWARE
•I
H ardware ,
-A COMPLETE STOCK OF
Boots
-AND
LIQUOR]
CIGARS
BOZEMAN, - - - - MONTANA.
Patronize Direct Importation.
WSMi
a«*
KENTUCKY.
A#™
m
Ll% S
OIS'U
office
0
Knees.
uTHti-co-Citea.
THE ABOVE WELL-KNOWN BRAND HAS BP7EN ANALYIZED BY THE
most prominent chemists and pronounced by all to be
F'REE FROM ANY ADULTERATION,
AND IS ALSO HIGHLY RECOMMENDED
By the meijical faculty for medicinal and famjlv purposes, Orders ip wholesale
taken to he shipped direct from the distillery, hy
W. IT. TRACY,
Sole Agent for Bozeman, M. T. For sale also by the barrel, half-barrel and
in kegs of fifteen, ten and five gallons each ; all in the original packages and under
the Kentucky stamps. For sale also retail bv the gallon and bottle. Bottle goods
none genuine unless bearing the signature of W. H. Tracy, over the cork.
el
lc
C. HAMILTON,
GEO. W. MARDIS
HAMILTON
MARDIS,
$5
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
all Kind* - of
FRESH AND SALT MEATS
Eggs, Butter and Vegetables.
Poultrv Always on Hand and Garne i u Season
Next to Nichols'Hardware Store. - - Branch shop ^berline
(Joi
It
Vi
Humphreys
H JMlOPrtTHIC
Veterinary Specify
Cure H of
Horses, Cattle, Sheep
! DOGS, HOGS, POULTRY,
In use for over 20 years by Farmer^
Stockbreeders, Horse It. R., Ac.
Usnd by U. S. Government.
•»- STABLE CHART
Mounted on Rollers A Book Mailed Free.
Humphreys' Med. Co*. 108 Fulton Si., 1,|
O TEAM PLANING MILL.
KOCH & VREELAND PROPS,
Wje keep at our Lumber Yard a
pleti 1 stock of
SEASONED LUMBER,
are prepared at all times to do
PROMPTLY AND WEi.L

carry Sash, Doors, etc., in fact h
and
We
ERY 1'HING in theLUMBF]
''H I.lV;B
1 in the construction of budiiJi
FREE DELIVERRY. Ü
—GIVE US A CALL.
AI.L KINDS OF CONTRACTS TAKfJ
I I
me
nesp
pu
elena Business UollegeJ»
ENGLISH TRAINING SCHOOL 1
CO tNER MAIN * SIXTH A VK., HF.LESjB
M. r., Re-Opened Tuesday, sect, ut, a: ,8
will continue throughout the year,
practical school for young men anj
l wishing to acquire a thorough bun"
'"education. The courses of instructs *
ued here are Commercial, Breparator ™
nglit-h, stenography and Type wrltln,"
Art. Crayon and Architectural drawing
K-KEEPINO, PENMANSHIP and STENonjll
RAPHY a SPECIALTY. ' gj
ie same text-books and modes of teachiul
used here as in the celebrated Bryantl!
i.ton Business Colleges. 1
renlng session from October to April
ew circular giving course of study rati
ion, &c. free. Address,
H. T. ENGELHORN,) „ .
Or E. O. RAlLSBACK.f Princl P
Watches,
Jewelry
bolid Silver
Plated war
French decks',
OPERA GLASSES,
Spectacle!
Look everywhere, but come here and
see us before you buy. Out
prices and goods can not be
duplicated in the
territory.
E^ery Article Warranted
AS REPRESENTED.
Pease & Steffins,
Jewelers,
REMEMBER THIS
F you wisli to buy anythin?
thp line pf
WATCHES, CLOCKS
iwclry, Silverware or Specta
cles, call and see my prices and
goods. lean and will sei 1 good
goods at the
LOWEST PRICES
good Stem Winding. ^ Qï;
oin Silver Elgin watch lor
$!6.00, A good eight day
lock for $6.00.
el
lc
All other goods at the same
\v prices.
F. W. VAN ALLESf
iladl
RA1LEY BROS. .Range between
i and Gallatin. P. O. address, Sa
T. Single dulap cut up. Horse (<f*
mr what you AnriLVi^i
rss'&i
«Ô.5U,
freight
receipt o*
f*- 50 - ware draper
(Joi % npt keep them. TloiUT agent»
Chaney, Anvil & Vise Co.. Detrpff. Ml
&EKÄK.
2UUUUS*
BEGAT,
It Y
TlUTIBroBt
Vi AnsSYUti

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