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The Bozeman courier. (Bozeman, Mont.) 1919-1954, January 05, 1921, Image 3

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075113/1921-01-05/ed-1/seq-3/

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Montana Farming Topics
f5
RAISING STANDARD OF FARM
STOCK BY SELECTIVE BREEDING
Raising the standard of farm ani
mals and poultry and bringing out
selective brooding is receiving more
attention as methods of farming for
certain desirable characteristics by
profit become intensified.
The breeding of domestic animals
dates back to remote antiquity, vthen
the most advanced races of the Old
World were still on the border line
between savagery and barbarism. It
•far antedates any but the simplest
mechanical arts. Yet while our knowl
t e ..U i t on
J edge of the laws of nature as they ap
. i. U- trorv
ply to machines has reached very
1 ^ , .. , ,
great magnitude and complexity, it is
.f . , - _: nrp
comparatively only a few years since
, 1 . . , . , _L no „
the principles of breeding have been,
u t. „«voiofoH
move than a collection of unrelated
, , .. ,
traditional beliefs.
OldSupcrstitions Still Current.
The same superstitions on which the
shepherds of Asia based their prac-j
ticcs at least 30 centuries ago arc still
widely current, while the one i
to the ancients—sci
sound
principle known
ection of the best for breeding stock
—is still widely neglected.
1 he piinciplcs of successful an.i- 1 —^
breeding, as they have been learned}
bv practical experience in the United}
States and older countries, and by!
cartful scientific study along difinite
Department
lines, are outlined in
Bulletin 905, recently issued by the;
of Agri
l his bulletin goes into the first
United States Departmen
culture.
intensity the desirable characteristicsj
and weed out the undesirable,
characteristics which can
principles of reproduction and follow
the means by which certain character-j
iftiics of one or the other parent

t" e |
ave
transmitted to the offspring
methods of selection best suited to
the
!
!
taintly be expected to continue vt om j
generation to another, those which
>. uncertain, those which will blend
with cer
e
r
1 those which can not be inherited
'
Aside from mere increase in nun * _
her? the purposes which the breeder is;
likely to have in mind fail under two
or less distinct heads, namely,
j
I
made with the assurance that Ih®)
will bo of a certain definite
production of a uniform product, j
improvement- A uniform product de
pends on such control over the here
dity of the stock that matings can
iv.ro
O (
type for which there is a demand. Im
provement is, of course, closely relat-;
<.<! to contrôle over heredity, but the
methods which give the greatest con
trol are not necessarily those which}
1- • d to the most rapid improvement,
e subject'
A Basis for Selection.
In a broad sense the whol
of practical breeding
the head of selection
basis for such selection is the,
der:
The most ob
comes u n
10US
them
- Unfortunately, the merits of
kinds of livestock cannot
performance of the
animais
s*_*!v
be
iired directly. The study of con
formation as an index of useful
alities has accordingly held a high
1 lace as a basis for selection for
breeding stock. Livestock judging
has this for its purpose. An animal
«'i' good breeding is a better one
breed than one of equal individual
vit but of mixed or common breed
r.ic
in t
Pedigree, though often misused,
i- a valuable aid to selection, apart
from following a genei*al policy of!
ir
• i •
• • i i in i'ii mi i i iiiiitiii'i 'iiirumtiiiii ■nitiaiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiitiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiianiiiiimiitiiiiin
Why Women Wear Jewelry
1
Simply because it makes them more attractive by
emphasizing the beauty of natural characteristics, or the
prettiness of a costume.
That is why jewelry is fashionable and always in de
mand. .
Knowing this, Pease's makes a feature of having the
new' styles in designs and color effects when they first
come out.
Bracelets, Bar Pins, Rings and Necklaces being especially
in vogue, we have exceptionally fine displays,
priced from
$1.00 to $5.00 and up
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H. A. PEASE & CO.
JEWELERS and OPTOMETRISTS
The Hallmark
6 W. Main Street
Store
t
The soundest basis of all
mating.
for selection of breeding stock is the
record of past performance as a breed
er, provided the record is sufficiently
extensive to give a fair test.
The bulletin gives many valuable
pointers on the selection of cattle for
! milk and butterfat production and for
beef; the breeding of sheep for wool
and mutton; of hogs for pork; and of
poultry for eggs and meat
» <* ■" '">« the ( *** * r
S.res-Better Stock movement of the
Department of Agr.culture, by which
farmers are bemg encouraged to budd
"P their flocks and herds rapidly
through the selection of purebred
The bulletin, which con
. , ,
tains 67 pages and numerous charts
/ " , , <Tl . .
and illustrations, is entitled, "Pnnci
,. „ T . .
pies of Live Stock Breeding.' It may
£ ....... . , . -!
be obtained at the nominal cost ofi
« e - * , „a.
15 cents from the Superintendent of
„ . ..
« Documents, Government Printing
« . .. . „
I Office, Washington, D. C.
j
I FIFTEENTH STOCK SHOW
fifteen
OPENS ITS DOORS JAN. 15
;
It fork something more than stock
shoevs to cause such a marvelous ad
vancement in agriculture and live
; stock production as the Rocky Moun
^
tam
years, but no single movement has
( done more to bring it about than have
* these
,
region has shown in
exhibitions. The fifteenth an
Entries closed December 20 and
different individual filings had
Lial event is to be held at Denver,
an. 15 to 22, and it is the best chance
1 ever presented to study purebred pro
Eviction, marketing and facts con
\
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Cuming the growing industry general
It will be a special chance to get
■ possession of some fine stock at rca
| sonable rates
y.
! been made. This includes cattle,
horses, sheep and swine. Two hun
j t | rot j anc j f ouv carlots of breeding cat
^| e are en tored for auction.
In addi
tion there arc entries of 1,200 birds
in the poultry show, and a vast ex
position of farm machinery and equip
A corn show
j ment is being installed
I is a new feature this year, run by
swine building costing $20,000. That}
is the way the show grows from yearj
Colorado Farm Bureau officers, and
j the? management has had to erect a
to year, and those who would keep !
abreast of the times cannot afford
to miss one.
In the horse show arena nine differ,
ont performances will be given in
which the most beautiful highly train
ed horses in the United States are
j
to bo shown doing their paces. Four
} $1.000 purses are hung up this year
for gaited and jumping horses, at
trading to this show the strings of
hula Long Combs, Mrs. O. H. Loh
A or ^ an< l others
different. Each night two types of
all 1921 automobile models will he
niann °f Chicago, Belle Beach of New
Every program i.^
paraded in the ring.
Every moment at the horr-e shows
will be busy and inspiring. Each day
at the stock show will be an aduca
tion- All manner of pleasure for
visitors is arranged down town, from
a week of athletic events by the D. A.
toiC- to shows a plenty on the gay
"White Way" and the biggest lot of
attractive merchandise displayed that
ever has been tendered in a city
known for its gargain sales and
to-date stores.
up
CARE OF BREEDING COWS
BEFORE AND AFTER THE
CALVING PERIOD
The proper care of the breeding,
cows, and particularly during a per-(
iod of about three weeks before and;
a like period after calving, is essen
tial to success in the raising of cat
tie.
The number of breeding cows main.
Jtained in one lot or yard depends up
on the disposition of the cattle- An oc
casional cow is observed that should
be kept in a separate lot because of
injury she njay do to other cows.
Hereford cows are usually of such a
disposition that six to fifteen can be
profitably maintained in one lot. The
breeding cows should be provided with
a covered shed with ample protection
from storms. The arrangement of
the shelter will therefore vary with
the location of the herd- The shed
should be amply provided with bed
ding and should be cleaned daily.
Alfalfa in quantities varying from
30 to 50 pounds daily will maintain
breeding cows through the winter
season. Substitutes for alfalfa, us
ing such quantities as will provide
an equal food value, such as Japanese
clover, cowpeas, timothy, clover and
I prairie hay, will serve the same pur
pose. In some sections, and es
pecially in some seasons, the supply
of hay or roughage is very limited and
the breeding cows arc maintained on
the range and fed 1 to 2 pounds of
cottonseed cake daily. This is not an
ideal ration, but circumstances re
quiie its usow The breeding cows
'Tiust be carefully observed daily and
■ the breeding records consulted. Every
cow should be placed in a properly
bedded, lighted and ventilated box
stall every night for a period of at
least two weeks prior to the time of
calving. Every cow that is placed in
a box stall should be given a ration
for the production of milk, such ra
tion being gradually increased up to
a full milk ration, in order to stimu
late the production of sufficient milk,
it' possible, to maintain her calf and
thus avoid the necessity of a nurse
cow.
After the cow has calved, she should
be kept separate with her calf and
properly housed at night until the
calf is ten days or two weeks old,
when they can be placed with other
cows and calves. The number of
cows and calves that can be kept in
the same lot will depend upon the dis
position of the cows but should not
exceed 12 or 15 head during cold
weather. The shelter provided fojr
the cows with calves should be ample
for protection. The feed should con
sist of a hay and grain ration, select
-mg the ration for the purpose of
milk production.
Some purebred breeders have suf
fered extensive losses of both cows
and calves, duo to the fact that the
cows were too fat at calving time, j
Excessive fat is a hindrance to the
normal delivery of a calf, because of
the mechanical interference of fat de
i P 0S '^ s around the uterus and also be
cause of the weakened condition of
the muscles essential in the muscular
tissue that forces the calf from the
uterus to the outside world.
The first principle in the pdevention
of difficulty in calving is to main
tain the cow in a normal condition,
to flesh and exercise. Difficult calv
as
due to improper position of the
calf in the uterus, can be overcome in
mg,
most cases by anual manipulation of
the calf within the uterus, but such
procedure should be done only by
competent veterinarian;
permanent injury of the cow may
suit
a
otherwise
re
If a co\y does not effect a de
livery of her calf in a few hours time
the veterinarian should b e called.
• Springer cows should be
tained that they obtain ample
so mam
exer
cise because insufficient exercise di
minishes the possibility of normal de
seveif*
livery of calves.
The proper ration for the cow be
fore and after calving is of prime
importance in the prevention of the
development of diteary disturbances
in the calf which is manifested by
scour and not infrequently terminates
indeath. The injudicious use of nurse
cows has been responsible for
ing and the sepuential development of
indigestion, colic, scour and
stunting or death of the calf
W hite scour and calf pneumonia are
infectious conditions and
gorg-.
are most
common in calves from cows affected
with contagious abortion or other in
fectious diseases of the genital
gans.
or
Some cases of calf dysentery
are the result of infection in milk
and may be due to inflammation of
the udder (garget). As previously
stated, an important diet of the cow
very important predisposing
I cause for calf scour and also calf
I pneumonia,
e should be maintained in clean quar
f ter s and the calves should be protect
| ed against sudden changes of temper
= a tu re and properly housed^ during
is a
The cows and calves
storms, as undue exposure is an ira
portant predisposing cause cf pneu
monia.
■B
Should pneumonia, scour or any
-
te*
PROFITS BE DARNED
We're going to sell goods, and if you've been waiting for prices to come down—
they are down with a bang, and you've no excuse for waiting longer. Our buyer is
going to eastern markets in a few days and we are going to move the goods on hand
and start the spring business w T ith a fresh stock from cellar to garret- Read these prices
and then remember please, that every item quoted is from our regular high grade stock
and were not bought especially for sale purposes. Our guarantee of "Satisfaction or
Money Back" goes with every sale the same as if you paid their true w T orth.
o
I
Suits
Overcoats
$23.00
$37.50
$47.50
$62.50
$24.75
$34-75
$54.75
LOT 1. A few for.
LOT 2. Values to $55 for.
LOT 3. Values to $75 for.
LOT 4. Values to $90 for
Every one all wool and made by fam
ous makers such as Hart Schaffner &
Marx, Society Brand and Fashion Park.
LOT 1. Values to $45 for.
LOT 2. Values to $55 for
LOT 3. Values to $85 for
Shirts
Here is where you can steal and still
have the law to protect you.
Values to $4.00 in Emery stiff cuff... $1.65
Values to $5.00 in Emery shirts.$2.65
Values to $7.00 in Manhattan shirts..$3.65
Silk shirts at
Socks
75c
Holeproof silk plaited at
Fine wool dress hose at
Silk fibre ..
. $1.00
3 pairs for $1.00
$6.95 and $7.95
YOU'LL FIND JUST AS MANY BARGAINS IN OTHER THINGS NOT QUOTED
HERE. YOU CAN GET NECKTIES, SHOES, UNDERWEAR, CAPS, HATS AND
GLOVES AT BARGAIN PRICES.
g
S
D
WESTPHAL'S
g
B
8
%
8
Successors to Holloway's
Home of Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes
Quality Corner
disease be observed, in a calf
other
or calves in a lot where there are,
cral, they, with their dams, should
be separated at once and the lot thor- !
ouehly cleaned to prevent further
The affected
:
sev
spread of the disease.
alves should be promptly treated by
a competent veterinarian.
I
BIG DECREASE IN STATE
LIVESTOCK
!
The Montana Livestock Sanitary \
board will make-çight recommenda-J
lions to the legislature- according to
the biennial report of the board- The
report includes the biennial reports
of Dr. W. J. Butler, state veterinary ;
surgeon, and of the chemist, l»acte-l
riologist and pathologist of the board j
and orders of the sanitary board in 1
the last two years- It shows that dur-j
ing the last two years deputy state!
veterinary surgeons inspected and ex
amined 2,415,222 head of livestock
and traveled 364,274 miles.
The legislative recommendations j
of the livestock sanitary board, sub-j
mitted to the legislature, are:
. Standardization of milk ac
cording to its bacterial count and
establishment of city, county or state
centralization plants where milk shall!
be examined by an official bacteriolo. !
gist and shall be pasteurized if it
does not pass the test satisfactorily. I
2. A statute requiring pasteuriz
ing of all skimmed -milk
tor slop from receiving stations.
3- A statute requiring cleaning
and disinfecting of stock
4. A statute requiring the
per disposal of all dead animals,
5 . a statute providing
form methods for inspecting and tu
berculin testing dairy herds.
6. Legislation governing import
ations of sheep, which will not be
held to interfere with interstate
merce, but which will
safe guard theep interests of Mon
tana.
7. A statute prohibiting running
at large scrub stallions
yeSrs old.
. 8
or sépara- 1
cars.
pro
more uni- 1
com
continue to
over two
A statute designating the qua».
lity of hay which may be shipped ih
to Montana.
Oliver O. OlsdfiTwell known paint
er of the city, has purchased the auto
painting business of E. ?. Bullock
and is conducting the business. Mr.
Olsôn and Mr. Bullocfc were in part
nership in the business a number of
yearn ago.
Ë&fëjji
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Patronize Our Advertisers
- f„«i - , ; :-——
There Will Be No Regrets
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Farm Buildings |
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Are the best indication of the permanence and pro- (
sperity of any system of farming, for farm buildings and A
livestock farming go hand in hand. "
We are coming to a great era of livestock production, (
It may not come this year, or next, but come it is bound to. |
It is only through livestock that we can make money enough A
to pay for high priced land. And no one can raise livestock
without adequate buildings.
There is another thing. You may want to sell your «
farm. Nothing helps a sale so much as good improvements.
Particularly is this true when your purchases is an east
ern farmer who knows the part good buildings play in
livestock production' f
All of these points are merely statements of facts
with which you are already familiar. But we want to drive
them home, particularly at this time for
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NOW IS THE TIME TO BUILD WHEN PRICES ARE
REDUCED 10 to 20%
You wont have any opportunity next summer or
fall, it's build now or wait a year. Can you afford to wait?
If you are figuring on building, talk to a Copeland
man anywhere in the county. He'll put it to you straight.
?
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COPELAND LUMBER
company
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