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The Bozeman courier. (Bozeman, Mont.) 1919-1954, January 12, 1921, Image 10

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075113/1921-01-12/ed-1/seq-10/

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COURIER OWNER
Mr. Sears was married to Emma
Bradley of Bozeman on June 4, 1830.'
vivo him, the latter being Frank L.1
Sears, Thomas H. Sears and Mrs.!
all of
DIES LAST SUNDAY
(Continued from page one.)
man Courier. Mi*. Sears bought outj
John Dawes' interest and was scle
owner of the Courier at the time of
his death.
Mrs. Sears and three children sur
George Davenport (Edith),
Bozeman. There is • one grandson,
Forrest, the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Scars. Mr. Sears also left one,
adopted son, Claude Cummings ofj
Casper, Wyoming, who arrived Tues-:
day morning for the funeral. One,
brother, C. J. Soars and a sister, Mrs.
Frank Aldcrson, live in Bozeman,
another brother, Theo, Sears, lives
in Chicago ami a brother Thomas
Sears and a sister live in Ontario
Mr. Sears had been troubled with
shortness of breath for several weeks
before ho was taken sick- On Decern
her 4 he took a physical exaination:
and was ordered by his physician toj
stay home and bo quiet. It was his
intention to spend the rest of the w n.j
ter at a lower altitude and for
purpose of taking him to California!

INVENTORY SALE PRICES
ARE CUT TO THE QUICK
ON HEAVY WINTER
STUFF
Money is what we want—not
merchandise.
a.|
See These Prices
Suit? and overcoats as low as
$20.00
Canadian mackinaws, $18 and
$20 values $14-25.
Keystone cord trousers ;
guaranteed cord, $6.75.
Here's a Special
Work Shoes $4.75
Many more bargains. Come
and see for yourself.
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of Clean-Up Items at Half Their Value and Less
Come Early
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A Great Feast of Bargains in Staple Every-day Needs
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BUY BUNGALOW APRONS NOW
NEW APRONS, NEW PRICE, DID SELL
FOR $1.95. NOW SPECIAL.
BUY PILLOW CASES NOW
NEW CASES AT*NEW PRICES, DID SELL
FOR 49c. NOW SPECIAL .
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Sale of Bed Sheets
Men's Overall Sale
Ü
19c
30c OUTING FLANNELS IN LIGHT
FANCY PATTERNS, 27 INCHES WIDE—
7 AP 4
Fine quality sheets, size 1x00, that
did sell for $2.45 each. Extra special
bargain
In blue with and without bib, good
quality that did sell for S2.27 to $3.00
Now special
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19c
25c WOMAN'S GOOD FLAT LISLE HOSE
BLACK AND CORDOVAN. NOW—
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$1.85 each
'O
$1.50
29c
45c TOIL DU NORD GINGHAM IN
PLADS AND PLAIN COLORS. NOW—
The Coats
The Dresses |
Bungalow Apron Sale
Men's Underwear Sale
J.
Just a few cloth coat?
eft—Values up to $39.50.
They all go in this lot at
Extra size bungalow aprons in light
and dark colors, sizes 46, 48, 50 and
52- Come early
LOT ONE
All silk and serge dres- |
ses worth up to $29.50 go
in this lot at
Men's extra fine quality $^.50 fleec
ed lined union suits, in all sizes, 36 to
44. Now Special
A
45c PERCALÉS 36 INCHES WIDE. 7Q r
LIGHTS AND DARKS, NOW SPECIAL— * ' ^
15=5;
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$12.95
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$1.98 each
$2.95 suit
$14.50 I
ISc
25c MENS GREY WORK SOCKS, GOOD
QUALITY. NOW SELLING AT—
1
Women's Shoe Sale
Men's Shoe Sale
The Skirts
!
LOT two
All silk and serge dres
ses worth up to 519.50 go
in this lot at
$3.75 MENS PART WOOL GOAT SWEAT- 2 4^
ERS. GOOD VALUES. NOW—
Grey swede and tan^calf military
heel shoes, values to $8.45. Special
sale..
t
Men's good heavy work shoes in
tan leather and values to $5.95. Now
special
This lot includes some
silk and wool skirts in
an limited amount, at
!
UP TO $4.95 VALUES IN MEN'S GOOD 105
DRES HATS, CLEAN-UP NOW— 1 ^• U
$9.50
$4.00 pair
Half Price
pair
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HOT WATER TOILET SOAP MADE BY PALM OLIVE
CO. A REAL 10 c SELLER—NOW SPECIAL—2 BARS
FOR 15c
FANCY LIGHTS AND DARKS AND PLAIN WHITE
STANDARD QUALITY OIL CLOTH—DID SELL FOR 60c
NOW SPECIAL—50c PER YARD.
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party man. Up to last fail he was
Gallatin's member of the republican
state central committee, but he never
he'd or aspired to public office. He
was a life member of the Bozeman
lodge No. 463, Benevolent and Pro
tcctive Order of Elks, the local camp
of the Woodman of the World and the
his life-long friend, John H- Dawes,
arrived in Bozeman last week. Despite
every care Mr. Sears continued to
grow worse, the end coming Sunday
morning.
Mr. Sears was a lifelong republican
in politics and was an enthusiastic
local Brotherhood of American Yeo
n i en -
The funeral was held Tuesday
afternoon from the Episcopal church,
The Elks, Woodmen and the Printers
Union attended the funeral in a body,
escorting Mr. Sear's body from the
West parlors to the church and thence
to the cemetery grounds. Rev. F. B.
Lewis officiated at the services. The
Elks burial services was given by Ex
alted Ruler H.» D. Bath, assisted by
the other officers of the local lodge
The music was furnished by Mrs.
Claude Stcffans. Mrs. Ed- II. Howard,
j Bernard Copping and Alonzo Truitt,
James
thelThos. Fowler,
R. Wilson and Allen Cameron were
the pall bearers. The church was
filled with old friends and neighbors
of Mr. Soars and the floweral offer
ings were very beautiful.
P. Bold, Walter Aiken,
R. R Dawes, M.
In fine courtesy to the memory of
Mr. Sears the Chronicle offices were
closed during the hours of tbe funer
|al.
j
IN AGRrrMENT
(Cuntiiiued irom fa'e
city and banks
treasurer for the purpose of doing!
away with the present indebtedness, j
they will continue to accept newly I
isterod warrants at par up to $50,-1
000. In addition to the six per cent j
which the warrants carry the city j
agrees to pay the banks four per;
cent for cashing them. Should the
bond market improve and the
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city!
he able to sell funding bands later,
the agreement with the banks will
net prevent the city from soiling the
und.ng bonds at any time. With thej
exception of Amos Hall, who was ill !
and A. W. Orton, who is in California,|
the entire council was present and!
aL rc °d unanimously to the plan. j
A letter was read from the former
city attorney, Justin M. Smith, thank
ing the mayor and council for the
treatment accorded him while he was
city attorney and giving a review of
what had been accomplished and an
outline of what should be done by the
cit y- R e tendered 1rs assistance to
the new city attorney in several mat-j
ters which had been started but anr
not V et finished. The letter with sug-!
gestions war referred to the new city
attorney with the suggestion that
lhe matters mentioned by Mr. Smith
be carried out. Mayor Sweet extend-j
ed to the retiring attorney the thanks
or the city and the counci, for hi,
work and his appreciation.
An emergency ordinance was passed
to regulate the operation of taxis at
the railway depots. The ordinance!
provides that the cars shall be park-'
ed at the depot at an angle of 45
degrees with three feet of free space;
on either side to permit passengers
to get in or leave the vehicles. The
driver is required to stand not more
than five feet from his tms or cab.!
A fine of from $10 to $50 is provided
for violation of the ordinance.
The mayor submitted the names of;
new appointees to the council and all
were unanimously approved. The list
included Walter Aiken for city at-|
torney, vice Justin M. Smith resign
ed; Fred Bull as member of the ceme-j
tery board, vice E. H. Fisher and Ro
[bert Maupin to the policeman, vice
Charles Gray, resigned.
The general reports of officers for
were handed in.
Judge Ellis garnered $108 for varying
offenses and Chief Robertson collect
ed $125.50 in city licenses. Only two
the past month
fire alarms were turned in during De
comber, a fine record when Christmas
is considered and the total loss re
ported by Chief Alexanded amounted
to but $12. The cemetery board has
$254.38 on hand according to Secretary
Davies report. The water depart-1
nient, the big item, on the city's collec
tions, turned in $3,162.98 according to!
Collector Spieth
Two reports were handed in for va-!
eating streets and alleys. The ccmc
tery board asks that parts of Koch,
street and Cypress avenue and parts
of two alleys bo vacated in order to!
add to the cemetery the lots recently
! purchased. Another proposition to va
cate Birch street from Rouse to Mon-i
tana avenue and Montana avenue fromj
j Birch to Oak and an alley included
The annual election of officers took
place at yesterday > s mee ting and the
officers of ^ he preceeding year were
a jj re _ e i ec t e d. These consist of Dr.
was brought up. Both were referred
to the street committee.
LOAN ASSOCIATION
MEETS YESTERDAY
(Continued from Page 1)
q g g mith> president; B- B. Law,
[cQ president; P. C. Waite, secretary;
Armour McGmley, L. E. Megee and
A w . Osborne, directors; H. M- Cat
Armour McGinlev and F T
^ £ r *with
H . p John L E . Megee and A.
W. Osborne, alternate appraisers,
MIGNON QUAW'S PICTURE
\ JUT WITH LOCAL PEOPLE
i ——
(Continued from Page 1)
:
A large number of local people took
prominent parts in the cast, indeed
everyone i n the film was from the!
Gallatin \allejr, where all the scenes*put
were laid- Fred Jackson as Grandpa
Little was the most prominent and
popular character, though in popu
! a rity young Peter Meloy of Townsend
i ran him a close second. E. H. Lott
c f the college extension staff, Miss
Mary A. Pinkney, an employee at the
college and little Margaret Cardon,
daughter of Prof, and Mrs. Cardon,
were the other leading characters and
all did remarkably well for amateurs.
In the dance scenes and other group
pictures many local people, both from
the college and the city took part and
it was easy to recognize such well
known characters and President andi
Mrs. Atkinson, Roy Martin and many.
The scenes of the film are laid in)
the Gallatin valley and here the films
fail to do justice to the valley scenery,
the vistas being vague and indistinct,
more.
The applause from the audience was
very general throughout the picture
and most noticeable when Miss Quaw'si
name was flashed on the screen,
-
MARY E. SPALDING
Mrs. Mary E. Spalding, mother of
Prof. M. H. Spalding of the zoology
department at the college, died atj
her home on West Babcock street;
Friday morning at 11 o'clock as a re-|
j suit of blood poisoning from an in
DIES* ON FRIDAY
fected hand- Mrs, Spaulding had been
suffering from her hand for several
days but it was not considered seri
ous until Thursday evening.
Mrs- Spaulding's body was taken to
services-were held Tuesday. She was
survived by two sons and a daughter.
|
Spokane Sunday afternoon by her son
and Dr, W. S. Bole, where funeral
GOVERNOR DIXON
VISITS BOZEMAN
.
mto the men amI won,en , of the
far , ms " The governor then went on
*? " oi "' 'he fannere had
* ,wayS la ' ke ? or K a " I:!a "» n aI >< 1 h ®"«
were unable to act together in any of
(Continued from page 1)
their operations. He advised all the
farmers to rally around their farm
bureaus and county agents and to
work through them, with the cooper
ation of both the state and federal
governments.
Governor Dixon then spoke of his
contemplated department of agricul
ture and said that it was his idea to
all the different agricultural de
partments of the
state government
um ] e r a single head, both to save
money and to make for more effi
cient work,
His plans were, he said,
for a department of agriculture that
would be a potent factor in the de
velopment of the state. He urged the
1
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Do You' Want
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WE HAVE THE WASHOE BEAR CREEK
COAL — THE CLEANEST COAL FROM THE
BEAR CREEK FIELDS. WE ARE THE ONLY
AND EXCLUSIVE AGENTS FOR OWL CREEK
COAL. IF YOU TRY A LOAD OF EITHER OF
THESE, YOU WILL NOT BE DISAPPOINTED.
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Gallatin Lumber Co.
1
PHONE 20
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stockmen and farmers of the state
to work together and to get together
in asking for desired legislation and
said that the department ~5f agricul
ture, as well as the farm bureaus and
county agents would be the rallying
point from which all good farm
movements could be started.
During the program the orchestra
of the Bozeman chamber of commerce
and the high school glee club furnish
ed music.
After speaking at the theatre
Governor Dixon went to the Elks club
where an informal reception was held
for him. Here he greeted many old
friends and spent a couple of hours
chatting to the members of the club.
He made a short, informal talk, em
phasizing the same points that he
brought out in his speech earlier in
the evening. One thing he said was
a surprise to most of his hearers and
that was
that the bonded indebtedness
of the state had increased from $21.
000,000 to $42,000,000 in the last two
About midnight the reception
years.
broke up and later the governor took
train No. 41 to Helena.
Soon after he got in in the after
noon Governor Dixon went to the col
lege and gave a brief talk to the boys
attending the vocational conference,
pointing out to them the advantages
of higher education.

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